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Thread: Downtown Brooklyn Development

  1. #1

    Default Downtown Brooklyn Development

    Downtown Brooklyn
    http://www.pacificislandtravel.com/n..._downtown.html

    This area is made up of Brooklyn Heights, Atlantic Avenue and Fort Greene, and stretches from the water to the Brooklyn Academy of Music, quickly moving from warehouses to brownstones to the staid buildings found in most any civic center. Getting there, if you choose to walk, could turn out to be the most exciting part of your trip.

    Downtown Brooklyn and Fulton Mall
    The eastern end of Montague is known as "Bank Row" – downtown Brooklyn's business center – and leads on to what is in effect the borough's Civic Center, with the end of the residential Heights signaled by the tall Art Deco buildings of Court Street. Across the road the sober Greek-style Borough Hall is topped with a cupolaed belfry; further east are the massive State Supreme Court and Romanesque post office, next to which stands a bronze statue of Henry Ward Beecher. There's little to linger for, but your tired feet should know that this is where to find the large Borough Hall subway station.
    Beyond the civic grandeur Fulton Street leads east, the principal shopping street for the borough as a whole. There are some good bargains to be found here, but all in all the streets – lined with fast-food franchises – can be a little depressing. What you will find here is Gage & Tollner, one of Brooklyn's most famous restaurants, which serves seafood and steaks in a setting determinedly left unchanged. However, the food doesn't come cheap. Another neighborhood landmark, and one more affordable, is Junior's on the corner of Flatbush and DeKalb avenues; the cheesecake is justly famous and their other dishes aren't far behind.

    Just south of Fulton Mall, Adams Street turns into Boerum Place, and at the corner of Schermerhorn you'll see a subway entrance that actually leads to the New York Transit Museum, housed in an unused station that hasn't seen a train for over forty years.

  2. #2

    Default The Toy Factory Lofts Condominium

    The Toy Factory Lofts Condominium: An Affordable Luxury Condo in the Heart of Downtown Brooklyn.

    Located at 176 Johnson Street in the vibrantly active neighborhood of Downtown Brooklyn
    www.thetoyfactorylofts.com

    At last, Luxury meets Affordability in Brooklyn’s most innovative condo, The Toy Factory Lofts. Located at 176 Johnson Street in the rising star neighborhood of Downtown Brooklyn, here is a condominium that successfully combines the highest standards of design with convenience, comfort and value.

    With great open spaces, high ceilings, wall-to-wall windows, hardwood floors and a wealth of exceptional amenities, The Toy Factory Lofts offer unparalleled opportunities for living and investing in Brooklyn.

    This unique condo brings in beautiful natural light and is accessible to public transportation, the BQE, the Manhattan Bridge and major business districts in Brooklyn and Manhattan.

    History: The Toy Factory Lofts Condominium: Framed in History, Developed for Today’s Discriminating Tastes.

    The Toy Factory Lofts are located in the building that was once home to Tudor Metal Products, where the popular Depression-era toy Budget Bank was invented by Elmer Sas in 1929. Two decades later, this is where Elmer’s son Norman created Electric Football, one of the country’s most beloved post World War II games. From the 1950’s through the 1980’s, Electric Football became more sophisticated and lifelike. In 1958, Electric Football introduced its first 3D plastic players and in the 1960’s, Tudor became an official NFL licensee. But by the late 1980’s, video games replaced the hands-on board and the company was purchased by Miggle Toys.

    This sturdy brick building that housed the old toy factory has been home to generations of entrepreneurial triumphs. Now in its next life, award-winning Scarano & Associates Architects has transformed it into 56 loft units with details that are well thought-out, stylish and intelligent.
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  3. #3

    Default

    Ha, i passed that building yesterday

  4. #4
    Forum Veteran
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    Default

    I remember about two years ago that building was kinda run down. I said at the time it could make a nice loft building but I doubt people would want to live right next to the projects. I guess they don't mind that much...

  5. #5

    Default

    Well, i think people are just pretty excited to be going into the new up and coming Downtown....You know, living near the projects didnt stop people from squabbling up residences near lincoln Center...but these projects have a different mentality though...pretty tough those are.

  6. #6

    Default Court House

    Developer: 125 Court Street, LLC
    Architect: Ismael Leyva Architects
    Structural Engineering: Rosenwasser/Grossman Consulting Engineers P.C.
    MEP Engineering: Robert Ettinger Associates
    Height: 128ft.
    Floors: 11
    Construction end: 2005

    http://www.emporis.com/en/cd/cm/?id=122877


    This high-rise building is still under construction [topped out]. Ismael Leyva Architects website is still under construction too http://www.ilarch.com/
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    Last edited by Archit_K; February 21st, 2005 at 03:38 AM.

  7. #7
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    Default

    I like CourtHouse, it's more than a simple brick building and I'm very fond of the ground floor treatment. The previous design by BBB was pretty bland (but what can we expect from them?).

  8. #8

    Default Toy Factory Lofts

    Project # 1

    Toy Factory Lofts
    176 Johnson Street
    8 stories 98 feet
    Scarano & Associate Architects
    Residential Condominiums
    56 units 64,000 Sq.ft.
    Completed 2004



    http://www.scaranoarchitects.com/

    176 Johnson Street is an 8 story, 64,000 square foot industrial building, which is being converted into a 56-family residential condominium. It is one of the first factory buildings in the downtown Brooklyn area that was rezoned by the Board of Standards and Appeals as part of a new master plan for the Brooklyn downtown redevelopment.

    In an attempt to preserve the continuous feeling of the currently uninterrupted 8300 square foot floors, with their large windows and elegant flared columns, and, in addition, in trying to avoid long corridors lined with doors, a layout was developed in which the columns are accentuated, acting as dramatic buffers between the public hall and intimate entranceways into apartments, broken off diagonally from hallway circulation. Full-height views around the columns enhance the dynamic sense of these entrance ways, while the main corridor ceiling is lowered to accommodate the tightly designed, highly efficient, mechanical core. Bathrooms and kitchens are also organized around a tight core, effectively reducing plumbing and mechanical costs and creating a continuous open main space that is rich with light and air.

    The apartments, ranging between 800 - 1,200 square feet, are flexible in their layout so that they can easily be converted into one, and even two bedroom apartments though sold as lofts.

    This building combines all the luxuries of fine city living, with private parking and storage rooms in the cellar accessed by a newly constructed ramp, and a commercial first floor, including a gym and other retail spaces. An elevator opens at the roof into a glass-enclosed 'sky-lobby" and a landscaped roof deck. With the up and coming development efforts in this neighborhood 176 Johnson Street will quickly stand out as one of the most successful residential ventures in the area.
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  9. #9

    Default 125 Court St.

    Quote Originally Posted by Gulcrapek
    I like CourtHouse, it's more than a simple brick building and I'm very fond of the ground floor treatment. The previous design by BBB was pretty bland (but what can we expect from them?).
    Hey, Gulcrapek can you post the previous design by BBB Architects?

  10. #10

    Default Bridge View Tower

    Projects #2

    Bridge View Tower
    189-197 Bridge Street
    18 stories 216 feet
    H2 Consulting
    Dev-Bridge View Tower, LLC
    Residential
    59 units 90,063 Sq. Ft.
    Under Construction 2004-2006
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    Last edited by Derek2k3; July 2nd, 2005 at 09:18 PM.

  11. #11
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    Default

    Never heard of that one, thanks.

    Archit: I forgot where it is, I think it was somewhere on the NYC rezoning pages though...

  12. #12

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Derek2k3
    Bridge View Tower
    197 Bridge Street
    18 stories 216 feet
    Zakrzewski + Hyde Architects
    Dev-Bridge View Tower, LLC
    Residential
    59 units 90,063 Sq. Ft.
    Under Construction 2004-2006

    Where is bridge street...in relevence to like Atlantic Ave, or the Bridge

  13. #13

    Default where is bridge st

    if you pull off the BQE at the tillary st exit, bear right, make a right onto front st, which is where 57 front and the bridgefront condos are, go about 4 blocks, then make a right onto bridge st and that's where the bridge st condos are.

    it's parallel to atlantic, about 15 blocks north in dumbo.

  14. #14

    Default The Court House

    Projects #3 & 4

    Court House Tower I
    211-233 Atlantic Avenue/125 Court Street
    11 stories 128 feet
    Ismael Leyva Architects
    Developer-Two Trees Management
    Residential Condominums
    321 units 495,638 Sq. Ft.(Combined)
    Under Construction Spring 2003-Early 2005


    Court House Tower II
    211-233 Atlantic Avenue/125 Court Street
    11 stories 128 feet
    Ismael Leyva Architects
    Developer-Two Trees Management
    Residential Condominums
    321 units 495,638 Sq. Ft.(Combined)
    Under Construction Spring 2003-Early 2005



    www.courthouseapts.com

    Gotham Gazette
    http://www.gothamgazette.com/community/33/news/964

    Long-Awaited CourtHouse Apartments Open for Rental
    by Brooklyn Eagle
    November 24, 2004
    Brooklyn Eagle


    ‘Everybody Gets a Free Y Membership’

    BROOKLYN HEIGHTS — Two Trees Management’s much-heralded CourtHouse apartments opened for leasing last Friday, November 12, as reported in the Daily Eagle.

    The CourtHouse, built on the site of a former parking lot, is a recent Two Trees project offering 320-brand new units conveniently located at 125 Court St. The building, on the corner of Court Street and Atlantic Avenue in Downtown Brooklyn, also includes the upcoming Brooklyn Central YMCA facilities and parking facilities.

    A leasing office (also at 125 Court St.) is accepting applications for the no-fee one- and two-bedroom apartments and studios. There are 42 layout variations throughout the building, which is set for completion in February of 2005, according to the website.

    Toby Klein, recognized last week for her efforts with Two Trees Management Co., commented to the Eagle, “I am happy to say that they don’t cut quality in building rentals. The have the same construction standards as they do in their luxury buildings.”

    Two model apartments are ready for viewing, according to a leasing office representative. “Everyone gets a free YMCA membership,” Klein added.

    Also under construction at the site is the new headquarters for Brooklyn’s oldest Y. Brooklyn Central Y was originally housed on Hanson Place, where it functioned with pool and athletic facilities for the first half of the 20th Century. When the building was sold, Brooklyn Central Y occupied several different rented sites around Downtown Brooklyn, but never had a real headquarters. That changes this spring, when the new Dodge Y branch will open with a six-lane pool and full gymnasium facility. The Dodge Family Foundation put up a portion of the funds that were required to build the $12 million facility. The board and community leadership of Brooklyn Central Y continues to raise money for completion of the new facility, set to open in sometime in the spring of 2005.

    The Brooklyn Central Y will own its facility, but the remainder of the building will be rental units managed by Two Trees.

    The units are a mix of studios and one- and two-bedroom apartments. They range in size from 465-472 square feet for a studio; 602-728 square feet for a one-bedroom; and 853-1,068 for a two-bedroom. According to the website, all units have nine-foot ceilings, oversized windows, red oak floors, Shaker maple wood cabinets, stainless steel appliances, including dishwashers, and granite counters.

    In addition to the onsite parking and access to the new YMCA, other building amenities include 24-hour doorman service and security, laundry facilities on every floor and common outdoor space.

    Pre-construction prices are in the $1,400-$3,600 range.

    There are also other pre-construction benefits, according to Klein, like one-month free rent with a one-year lease, or three months free rent with a two-year lease. More information is available at www.courthouseapts.com.


    The last attatchment is the Beyer Blinder Belle design Kris.
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  15. #15

    Default 49 Duffield Street

    Project #5

    49 Duffield Street
    4 stories 50 feet
    Scarano & Associates Architects
    Dev-Martin Handler Partners
    Residential Condominium
    7 units 9,000 Sq. Ft.
    Proposed


    Scarano & Associates Architects

    http://www.scaranoarchitects.com/

    A modest twenty five foot lot with a new seven apartment building is nested between homes on an existing block which has not seen new development in over thirty years. With a mandate to use the provisions of the Quality Housing program for R-6B zoning district, the building can maximize its potential yet maintain a high quality and be in context with its neighbors.

    A variety of apartment styles and types including flats, duplexes and lofts were incorporated into the design to provide for a wider array of unit types than what is typically found in these settings.

    To give the feeling of large interior spaces, both the building footprint and zoning envelope were maximized. The loft-style apartments with fifteen feet ceilings in the living areas also contain a flexible loft space that has a multitude of uses based on the buyers? preferred lifestyle. Most apartments have large outdoor spaces in the form of balconies or roof terraces.

    Flaunting a modern design that uses traditional materials, the building?s presence adds a tasteful twist to the streetscape. But its greatest contribution is in completing the missing link in the street wall.
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