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Thread: DUMBO Development

  1. #61

    Default Vinegar Hill

    Article on Vinegar Hill from the Village Voice

    http://www.villagevoice.com/nyclife/...,59179,15.html

    Close-Up on Vinegar Hill
    by Danial Adkison
    December 10th, 2004 1:40 PM

    A visitor to Vinegar Hill might wonder, while gazing down a postcard-perfect Belgian-block lane, where was the vinegar made? Surely, in one of these old buildings there must have been vats of that pungent pickling liquid, maybe even a vinegar pipeline, though it's hard to imagine now. But the neighborhood's evocative name has nothing to do with acetic acid.

    In 1801, speculator John Jackson named his newly acquired chunk of Brooklyn waterfront Vinegar Hill after a 1798 battle of the Irish rebellion—and even that hill probably wasn't named after vinegar as we know it, but a type of berry. He hoped to draw sentimental Gaelic immigrants to his new neighborhood. It worked so well that the area also become known as Irish Town, and brothels, bars, and gambling salons sprung up to cater to its blue-collar denizens.

    The neighborhood once claimed several large factories. ConEd built the behemoth Hudson Avenue Generating Station in 1951. The U.S. government decommissioned the Navy Yard in 1966, and artists and families arrived in the '70s and '80s, refurbishing the sagging century-old Greek-revival and Italianate buildings.

    Today, the eight-square-block oxbow of row houses and lush dooryards is a throwback to mid-1800s Brooklyn charm—blocked by the towering, monolithic Farragut Houses; hemmed by the Navy Yard; and sheltered by the power plant, with its smokestacks and acres of transformers. DUMBO to the immediate south offers the most open access to Vinegar Hill's historic district.

    And DUMBO's exploding real estate market is spreading uphill. The noise from saws, shovels, and hammers jars the quiet streets and alleyways of Vinegar Hill as cookie-cutter red-brick-and-steel buildings go up and warehouses are gutted for future lofts. The neighborhood association, as active as any in the city, is fighting to keep this nook precious, but Vinegar Hill, like its cousin Red Hook, has only retained its quiet urban-village atmosphere thanks to its obscurity. Just like the Hook, which Ikea and a hundred other developers are set to sink their own hooks into, Vinegar Hill is an endangered species.


    A vestige of Vinegar Hill's industrial behemoths
    photo: Holly Northrop/hnorthrop.com
    Boundaries: The Navy Yard to the north, the East River to the west, Bridge Street to the south, and Sands Street to the east.

    Transportation: The York Street stop on the F train is about a 10-minute walk from most parts of Vinegar Hill. The B61 bus serves Navy, York, and Gold streets. On-street parking is available.

    Main Drags: Front Street connects the neighborhood with DUMBO and runs the breadth of Vinegar Hill. Hudson Avenue runs perpendicular to Front and skirts the Navy Yard. York and Bridge streets host minuscule commercial zones.

    Prices to Rent and Buy: "Vinegar Hill is a hard neighborhood to gauge because there isn't a lot of turnover," says Caleb Taggart, an agent for Douglas Elliman Real Estate. "But when things do become available there, they're highly sought after."

    Townhouses in the historic district start at $1 million, according to Taggart. A 1,067-square-foot studio in the new loft building at 50 Bridge Street is priced at $480,000, while an 1,845-square-foot unit with terraces in the same building is going for $1.5 million, according to the Developers Group website.

    A two-plus-bedroom luxury apartment in a historic-district brownstone just rented for $3,000, said Taggart, and Craigslist has been advertising two Vinegar Hill rentals since late November: a two-bedroom unit in the newly developed 260 Water Street building for $2,200, and a one-bedroom at Water and Hudson for $1,350 per month.

    What to Check Out: The Vinegar Hill Historic District comprises century-old brownstones in three separate groups: along Front Street, at the corner of Gold and Water streets, and along Hudson Avenue between Front and Plymouth streets. The bright-yellow Dorje Ling Buddhist Center at Front and Gold streets looks a little like a car dealership bedecked with prayer flags, testifying to the quirkiness of the area, and the center occasionally opens its doors to the public. The former navy commandant's house also merits a look. The white, gated mansion at the cul-de-sac of Little and Evans streets boasts a sweeping view of the city—but it's now a private residence, owned since 1997 by a Rockefeller University neurobiology professor.

    Hangouts, Parks & Restaurants: Vinegar Hill lacks services. A tiny Fine Food supermarket, Chinese restaurant, and a deli sit opposite the Farragut Houses on York Avenue. Lano's Family Café on Bridge Street has typical diner fare, while its neighbor Los Papi's Restaurant serves up Spanish standards. The attractive storefronts of Hudson Avenue are screaming for a funky little café. But residents take advantage of DUMBO's burgeoning service industry—Superfine, Grimaldi's, Pedro's, and the DUMBO General Store are 10 minutes away by foot. Same goes for parks. The jewels of Brooklyn's waterfront, Empire–Fulton Ferry State Park and Brooklyn Bridge Park, lie just a short stroll down Plymouth Street.

    Politicians: City Councilman David Yassky, State Assemblymember Joan L. Millman, State Senator Martin Connor, and U.S. representatives Nydia Velásquez, Edolphus Towns, and Major Owens, all Democrats.

    Crime Statistics: The 84th precinct covers Vinegar Hill, DUMBO, and Downtown Brooklyn. As of November 28, the police report zero murders this year, down from one last year; five rapes, up from three this time last year; 193 robberies, down from 276; 131 felonious assault, down from 143; 159 burglaries, down from 165.

  2. #62

    Default 99 Gold Street

    Project # 23

    99 Gold Street
    89-107 Gold Street/240-248 Gold Street
    6 stories 70 feet (Conversion)
    Scarano & Associate Architects
    Dev-Kay Gold Properties LLC
    Residential Condominiums
    71 units 109,200 Sq. Ft.
    Under Construction 2004-2005




    http://www.scaranoarchitects.com/

    99 Gold Street is a renewal pioneer within the area's industrial landscape. An upscale loft conversion is the latest trend in stylish city living, which redefines the 19th-century concrete and block building, originally designed to house and supply New York's souvenir market. Following that industry's decline and decades of misuse and neglect, vast quality-of-life improvements are assured by this adaptive reuse.

    Given the value of its location, breathtaking views of both Brooklyn and Manhattan and its close proximity to public transportation, the building is being converted into 88 sleek, spacious 1 and 2 bedroom loft-style apartments with cutting edge design and state of the art finishes. All apartments, ranging from 600 sq ft studios and 2000 sq ft penthouses, have high ceilings, floor to ceiling windows and large balconies.

    As a result of this project and others that will soon follow, the area has been transformed into the ideal neighborhood for successful artists and professionals with a taste for urban living, and it provides another link in connecting Brooklyn's downtown neighborhoods.
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  3. #63

    Default 35-45 Front Street, 183 Water Street, 206 Front Street

    Project # 24

    35-45 Front Street
    10 stories
    Residential
    90 units 88,000 Sq. Ft.
    Boymelgreen Developers
    Proposed


    http://www.africa-israel.com/eng/US_010.asp

    Project Name: 35 - 45 Front Street (Nova Clutch)

    Location/Neighborhood: Brooklyn/DUMBO

    Address: 35 - 45 Front Street


    Project Objective: This project is ideally situated at one of the primary gateways to the "up and coming" DUMBO neighborhood. The location presents an excellent opportunity for both design and community building. Two blocks from the Hudson River , the development site is an assemblage of three separate parcels. A new luxury residential condominium project is planned and will include the full menu of signature A.I. & Boymelgreen amenities. A retail and parking component will also be included.

    Total Buildout sf: 88,000

    Use: Residential

    New Construction sf: 88,000

    Residential sf: 88,000

    Transportation: Direct driving access exists from the Manhattan and Brooklyn bridges with additional access via the Brooklyn Queens Expressway. Ferry transportation between DUMBO and Manhattan is a three-minute walk from the development site. Five (5) subway lines are conveniently located within walking distance, to include the A,C,F,2, and 3 trains.

    Approximate Completion: 12/2005


    Project #25

    183 Water Street
    183-187 Water Street/56 Jay Street
    Scarano & Associate Architects
    Residential
    Proposed


    Project#26

    206 Front Street
    7 stories 70 feet
    Karl Fischer Architect
    Dev-G.L. Realty
    Residential Condominiums
    33 units 46,000 Sq. Ft.
    Proposed 2005-2006


    Just a few more projects left. I'll also try and conjure up make a map to make the locations of these buildings clear.
    Last edited by Derek2k3; March 2nd, 2005 at 09:27 PM.

  4. #64

    Default

    Thats pretty admirable....26 projects...wow

  5. #65

    Default Empire Stores Redevelopment

    Project #27

    Empire Stores Redevelopment
    Water Street between Dock and Main Streets
    Walker Group
    Dev-Boymelgreen Developers
    Mixed use (restaurants, retail shops, art galleries and performance spaces)
    400,000 Sq.Ft.
    Proposed 2007





    http://www.theempirestores.com

    The Empire Stores offer both commerce and culture;
    showcasing local retail and dining traditions with the latest
    in international trends, ideas, and lifestyle.

    Overlooking and engaging Brooklyn Bridge Park.
    Establishing a 24-hour bustling destination.
    Creating the greatest special event venue in New York.
    Serving one of the fastest growing neighborhoods in the city
    Defining the historic character of the district.
    Creating a center for local arts and culture.

    The dramatic history and scale of this bold landmark
    structure sets it apart from every other retail and mixed-use
    development in New York City. This is not a shopping mall.

    Seven contiguous monumental buildings.
    Constructed over sixteen years, from 1869 to 1885.
    Original structures are in superb condition, featuring historic
    materials and details.
    Listed on the National Register of Historical Places
    Designated as a New York City Landmark.


    http://www.africa-israel.com/eng/US_007.asp

    Project Name: Empire Stores

    Location/Neighborhood: Brooklyn/DUMBO

    Project Objective: Majestically located on the waterfront between the Brooklyn and Manhattan bridges and clearly visible from Manhattan , the Empire Stores is a series of seven, three and four-story warehouses totaling approximately 400,000 sf. A.I. & Boymelgreen won the right to redevelop the existing buildings from the Brooklyn Bridge Development Corporation, a subsidiary of the State and City Economic Development Corporations. Empire Stores will include extensive space for retail , office, art galleries, cultural spaces, and a special public event space. The Empire Stores will become a major shopping destination in downtown Brooklyn and a hot spot for nightlife and dining.

    Total Buildout sf: 400,000

    Use: Commercial/Retail

    Renovation sf: 400,000 (landmark buildings)

    Transportation: Direct driving access exists from the Manhattan and Brooklyn bridges with additional access via the Brooklyn Queens Expressway. Ferry transportation between DUMBO and Manhattan is a three-minute walk from the development site. Five (5) subway lines are conveniently located within walking distance, to include the A,C,F,2, and 3 trains.

    Approximate Completion: 12/2006


    Brooklyn Waterfront Landmark to Be Remade
    by GLENN COLLINS
    December 3, 2003
    New York Times

    http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/sh...t=dumbo+empire

    It is called the Empire Stores, and for more than 50 years the cavernous, forbidding warehouse has been abandoned, a magnificent ruin between the Brooklyn and Manhattan Bridges along the East River.

    A signature of the Brooklyn skyline for at least 130 years that has transfixed residents and, to an extent, defined the waterfront, it has nonetheless resisted all efforts of developers, public officials and community stewards to reclaim it.

    Now, Empire State Development Corporation, owner of the warehouse, has, through a subsidiary, signed an agreement with Boymelgreen Developers to transform it into a $100 million gateway to Brooklyn from the East River.

    According to this plan, the echoing spaces, cobwebs and rusting iron shutters of the 400,000-square-foot structure, a city and state landmark in the neighborhood known as Dumbo, are to yield to a Chelsea Market-ish conglomeration of restaurants, retail shops, art galleries and performance spaces. Its opening is scheduled for 2007.

    The proposal has been met by skepticism from another builder, and watchfulness from the community, but the development corporation has expressed only jubilation. "We are taking back the waterfront, and this building, with two bridges as bookends, is a Brooklyn showcase," said Charles A. Gargano, chairman of the development corporation and of its state-and-city-run subsidiary, the Brooklyn Bridge Park Development Corporation, which will lease the property to Boymelgreen for 39 years.

    Mr. Gargano said that 63 firms expressed interest in the renovation, but in the end three submitted bids. "Boymelgreen had the most to offer, in terms of the proposal and the maintenance that will be involved," which, he said, amounted to "several million a year."

    The Brooklyn-based Boymelgreen is hardly an unknown, with 20 projects under development in the five boroughs, which represent an investment of more than $1.5 billion, including 23 Wall Street and 15 Broad Street in Manhattan.

    Both Gov. George E. Pataki and Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg have issued huzzahs. "Not only will these wonderful buildings be restored, they will be the prototype for supporting a park with community-friendly economic development," Governor Pataki said.

    And Mayor Bloomberg gushed: "The mix of office, retail, restaurant and gallery space in this historic structure will really make the waterfront park a destination, and enhance the growing Dumbo neighborhood."

    But the deal has been questioned by David C. Walentas, the developer who, years ago, launched the real-estate transformation of Dumbo — the acronym means Down Under the Manhattan Bridge Overpass — and whose control of millions of square feet of mixed-use space there has won him the sobriquet Mr. Dumbo.

    "I would be delighted if someone would do this, and quickly, because it would make my neighborhood more valuable," Mr. Walentas said of the development. "But it will sit there. And nothing will happen."

    Mr. Walentas, who was one of three developers vying for the Empire Stores revivification, contended that Boymelgreen had overbid for the right to develop the project. "My offer was substantially less," Mr. Walentas said, explaining that high rents at Empire Stores were unrealistic.

    However, James F. Moogan, president of the Brooklyn Bridge Park Development Corporation, defended the deal. "This is a realistic bid, and we have realistic expectations," he said, adding that Boymelgreen made a nonrefundable $1 million payment on signing the agreement. "That shows us they believe it's viable. This proposal underwent substantial financial analysis by city and state agencies."

    T. William Kim, the Empire Stores project developer for Boymelgreen, said that "this is one of our priorities, and there is no question that it will be completed." He said Boymelgreen, in partnership with an Israeli businessman, Lev Leviev, will put $40 million into the project and finance the rest of the $100 million with its customary investment partners.

    Empire Stores sits on landfill deposited in the late 18th century and early 19th century, which extended the reach of the Village of Brooklyn, the future borough's first civic settlement.

    A report written by the architectural firm Beyer Blinder Belle, said that the first warehouse buildings at the site, called the Empire Stores (as in storehouses) even then, date back to the 1850's. By 1869 or so, larger private warehouses built by a merchant, James Nesmith, and his son Henry already hugged the shoreline. The finishing touches came in 1886, three years after the Brooklyn Bridge was completed.

    Once a storehouse for spices and green coffee beans, the monolithic warehouse is actually composed of seven structures, and has load-bearing, two-foot-thick walls of brick masonry and interior walls of fieldstone. It was framed with massive first-growth lumber from America's primordial pine forest.

    In the 1880's, Herman Melville, toiling on Wall Street in the New York Customs House, would have seen the warehouse complex right across the harbor. But he never could have predicted that it would become Brooklyn's 21st-century counterpart of Moby Dick. The Empire Stores remained the great white whale of New York architectural preservation, since, as an industrial building, it flew below the radar of history.

    The warehouse declined with the pre-eminence of trucking and railway transportation, and was mostly abandoned in the 1950's. After brief ownership by Con Edison, Empire Stores was taken over by the New York State Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation in 1978.

    During the Lindsay administration there were proposals to transform it into a wholesale meat market. During the Koch administration, there were plans for a festival marketplace akin to the South Street Seaport, not to mention a lawsuit by Mr. Walentas against the city. Another development proposal was made in 1991, but went unheeded. In 1999 Mr. Walentas announced a plan to make the Empire Stores a centerpiece of a $300 million cultural and retail complex, but this galvanized community groups into opposing what they said was overdevelopment.

    These days, the Empire Stores, on Water Street between Dock and Main Streets, endures in Stygian darkness behind its iron shutters. The buildings still yield the perfume of spices and coffee-bean remnants still crunch underfoot; a flashlight reveals disintegrating floors and onetime workers' graffiti on the walls.

    The warehouse was declared a landmark inside and out by both the state and the city in the 1970's. "We want to keep as much of the historic interior as possible," said Jay Valgora, the design principal for Boymelgreen's restoration architect, WalkerGroup, part of the WPP advertising holding company.

    It is the largest preservation redevelopment attempted by WalkerGroup, which has developed projects in New York, Tokyo, and Bilbao and Salamanca, Spain. Mr. Valgora's design calls for a ground-floor grand arcade on the side overlooking the Manhattan skyline and the Brooklyn Bridge; a terrace and esplanade would allow access to cafes and retail stores, a mix somewhat like that at Chelsea Market, the successful arcade in Manhattan created from a former Nabisco cookie factory.

    He would also construct several glass-and-steel atriums coexisting with the old walls, creating courtyards spanned with glass bridges. Unlike the South Street Seaport, Mr. Valgora said, the space would "not be an evocation of Ye Olde New York." Instead, he said, "we're hoping for destination retail stores, such as unique Brooklyn design and furniture companies."

    Above the warehouse, atop a new public park on the roof, would be a curving sculptural structure that would be lit at night. "We hope," Mr. Valgora said, "it can become another symbol for Brooklyn."

    All of Mr. Valgora's architectural additions must be approved by the New York State Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation. And beyond that, the project must undergo an environmental impact study.

    The mixed-use proposal for the warehouse is part of a community-generated master plan from 2000, guiding the economic development of Brooklyn Bridge Park, a 67-acre stretch of waterfront between Atlantic Avenue and Jay Street that would be turned into a riverside promenade with recreational and cultural amenities and limited commercial development.

    The plan will thus be closely scrutinized by the community. Residents have opposed traffic-clogged streets and other threats they saw in more grandiose proposals. Mr. Moogan, president of the development corporation, said that Community Board 2 had been briefed on the Boymelgreen plan. He said, "We are committed to sustained public involvement," through the development corporation's 25-member citizen's advisory council.

    Marianna Koval, executive director of the Brooklyn Bridge Park Coalition, an alliance of some 60 community groups, said that the Empire Stores was "the jewel in the crown of this park." Having seen elements of the Boymelgreen plan, she said the coalition would monitor the development, but "is cautiously optimistic."

    Others in the neighborhood are more openly enthusiastic. "I would welcome other restaurants," said Buzzy O'Keeffe, who became a pioneer in the transformation of the Brooklyn waterfront after fighting for 12 years to be able to open the River Cafe in 1977. "My basic feeling is that any improvement down here is good for the area."


    This is a section of the warehouses not being developed...atleast commercially.
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  6. #66
    Forum Veteran
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    West Harlem
    Posts
    2,805

    Default

    ^That one there I think is the Tobacco Warehouse, Empire Stores are more north. I think.

  7. #67

    Default

    [QUOTE=Derek2k3]Project #27

    Empire Stores Redevelopment
    Water Street between Dock and Main Streets
    Walker Group
    Dev-Boymelgreen Developers
    Mixed use (restaurants, retail shops, art galleries and performance spaces)
    400,000 Sq.Ft.
    Proposed 2007




    It's actually approved; it is just currently is the process of design and acquiring stores

  8. #68

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Gulcrapek
    ^That one there I think is the Tobacco Warehouse, Empire Stores are more north. I think.

    Nope, those are the Empire stores

  9. #69

    Smile

    Well the photos I posted are in a separate gutted warehouse, right next to the redevelopment project. I just thought it was all the same complex.
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  10. #70
    Forum Veteran
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Garden City, LI
    Posts
    1,778

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Derek2k3
    Well the photos I posted are in a separate gutted warehouse, right next to the redevelopment project. I just thought it was all the same complex.
    You're right, these are the Empire Stores to be. It's across from Jacques Torres and next to the Villa building.

    The tobacco warehouse, I think, will be left open as is.

    http://www.bbpc.net/TobaccoWarehouse.html

  11. #71

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Kolbster
    Nope, those are the Empire stores
    Yup, as i said before

  12. #72

    Thumbs up

    Yes! Ive seen factories turned to shopping venues so many times in other cities, they are always successful and I think they’re terrific.

  13. #73

    Default 91 Hudson Avenue

    Project # 28

    91 Hudson Avenue
    91-93 Hudson Avenue
    3 stories 34 feet
    T. F. Cusanelli Architecture & Planning
    Dev-Vinegar Hill Group LLC
    Residential Condominiums
    3 units 6,112 Sq. Ft.
    Under Construction 2004-2005


    Scarano designed this superior unbuilt design.

    Scarano & Associate Architects

    http://www.scaranoarchitects.com/multifamily2.html

    91 Hudson Street is a design for new 2-family residences in the recently gentrified Vinegar Hill section of Brooklyn, Totaling at 5,000 square feet in area. This irregular shaped site help to create the solution you see.

    This playful and colorful design echoes the eclectic nature of the area, once an industrial park, which has evolved from proximity to the shipping-oriented East River. Today, the area has become a desirable residential neighborhood for the same reasons.

    The complex shapes of this building and its vibrant colors intensify the dramatic effect, which is made possible through the use of applied stucco, and the triangular lot shape. The apartments are duplexes with multi-level studio apartments at the ground level, and all have exterior recreation areas. The definition of “open space”, or “yard”, was expanded to create alternating enclosed and open areas – intimate gardens intertwined with diverse interiors, which are flexible and dynamic.
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  14. #74

    Default 9-17 Evans Street

    Last project for now...

    Project #29

    9-17 Evans Street
    3 stories 31 feet
    T. F. Cusanelli Architecture & Planning
    Dev-Vinegar Hill Group LLC
    Residential Condominiums
    3 units 6,112 Sq. Ft. (x5 buildings)
    Completed 2003-2005


    Just like the last project, Scarano designed something interesting and basura was built instead.

    Scarano & Associate Architects

    http://www.scaranoarchitects.com/multifamily2.html

    New Residential Development in the low density Navy Yard / Vinegar Hill section of Brooklyn redefines the boundaries of residential town homes by using modern materials in an old way.

    With a total area of 30,000 square feet, eight, two family homes with, private parking for each house was proposed for the site. The design attempts to depart from the wood clap board homes in the area introducing curved metal roofing with brick and aluminum cladding, echoing the industrial nature of the area.

    The emergence of the adjoining neighborhood of DUMBO has caused many people to consider this area their home. As the residents continue to pour in, many believe that Vinegar Hill possesses a quaint character not found in other more developed sections of Brooklyn. Narrow cobble stone streets, which wind around the Brooklyn Navy Yard and historic structures still remaining, create the charm that one finds in much less densely populated cities around the country.

    Evans Street projects get its charm from its scale and use of modern materials.
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  15. #75

    Default DUMBO/Vinegar Hill Map

    You can e-mail me if you'd like a larger version of the file or an Exel spreadsheet of all the projects.

    Project #1

    53 Bridge Street
    Scarano & Associates Architects
    Dev-Kay Bridge Properties /53 Bridge, LLC
    12 stories 162 feet 6 story addition
    130,740 Sq. Ft.
    Residential Condominiums
    Under Construction 2004-2006

    Project #2

    Beacon Tower
    85 Adams Street
    23 stories 314 feet
    Cetra/Ruddy Incorporated
    Dev-Boymelgreen Developers
    Residential Condominium
    77 units 115,424 Sq. Ft.
    Under Construction 2004-Summer 2006

    Project # 3

    The Nexus
    84 Front Street
    11 stories 120 feet
    Meltzer Mandl Architects of Manhattan
    Dev-Boymelgreen Developers
    Residential Condominium
    44 units 72,302 Sq. Ft.
    Under Construction 2004-Late 2005

    Project #4

    110 York Street
    6 stories 84 feet (2 story addition)
    Scarano & Associate Architects
    Commercial Office
    5,000 Sq. Ft. Addition
    Completed 2003-October 2004

    Project # 5

    River Hotel
    Main Street Pier, Brooklyn Waterfront
    9 stories 100 feet
    Ateliers Jean Nouvel
    Dev-Two Trees Management Co.
    Commercial Hotel
    250 Rooms 350,000 Sq.Ft.
    Proposed as Residential

    Project # 6

    NYC 2012 Voleyball & Handball Arena
    85 Jay Street
    Rafael Vinoly Architects
    Dev-NYC 2012
    Sports and Recreation
    13,563 sq feet (can't be right)
    Unbuilt

    Project #7

    J Condo
    100 Jay Street
    31/33 stories 337 feet
    Gruzen Samton Architects
    Dev-Hudson Companies Incorporated
    Residential Condominiums
    260/267 units 407,129 Sq. Ft.
    Proposed 2005-2006

    Project #8

    Bridgefront
    67/65-71 Front Street/42-44 Main Street
    10 stories 120 feet
    Elena Kalman Architect
    Dev-Boymelgreen Developers
    Residential Condominium
    21 units 37,160 Sq. Ft.
    Completed Early 2003

    Project #9

    The Bridges/The Bridge Street Condominium
    79 Bridge Street
    6 stories 70 feet (2 story addition)
    Scarano & Associate Architects
    Kay Bridge Properties/Howard Klaus Partnership
    Residential Condominiums
    37 units 51,141 Sq. Ft.
    Completed 2003


    Project #10

    133 Water Street
    12 stories 120 feet
    Scarano & Associate Architects
    Dev-Jack Guttman Partners
    Residential Condominium
    52 units 85,477 Sq. Ft.
    5.000 Sq. Ft. of Retail & Community Space
    Under Consruction 2003-2006

    Project #11

    10 Jay Street
    Ehrenkrantz Eckstut & Kuhn Architects
    16 stories (7 story addition)
    Proposed

    Project #12

    RiverFront
    57 Front Street
    7 stories 84 feet(Conversion)
    Elena Kalman Architect
    Dev-Boymelgreen Developers
    Residential Condominiums
    33 units 51,781 Sq. Ft.
    Under Construction 2004-2005

    Project #13

    Commodore’s Court
    85 Hudson Avenue
    5 stories 50 feet
    K & K Engineering
    Dev-The Constellation Group
    Residential Condominiums
    9 units 12,957 Sq. Ft.
    Completed Late 2004

    Projects #14-17

    Watchtower Residence Hall I
    85 Jay Street
    20 stories 222 feet
    Beyer Blinder Belle
    Dev-The Watchtower Bible and Tract Society of New York
    Proposed 2006

    Watchtower Residence Hall II
    85 Jay Street
    18 stories 195 feet
    Beyer Blinder Belle
    Dev-The Watchtower Bible and Tract Society of New York
    Proposed 2006

    Watchtower Residence Hall III
    85 Jay Street
    9 stories
    Beyer Blinder Belle
    Dev-The Watchtower Bible and Tract Society of New York
    Proposed 2006

    Watchtower Residence Hall IV
    85 Jay Street
    9 stories
    Beyer Blinder Belle
    Dev-The Watchtower Bible and Tract Society of New York
    Proposed 2006

    Project #18

    40 Main Street
    4 stories 67 feet(1 story addition)
    Simino Architects
    Mixed Use
    Completed 2002?

    Project #19

    Fulton Ferry Landmark Condominiums
    4 Water Street
    6 stories 76 feet
    Oaklander, Coogan & Vitto
    Dev-4 Water LLC
    Residential Condominiums
    13 units 24,142 Sq. Ft.
    Under Construction Summer 2004-2005

    Project #20

    37 Bridge Street
    10 stories 110 feet
    Scarano & Associate Architects
    Dev-Howard Klause
    Residential Condominiums
    60 units 103,077 Sq. Ft.
    Under Construction 2004-2006

    Project # 21

    65 Washington
    61-65 Washington Street
    13 stories 120 feet
    Stephen B Jacobs Group
    Dev-Two Trees Management
    Residential Rental
    54 units 62,857 Sq. Ft.
    Completed October 2001

    Project # 22

    38 Water Street
    38-62 Water Street
    16 stories 178 feet
    Beyer Blinder Belle
    Dev-Two Trees Management
    Residential Condominiums
    200 units
    On Hold

    Project # 23

    99 Gold Street
    89-107 Gold Street/240-248 Gold Street
    6 stories 70 feet (Conversion)
    Scarano & Associate Architects
    Dev-Kay Gold Properties LLC
    Residential Condominiums
    71 units 109,200 Sq. Ft.
    Under Construction 2004-2005

    Project # 24

    35-45 Front Street
    10 stories
    Residential
    90 units 88,000 Sq. Ft.
    Boymelgreen Developers
    Proposed

    Project #25

    183 Water Street
    183-187 Water Street/56 Jay Street
    Scarano & Associate Architects
    Residential
    Proposed

    Project#26

    206 Front Street
    7 stories 70 feet
    Karl Fischer Architect
    Dev-G.L. Realty
    Residential Condominiums
    33 units 46,000 Sq. Ft.
    Proposed 2005-2006

    Project #27

    Empire Stores Redevelopment
    Water Street between Dock and Main Streets
    Walker Group
    Dev-Boymelgreen Developers
    Mixed use (restaurants, retail shops, art galleries and performance spaces)
    400,000 Sq.Ft.
    Proposed 2007

    Project # 28

    91 Hudson Avenue
    91-93 Hudson Avenue
    3 stories 34 feet
    T. F. Cusanelli Architecture & Planning
    Dev-Vinegar Hill Group LLC
    Residential Condominiums
    3 units 6,112 Sq. Ft.
    Under Construction 2004-2005

    Project #29

    9-17 Evans Street
    3 stories 31 feet
    T. F. Cusanelli Architecture & Planning
    Dev-Vinegar Hill Group LLC
    Residential Condominiums
    3 units 6,112 Sq. Ft. (x5 buildings)
    Completed 2003-2005
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Click image for larger version. 

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    Last edited by Derek2k3; March 5th, 2005 at 07:41 PM.

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