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Thread: Fort Greene Development

  1. #46

    Default 235 Cumberland Street

    Project #18

    235 Cumberland Street
    4 stories 38 feet
    Benjamin Ellis
    Dev-Eve Havlicek
    Residential
    4 units 8,870 Sq. Ft.
    Under Construction




    http://www.mapquest.com/maps/map.adp...te=ny&zipcode=
    Map

  2. #47

    Default The GreeneHouse Condos

    Quote Originally Posted by Derek2k3

    Project #1

    The GreeneHouse Condos
    383 Carlton Avenue/43 Greene Avenue
    12 stories 128 feet
    Meltzer Mandl Architects
    Dev-David Weiss of Carlton Adelphi LLC
    Residential Condominiums
    27 units 67,919 Sq. Ft.
    Under Construction 2003-Early 2005


    $1G a square foot
    Ft. Greene condos hit record high
    By Jess Wisloski
    The Brooklyn Papers


    http://www.brooklynpapers.com/html/i...8_16nets2.html

    Brooklyn’s real estate boom has reached a new plateau — the $1,000-a-square-foot condominium apartment.

    But according to an executive brokering sales at the building that is setting the new market high, what is surprising is not that wealthy New Yorkers are willing to fork over all that moolah to live here — a walkup on Columbia Heights along the Brooklyn Heights promenade fetched $9 million this year and another on that skyline-view stretch is on the market for $20 million — it’s where this new peak is cresting.

    No, it’s not the waterside loft-ridden DUMBO, where recent open houses held by The Developers Group and Leviev Boymelgreen Developers had buyers waiting for a peek at an offsite model home in overnight queues around the block. Nor is it in the tree-lined brownstone colonies of Park Slope or Brooklyn Heights.

    Instead, it is leafy, hilly Fort Greene.

    Known for the Brooklyn Academy of Music, a slew of French restaurants and a burgeoning African-influenced strip of stores and restaurants along Fulton Street, the once crime-ridden and still edgy neighborhood, settled around a landmark park, features quaint architectural variety, a thriving art scene and a rich ethnic mix of residents.

    Jerry Minsky, senior vice president with Corcoran Properties, said the Greene House condominiums, at 383 Carlton St. at Greene Avenue, started listing units on Nov. 30, and since then, 22 of the 27 units have sold, the majority at more than $1,000 a square foot. The three penthouse units sold for more than $1.2 million each.

    Paul Palazzo, an executive member of the Fort Greene Association, said he and several residents of Carlton Street organized demonstrations outside of the building during weekend open houses.

    The association asked the Department of Buildings to audit the design for the 11-story Greene House, which towers over its walkup brick and brownstone neighbors.

    While the Buildings Department audit, completed early last year, did provide a kind of community-level review of architect Marvin Metzler’s design, Palazzo said that in the end it mainly served to address minor aesthetic and safety issues.

    “There were some things that did come up in the audit that [the architects] needed to verify and change,” he said. “Their response was to make it go higher.” The Greene House sits literally just outside the Fort Greene Historic District, which bars such a tall building, so its views will never be hampered by future developments.

    “The historic districts were drawn very poorly in the 1978 designation,” said Palazzo, who chastised Greene House developers David Weiss and Jonathan Jacobs — who made their name with developments in TriBeCa and the East Village — for being “incredibly belligerent and not responsive to any requests from the community.”

    Minksy said, however, it was their responsiveness — to buyers, at least — that was able to lure such high prices in Brooklyn.

    “They did understand this process, and they did understand because they’d been in the East Village before they’d been here,” he said. “I’ll admit it’s not cheap, but you’re getting something, you’re actually getting something for your money. They will sit down, literally for hours. to design the unit with [buyers]. They really don’t have that Brooklyn kind of mentality.

    “It was a slightly foreign concept, but these developers were ahead of their game,” said Minsky, the exclusive agent for the condominiums.

    A stalwart of the “brownstone generation” that bought up Downtown Brooklyn neighborhoods more than 20 years ago, Minksy — who lives in Fort Greene — said he hedged when first offered the listing.

    Calling it “originally conceived of as a slightly ambiguous project for this area,” he said he was eventually reassured after meeting the developers.

    “What first seemed to be a little anxiety-producing for me — because I’m on the brownstone end — has turned out to be a very pleasant experience,” he said, adding he came very close to buying one of the unit’s himself.

    Each of the 27 new units, which are situated three per floor, feature 10-foot ceilings, central air conditioning and heat, new appliances and, says Minsky, “phenomenal” views of the neighborhood, the park and the distant harbor.

    The glassed-in entrance will have a “very lounge-like feel,” and the building will have a 24-hour gym. The south-, east- and west-facing views make for sunny one- two- and three- bedroom apartments for the new owners, who Minsky said were “experienced, high-end Manhattan people who understand visible signs of growth in the area [and] they don’t feel like they’re compromising what they would have a few years ago.”

    Palazzo called those same gorgeous views the reason the neighboring buildings would depreciate in value.

    “When the historic district was designated, the boundaries were done very poorly,” he reiterated. “As a result there are three houses that were in the historic district that have basically degraded because of that building.”

    Though he said the Fort Greene Association would remain vigilant with respect to future developments, and noted that a demonstration last weekend showed the neighbors’ “unified stance,” they had no plans to abdicate their welcoming-committee responsibilities, either.

    “We are going to welcome the people in the building into the community, because it is now in the community. We don’t like the fact that the building — the edifice of it — is not sympathetic to the community; we hope that the people in the building are,” he said.

    Chris Havens, marketing manager of Two Tress, the DUMBO-based development company of David and Jed Walentas, said that occasionally some of the company’s more established DUMBO properties, “on some special new units,” sell for $1,000 per square foot.

    Developers Group Executive Vice President Highlyann Krasnow said that four weeks ago, it listed penthouse and ninth four units in DUMBO for over $1,000 a foot. She said she expects the trend to increase.

    Minsky said the Greene House condo has raised the bar for standards of design and construction, adding that he has had “so many Brooklyn developers call me on the sly to see how they did it.”

    “You’re not going to be able to put together a sloppy building after this one,” said the broker. “These are very, very sophisticated apartments.”


    Check out discussionon browstoner about the architectural character the building; some interesting opinions.
    http://brownstoner.com/brownstoner/a...house_co_1.htm
    l
    Last edited by Derek2k3; May 1st, 2005 at 12:36 PM.

  3. #48

    Thumbs up Fort Greene Town House

    Project # 19

    Fort Greene Town House
    22 Fort Greene Place
    3/4 stories 40 feet
    Christoff:Finio architecture
    Dev-Miro and Weiss
    Residential Town House
    1 unit 3,044 Sq. Ft.
    Completed 2003




    Christoff:Finio architecture
    Fort Greene House


    http://www.christofffinio.com/cfarch_nocheck_nav.html

    The foundation of our proposal is a new layer of urban infrastructure that would reinvent the New York City skyline: a “farm” of wind turbines that would gradually spread across the rooftops of the city, standing as the silent witnesses to our loss and as the symbolic divestment of our dependence on foreign oil. The turbines’ rotating arms would shape a public space of memory far beyond the confines of the World Trade Center site, generating physical and emotional energy from the same wind that keeps planes aloft, carries clouds of debris, fuels fires, and sustains life.

    We propose that the New York City Zoning Resolution be amended to require all residential and commercial buildings over a certain gross area to generate a percentage of their own electrical consumption using rooftop wind turbines that harness the power of prevailing winds. The percentage would be determined as a factor of the building’s size and use. For practical reasons, these requirements would be phased in over the course of several years.



    Upscale, Downscale
    Michael Weschler for The New York Times
    By RAUL A. BARRENECHE
    Published: May 5, 2005


    http://www.nytimes.com/2005/05/05/garden/05fort.html

    THE four-story town house that Darcy Miro and Lars Weiss built on a weedy lot in Fort Greene, Brooklyn, contains no fancy finishes - no mahogany floors or plaster moldings. On the contrary, there are hardly any finishes at all, barely even drywall, among the exposed joists, electrical conduits and ventilation ducts.

    These rooms are determinedly dressed down and studiously casual, with a low-grade flooring normally covered by carpets or tile, and stairs made of humble pine nailed in place, like those contractors put up for temporary use.

    By omitting the polish, Ms. Miro, an artist and jewelry designer, and Mr. Weiss, an indie music producer, were able to build their 4,200-square-foot home with two studios for $550,000, or about $130 a square foot (not including the cost of the land). By contrast, a four-story town house a block away is currently listed at $2.2 million.

    The result is a mix of the rough-edged and refined, with coarse brick walls offset by floral wallpaper based on a Dagobert Peche design from 1922, and industrial metal railings gliding by a bedroom with a 1920's Italian dresser and a whimsical Finnish chandelier. It's as if a do-it-yourself Brooklyn hipster had set up house with a TriBeCa furniture dealer. In fact, the house is not unlike Ms. Miro's metal jewelry, which has an industrial, careworn beauty.....
    http://www.nytimes.com/2005/05/05/garden/05fort.html


    the front façade (photo: Jean-Francois Jussaud)

    Links:
    http://www.mapquest.com/maps/map.adp...te=ny&zipcode=
    Map

    http://brownstoner.com/brownstoner/a...tml#trackbacks
    Brownstoner
    DIY Townhouse in Fort Greene

    http://www.aiany.org/designawards/20...ecture/375.htm

  4. #49

    Default 208 Vanderbilt Avenue

    Project #20

    208 Vanderbilt Avenue
    4 stories 40 feet
    David Hotson Architect
    Dev-James Casebere
    Residential
    42 units (error?) 3,922 Sq. Ft.
    Under Construction 2004-2005




    http://www.mapquest.com/maps/map.adp...te=ny&zipcode=
    Map

  5. #50

    Default Navy Yard Brig Site

    Demolition begins.

    Quote Originally Posted by Derek2k3
    Project #10

    Navy Yard Brig Site
    Between Flushing and Park Avenues and Clermont and Vanderbilt Streets
    Mixed Use
    ~400 apartments, as well as commercial and community space
    Proposed
    As It Faces Demolition, a Look Back at the Navy Yard's Former Brig
    by JENNIFER BLEYER
    April 11, 2005
    New York Times


    http://gothamgazette.com/community/33/news/1444

    For 11 years, the spooky old jail has been empty. Its barbed wire has rusted. Its cellblocks were lighted at night to keep trespassers at bay. Of the neighbors who noticed, most were pleased that last week, preparatory work for its demolition had quietly begun.

    Still, the song of the Navy brig is sung by the few who remember its past, which began in 1941, when the number of sailors ballooned and new barracks and a recruiting center were built on Flushing Avenue outside the Navy Yard. During and after World War II, the building was used as a Navy prison, and busy it was.

    The sailors were wild and woolly fellows who built and fixed ships in the yard by day and drank in the saloons on Myrtle Avenue by night. Ed Carter, a longtime resident and retired social worker, remembers how sailors from the South made Brooklyn youngsters laugh with their twangy hollers of "howdy" and invited them to parties and dances.

    "When the guys got drunk and fought in the bars, the military police would come and throw them in the brig," Mr. Carter said. More than a place for real criminals, it was a place where the whiskey-soaked slept it off until the morning.

    A neighbor of Mr. Carter's, Joe Vollaro, said on the first floor there was a commissary and mess hall, where sailors nudged workers to encourage them to slip an extra hamburger onto their tray.

    After the Navy left the building in 1966, the brig became a detention center for the United States Immigration and Naturalization Service. In 1984, despite strenuous local opposition, it became a minimum-security prison for the city, which was seeking to relieve overcrowding at Rikers Island. In 1994, it was closed.

    Since 2003, the city's Department of Housing Preservation and Development and a community task force have worked to plan to demolish the brig and replace it with a complex of about 400 units of mixed-income housing, along with stores and community space.

    Memories of Navy high jinks aside, most local residents think the redevelopment of the site, after its anticipated 18-month demolition, could not come a day too soon.

    "A small percentage think it's a shame the building can't be renovated because it has historical value," said Louise Greene, a brig neighbor for 35 years and a member of the task force. "Normally, I am all for saving things. But I think in this case, it can go."

    Posted by: Joshua Brustein





  6. #51

    Default 470 Vanderbilt Avenue

    Project #21

    470 Vanderbilt Avenue
    11 stories 150 feet (Residential Conversion)
    Karl Fischer Architect
    Dev-Vanderbilt Holdings LLC (The Carlyle Group)
    Residential
    800 units 850,000 Sq. Ft. (Total)
    Proposed 2007

    470 Vanderbilt Avenue Lot I
    ~24 stories
    Karl Fischer Architect
    Dev-Vanderbilt Holdings LLC
    Residential
    800 units 850,000 Sq. Ft. (Total)
    Proposed 2007

    470 Vanderbilt Avenue Lot II
    ~15 stories
    Karl Fischer Architect
    Dev-Vanderbilt Holdings LLC
    Residential
    800 units 850,000 Sq. Ft. (Total)
    Proposed 2007

    470 Vanderbilt Avenue Lot III
    ~5 stories
    Karl Fischer Architect
    Dev-Vanderbilt Holdings LLC
    Residential
    800 units 850,000 Sq. Ft. (Total)
    Proposed 2007









    Site in blue. Atlantic Yards in red.


    The existing telecomm carrier hotel to be converted






    http://www.mapquest.com/maps/map.adp...te=ny&zipcode=
    Map

    http://www.470vanderbilt.com/
    Last edited by Derek2k3; June 7th, 2005 at 12:44 PM.

  7. #52

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Derek2k3
    Project #21

    470 Vanderbilt Avenue
    11 stories 150 feet (Residential Conversion)
    Karl Fischer Architect
    Dev-Vanderbilt Holdings LLC (The Carlyle Group)
    Residential
    800 units 850,000 Sq. Ft. (Total)
    Proposed 2007

    470 Vanderbilt Avenue Lot I
    ~24 stories
    Karl Fischer Architect
    Dev-Vanderbilt Holdings LLC
    Residential
    800 units 850,000 Sq. Ft. (Total)
    Proposed 2007

    470 Vanderbilt Avenue Lot II
    ~15 stories
    Karl Fischer Architect
    Dev-Vanderbilt Holdings LLC
    Residential
    800 units 850,000 Sq. Ft. (Total)
    Proposed 2007

    470 Vanderbilt Avenue Lot III
    ~5 stories
    Karl Fischer Architect
    Dev-Vanderbilt Holdings LLC
    Residential
    800 units 850,000 Sq. Ft. (Total)
    Proposed 2007









    Very nice, not only will it have a nice impact on the skyline, but it looks like a nice project, very appealing to the eye.

  8. #53
    Forum Veteran
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Garden City, LI
    Posts
    1,778

    Default

    Do you know if these were proposed before or after Ratnerville? Ratner will change this area so much for the better...

  9. #54

    Default

    Most likely after.

  10. #55

    Default

    This project is on the back burners for a while!!

  11. #56

    Default The St. Felix Street Firehouse Condos

    Project #22

    The St. Felix Street Firehouse Condos
    31 St. Felix Street
    4 stories 45 feet (2 story addition)
    Sheffmaker Architecture
    Dev-Jorge Concepcion
    Residential Condominiums + Commercial Space in base
    3 units 6,298 Sq. Ft.
    Under Construction 2004-2005



    Douglas Elliman
    http://www.elliman.com/Listing.aspx?...ype=newestsale



    31 St Felix Street
    Fort Greene, cross streets: Dekalb & Fulton
    WEB #: 715294

    $1,100,000
    Maint/CC: $331
    Taxes: $556
    Percent Down: 10%

    Description

    *New Development* The first showing will be on 9/11/05 please schedule your appointments today. From old to New * The St. Felix Street Firehouse Condo's * This turn of the century Firehouse has a fresh face as Brooklyn's newest addition to the ever rising condo market. With keeping the original detail, while adding an overcoat of the 21st century. These grand spaces built out to two bedroom and two baths can easily be converted to a third or back to it's original open plan. The open chef style Poggenpohl kitchen comes complete with high gloss white lacquered cabinetry and custom concrete counters. Each apartment has it's own double sized Jacuzzi bathtub with views. From the custom oak floors to the twelve foot high ceilings this is Brooklyn's most unique and revered architectural residential accomplishment. The Firehouse Condos are just two blocks from subway transportation and only 15 minutes from Midtown.



    Harbor View Realty
    http://harborviewrealty.com/sales.html

    ST Felix Street

    BROKERS WELCOME:Firehouse converted into thriving artistic condos, with 11' ceilings, oversized windows, elegant oak floors, CAC. State-of-the-Art Poggenphol Kitchen with extra deep sink from Franke, oven from Miele, dishwasher cooktop and ventilation from Bosh, subzero from Wolf. Magnificent Bathroom "Toto Innovation" with whirpool tub, enclosed shower.

    » Converted Firehouse
    » Professional Condo with garage
    » Three, 2 BR, 2 Bth loft condos
    » Poggenpohl kitchens
    » Jacuzzi
    » Large terraces

    Asking Price: $895,000 Maintenance:
    Property Type : Condo Style: Contemporary
    Bedrooms: 2.0 Baths: 2
    Kitchen: EIK Stories:
    Families: Square Feet : 1062
    Amenities: Garden & terrace
    Agent Name : Danielle Mosse Phone : 718-855-1591 x76
    WEB#: 5571



    From ltjbukem's set speed blog:
    http://ltjbukem.blogspot.com/2005/07...fts-on-st.html

    Wednesday, July 20, 2005

    New modern condo lofts on St. Felix in Ft. Greene. Check out the harborviewrealty.com site for more info. 3 residential units and a commercial space on the street. I may be mistaken, but from the pics on the site, it looks like they may have Poggenpohl kitchens (or at least some quality knockoffs). Anybody know? The three units are priced at $1.075MM, $1.3MM and $1.5MM.





  12. #57

    Default

    Neat-o.

    What's left of the firehouse besides the facade? Is the rest all new construction?

  13. #58
    Forum Veteran krulltime's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Manhattan - UWS
    Posts
    4,208

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Derek2k3
    Project #21

    470 Vanderbilt Avenue
    11 stories 150 feet (Residential Conversion)
    Karl Fischer Architect
    Dev-Vanderbilt Holdings LLC (The Carlyle Group)
    Residential
    800 units 850,000 Sq. Ft. (Total)
    Proposed 2007

    470 Vanderbilt Avenue Lot I
    ~24 stories
    Karl Fischer Architect
    Dev-Vanderbilt Holdings LLC
    Residential
    800 units 850,000 Sq. Ft. (Total)
    Proposed 2007

    470 Vanderbilt Avenue Lot II
    ~15 stories
    Karl Fischer Architect
    Dev-Vanderbilt Holdings LLC
    Residential
    800 units 850,000 Sq. Ft. (Total)
    Proposed 2007

    470 Vanderbilt Avenue Lot III
    ~5 stories
    Karl Fischer Architect
    Dev-Vanderbilt Holdings LLC
    Residential
    800 units 850,000 Sq. Ft. (Total)
    Proposed 2007









    Site in blue. Atlantic Yards in red.


    The existing telecomm carrier hotel to be converted






    http://www.mapquest.com/maps/map.adp...te=ny&zipcode=
    Map

    http://www.470vanderbilt.com/

    So what is going on with these buildings? Is it cancel or undersonctruction? Anybody knows?

  14. #59

    Default

    I don't think anything. There's a few small buildings going up nearby though...nothing special of course.

  15. #60

    Default

    05/19/2006
    Look, Up In the Sky, It’s a Bird, It’s a Plane, No...It’s Another Towering Condo
    By Stephen Witt


    An art rendering of Brooklyn’s version of the Flatiron Building now going up at 230 Ashland Place and Fulton Street.

    Call it the Flatiron Building of Brooklyn.

    And while some may complain that the 28-story, 288-foot building going up at the corner of Fulton Street and Ashland Place has its faults, the bottom line is activists and elected officials can huff and puff, but no one can blow it down.

    The Manhattan-based developer, The Clarett Group, last week revealed their plans for the site, which will ultimately have 108 market-rate condominiums and retail space on the ground floor.

    The revelation for 230 Ashland Place came during a courtesy call from the developer at last week’s Community Board 2 Land Use Committee meeting.

    The project is as-of-right, meaning it doesn’t require any zoning change to proceed.

    The lot is triangular and the building was designed to fit the site, not unlike the Flatiron Building, explained Dan Kaplan of the FXFowle Architectural firm, who designed the building.

    Kaplan further explained that while the building size is taller than the surrounding “brownstone fabric,” it will utilize lighter colors to match the surrounding buildings.

    This includes the glass tower having limestone-looking concrete bands around each floor, he said.

    Kaplan said the building site will be 40 feet off Ashland Place, which allows for two rows of trees and public space complete with amenities such as benches.

    Canopies will jut out from over the retail space, he said.

    The project will not have any on-site parking, which could tax the already scramble for parking in the area.

    Construction has already begun on the project and the completion date is expected in summer 2007.

    The Clarett Group bought the property in 2005 for a reported $12 million. The site once housed the low-rise buildings at 655 through 671 Fulton Street between Ashland Place and Rockwell Place.

    Then in early 2006, the developer demolished the buildings, creating the large triangular lot.

    The block also houses the Brooklyn Academy of Music’s (BAM) Harvey Theatre Building at 651 Fulton Street and the building at 647 Fulton Street from which BCAT (Brooklyn Cable Access Television) operates.

    The City of New York owns those two buildings and leases them back to the cultural non-profits for $1 a year.

    When the properties were first bought, City Councilmember Letitia James and other local activists were worried about the project in regard to several issues, and the concern remains.

    “I do not support this project because one, there’s no affordable housing, two, there is no parking, and three there are no benefits to the community,” said James.

    James noted that the building may be as-of-right, but the Clarett Group also gets as-of-right subsidies to build the project.

    James said she did meet with the developer and they agreed to utilize minority and women-owned businesses wherever possible, but that’s not good enough.

    “All we can do is raise our voices of protest to put pressure on them to set aside units for local residents and to make provisions for parking,” she said.

    www.fortgreenecourier.com


    http://www.curbed.com/archives/2006/...g_near_bam.php

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