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Thread: The New York City Subway

  1. #16

    Thumbs up

    Well, its about time!

  2. #17
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    The Bleecker St. station on the Lexington Ave. line is among those that will be renovated.

    A new passageway at the station will allow riders, for the first time, to transfer for free from uptown No. 6 trains to B, D, F or V trains at the Broadway/Lafayette station.
    YES!!!!!!!!

  3. #18

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    The MTAofficially cancencelled the #7 Line extension to the West Side. This may be because of the financial crisis or to put pressure on the stadium project.

  4. #19
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    ^What??? No way!!!

  5. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by mkeit
    The MTAofficially cancencelled the #7 Line extension to the West Side. This may be because of the financial crisis or to put pressure on the stadium project.
    How can the MTA scrap a project that the City not the TA were going to pay for?

  6. #21

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    Solicitation Number Due DateDescription

    C-26503

    5/9/05,12:00

    No. 7 Line Extension of running Tunnels-CANCELLED



    From the MTA-NYCT procurement page

  7. #22

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    nooooo!!

    i think it's financial problems too...

  8. #23
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    Perhaps the 42nd Street Light Rail is being given more weight. It is a much better option and would be alot cheaper, while creating a much more pedestrian friendly 42nd Street thoroughfare.

  9. #24

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    I highly doubt this is correct. Note the third paragraph, "the MTA has decided to complete the design process...". Bloomberg is using the 7 extension to leverage his stadium plan, and I really doubt it would be cancelled with no announcement or media coverage.

  10. #25

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    The 42nd St Light rail is some ones pipe dream. There is almost no official support for it.

    It is at the bottom of a long list of transit projects.

  11. #26

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    I think it would be a great idea, but i don't see it happening for various reasons, and this thread is going OT....

    If the 7 is to be extended, how far to? does it jsut loop around currently, or is the end of the tunnel a little distance from the station, or does the line lead onto another subway line?

  12. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by TLOZ Link5
    YES!!!!!!!!
    That station is very messed. Transfer only one direction to the 6 train. I second that Yes!!

  13. #28

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    No connections to other lines. A station at W 41st St between 9th and 10th Aves and one at 34th St to serve the Convention Center and the Stadium.

    The tracks would extend to 25th St.

  14. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by mkeit
    No connections to other lines. A station at W 41st St between 9th and 10th Aves and one at 34th St to serve the Convention Center and the Stadium.

    The tracks would extend to 25th St.
    That would work. Hopefully a connection passage to LIRR / A / C / E Lines

  15. #30
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    NYTimes
    May 24, 2005

    MetroCards? Certainly. But DeKalb Avenue? Don't Ask.


    Kevin Woods, a station supervisor, gave advice to LaVarta Mattox, a new station customer assistance agent, at the Herald Square station Monday during her weekday debut.

    By SEWELL CHAN
    Commuters at eight subway stations in Manhattan and Brooklyn discovered a new species of employee yesterday. Outfitted in burgundy jackets, vests and ties, and standing outside freshly painted booths, station customer assistance agents, as they are called, are supposed to be the new public face of the subway system.

    At the stations, the agents give directions and help riders use the electronic vending machines that sell MetroCards, which made tokens obsolete.

    They are there, first and foremost, to answer questions. It might seem unfair to put the tough questions to them on the first weekday of their debut, but this is the subway, after all.

    So in a brazenly unscientific effort, reporters devised a sort of pop quiz for the new agents. The results were mixed.

    One agent, Robert A. Carreras, aced the basics: the price of a seven-day unlimited-ride MetroCard ($24), a 30-day card ($76) and a seven-day express bus pass ($41). Mr. Carreras even volunteered that he knew the maximum amount of change the vending machines could return ($6).

    But then he was asked how to get to DeKalb Avenue. "DeKalb is in Brooklyn, right?" asked Mr. Carreras, who works at the Herald Square station. Indeed it is. The correct answer was to take a Brooklyn-bound B, Q or R train. The D and N trains, which also stop at Herald Square, go to Brooklyn but bypass DeKalb Avenue.

    Fabian Vega, a customer assistance agent at Union Square, was equally stumped when he was asked how to get to DeKalb Avenue. After hesitating, he suggested taking the A to Atlantic Avenue in Brooklyn, even though the A does not stop at Union Square. (The L, N, Q, R, W and Nos. 4, 5 and 6 trains do.)

    And from Atlantic Avenue? "You'd walk it," Mr. Vega said. "It's not too far." He added that he did not take a wide variety of trains, since he lives in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, which is served by the L, which goes directly to Union Square.

    Thomas A. Simmons, who was filling in as a supervisor at Herald Square, expertly helped customers operate the touch-screen vending machines, which he noted were particularly confusing for some tourists and elderly riders.

    Mr. Simmons correctly identified the longest line in the system (the A), but incorrectly guessed that there were 445 subway stations. (There are 468.)

    He knew the year the subway system was created (1904) but thought the three subway companies were unified in 1956. (Consolidation occurred in 1940.)

    Nearly every agent was able to identify, of all people, Jonathan Zizmor. "That's the dermatologist!" said Karen A. Ashley, who was working at 34th Street and Eighth Avenue, on the A, C and E lines. Dr. Zizmor's advertisements, which offer relief from pimples and wrinkles, have been a subway fixture for years.

    Such trivia aside, riders did have serious questions for the agents. Many sought directions to well-known landmarks. Others did not know how the vending machines worked or had questions about inserting money. (For example, machines will not accept $10 bills if they carry the old design, with the smaller image of Alexander Hamilton.)

    Several riders expressed fondness for the old token booths, which the agents can still use to retrieve maps and pamphlets and to operate computers that analyze whether the fare cards work properly.

    "It's a pain in the neck," Clarence Adams, 69, of Rockville Centre in Nassau County, said when told that he had to use a machine to buy his fare. "Everybody prefers to deal with a human being."

    Nixon Richman, 54, from Chelsea, muttered angrily when he was told that the agents could not make change. "You've got to be kidding," he said. To buy a card from a machine, he said, "you have to wait in line and figure it out. It's a hassle. It's absurd."

    Several agents said they appreciated the chance to assist customers directly, without the plexiglass barrier of the token booth to mediate the interaction.

    Raymond G. Leffler, a legal adviser to CORE, got a warm hello from a station agent, Karen V. Jones, when he stepped into one of the subway entrances at Union Square.

    "I liked the old way because I'm used to it," said Mr. Leffler, 72. But he added that he appreciated the help from Ms. Jones, whom he greets regularly during his daily commute, in using the vending machine. "I still want someone to look over my shoulder," he said.

    A final question from the pop quiz: What is the meaning of life?

    "To enjoy it to the fullest," Mr. Simmons replied, without hesitation.

    Ms. Ashley noted that the question was hardly related to transit but was still willing to venture an opinion: "Common sense. Not everyone has it."

    Colin Moynihan contributed reporting for this article.

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