Page 48 of 74 FirstFirst ... 3844454647484950515258 ... LastLast
Results 706 to 720 of 1096

Thread: The New York City Subway

  1. #706

    Default

    it would be, however i dont think that's what they're doing.

  2. #707

    Default

    here's the hole in question...from about 2 hours ago.

    seems they're patching it up.

  3. #708
    Forum Veteran Tectonic's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    New York City
    Posts
    3,673

    Default

    OK...Thanks for the picture. Yeah, I think if they were we'd find an announcement somewhere.

  4. #709

    Default

    I have to say, the new Subway construction not only makes the subway retain it's originality and artistic design, but also build striking, modern, sleek yet practical and safe designs. Also the future Jay St. (A)(C)(F) - Lawrence St. (M)(R) transfer is really practical for many commuters since it is a connection to Atlantic Hub and Dekalb Ave. Station made so much easier and there is no need to take the (F) to 4th Ave. - 9th St. or (A)(C) back to Manhattan, right at the correct point. Although, the service cuts and such, I would really want to see more practical infrastructure improvements and new contructions, it is a sacrafice yet a benefit for the future needs.

  5. #710

    Default

    i wouldn't consider the new construction at jay street to be all that modern or artistic lol, just utilitarian. i do like the birds though.

  6. #711

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by philvia View Post
    i wouldn't consider the new construction at jay street to be all that modern or artistic lol, just utilitarian. i do like the birds though.
    Well, you are kinda on point. Jay St is just practical, lol, ...

  7. #712
    Forum Veteran
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    New York City
    Posts
    1,752

    Default

    Five-year, $700M program will upgrade 150 subway stations with new lighting, sturdier platforms

    By Pete Donohue
    DAILY NEWS STAFF WRITER

    Tuesday, February 23rd 2010, 4:00 AM

    NYC Transit is spending $700 million on a blitz to fix up subway stations, officials said Monday.

    In a new program stretching over the next five years, 150 stations will get upgrades: new lighting, fresh coats of paint and sturdier platform edges, officials said.

    That's about triple the number of stations that received major rehabilitations in previous five-year construction plans, officials said.

    The Daily News reported Monday that eight of the city's busiest stations are set for a major face-lift.

    Transit officials aim to improve more stations with limited funds by being more selective about what repairs to make, said Fred Smith, acting vice president of capital plan management.

    About two dozen stations are slated for "renewal," or major overhauls, costing an average of $15 million, officials said.

    An additional 130 stations will get more limited upgrades, focusing on fixing their most defective components, railings and leaking ceilings.

    One of the first stations slated for a multimillion-dollar renewal is the A train stop at 104th St. and Liberty Ave. in eastern Queens.

    "When it rains, water comes in everywhere," said Santiago Tomas, a cabbie riding the rails Monday. "It's a big mess and it stays for days. No sneakers. You gotta wear your boots."

    Other affected stations are Seneca, Central and Forest Aves. and Fresh Pond Road on the M line; Pennsylvania, Van Siclen, Saratoga and Rockaway Aves. on the 3, and Hunters Point Ave. on the 7.

    NYC Transit President Tom Prendergast said the agency is trying to get "more bang for its buck."

  8. #713
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    7,476

    Default

    Experimental Clocks Tell Straphangers if the Wait May Soon Be Over

    By MICHAEL M. GRYNBAUM

    Heading downtown on the subway the other day, Nerissa Campbell bounded to the edge of an A train platform and assumed the standard straphanger’s stance: neck craned, back hunched, eyes peering down a dark tunnel. Where on earth was that train?

    The answer was hanging just a few feet above her head. A digital L.E.D. display, newly installed on the station ceiling, was counting down the minutes until the next express train would arrive — a basic bit of travelers’ guidance that has, until now, remained a rarity in New York.

    Electronic arrival-time clocks, a convenience long enjoyed by users of mass transit in London, Paris and Washington, are starting to trickle into New York City’s labyrinthine transportation network, part of a recent push to bring 21st-century technology to a system that runs very much as it did on its first day more than a century ago.

    Officials at the Metropolitan Transportation Authority say the clocks will revolutionize the way New Yorkers get around, soothing the usual anxieties that come with waiting for a bus or train that might never arrive.

    Three experiments are now active in the city, including a multimillion-dollar subway tracking system in the South Bronx and GPS-based bus timers along 34th Street that cost the city nothing because a potential vendor picked up the tab.

    Each has been promoted as a potential breakthrough for a problem that decades of planning and millions in investments have still not solved.

    But a recent tour of stations and bus shelters equipped with the clocks found riders reacting to the new technology with shrugs as well as smiles.

    And while the clocks are mostly accurate, they all have their quirks.

    Ms. Campbell, a jazz singer from Upper Manhattan, had been told by a digital sign at 145th Street that she would have to wait about six minutes for her A train. Eight minutes later, she was skeptical. “It lied!” she said, laughing. “They shouldn’t spend money if they’re not going to get it quite right.”

    The clock in question was part of a pilot program that began last month in four stations along the A and C lines. It uses existing track signals to approximate a train’s location, generating estimated arrival times that can be off by more than two minutes.

    Still, some trains arrive right on time, and the pilot cost only about $20,000 to install: spare change in the debt-laden world of mass transit in New York City.

    “Trains coming more often would be better,” said Lindsey Timko, 23, a filmmaker waiting on the same platform, “but knowing when they’re going to come is a good thing.”

    Many riders did not even notice the clocks, saying they never even thought to look up. At the entrance to the 145th Street station, most riders dug into pocketbooks and hurried through the turnstiles, seemingly oblivious to a countdown clock hanging from the ceiling.

    On the platform, even those who were aware of the new feature defaulted to the usual method of staring into the tunnel — suggesting that the unconscious rituals of traveling in New York do not easily give way.

    “It doesn’t change the way I commute,” said Bianca Ansari, a student at the Alvin Ailey dance studio, after a clock was pointed out to her at 145th Street. “We probably don’t trust them. As a New Yorker, you know that nothing works.”

    That is an attitude that Jay H. Walder, the chairman of the transportation authority, is trying to change. Mr. Walder, who gained prominence as a planner for the London transit system, has made the widespread implementation of countdown clocks a top priority since taking over the troubled transit agency last fall.

    “We all know the experience that we have, every one of us, getting down into the subway and not knowing what’s happening. Literally, looking longingly down the tracks to see if we can see a white light,” Mr. Walder said in an interview. “We can take some of the angst out of the subway and bus experience.”

    Knowing how many minutes until the next train will arrive seems like a simple task, but it has stymied New York’s transportation planners for decades.

    The city’s subway tracks are equipped with signals that follow trains through the system. That is why trains do not run into one another, or sometimes speed up or slow down to conform to schedules.

    But it is hard to harness the information from those signals, and harder still to convert it into an approximate arrival time that can be displayed for passengers. Signals are not routed to a central processing center, so controllers cannot see an entire route at once, and GPS and wireless signals do not travel well underground.

    Only a single subway line, the L train, has a complete system of working countdown clocks, and that required installing from scratch an entirely new computerized set of signals. Such a task can disrupt train service for years, not an immediate option in a city so dependent on its public transportation.
    But in the last six months, the transportation authority has tried out several new approaches.

    Besides the A and C line pilot, eight stations in the South Bronx along the No. 6 line have been equipped with screens that display waiting times for the next four trains heading into the station. An automated voice makes periodic announcements — “The next Brooklyn-bound train will arrive in three minutes”— and the system can differentiate between trains heading to Parkchester or to Pelham Bay Park.

    The system, which cost $213 million to implement, works by rerouting signals to a central control center in Midtown that can generate an approximate waiting time using a computer algorithm. That information is then sent back to a communications room at each local station, where it is transmitted to an electronic sign. The signs and a revamped public address system cost an additional $171 million to install. An unscientific survey found that most of the trains arrived almost exactly on time. A few trains mysteriously dropped off the display, and the clocks occasionally jumped around. (For instance, an eight-minute wait suddenly became four.) But when the signs flashed “0 min,” signaling an arrival, a train was almost always entering the station.

    “Since it got put up, I find myself really relying on it,” a passenger named Keisha Malcolm said as she waited for train at East 149th Street. “Before you had to wait and see.”

    “I was surprised to see them, especially here in the Bronx,” said Mercedes Guzman, who commutes to work from the station. She finds the signs helpful, although she says the automated announcements, which sometimes occur every 30 seconds, are annoying. “The thing I don’t care for is the man talking,” she said.

    The authorities are hoping to expand this system within a year to the rest of the numbered subway lines, except for the No. 7. That would bring clocks into four of the system’s busiest stations. But the lettered lines will not receive the clocks until at least 2014.

    Bus riders got their own clocks last summer at bus shelters along 34th Street in Midtown, serving the M16 and M34 crosstown lines. These clocks use GPS devices to track bus locations, part of a year-long pilot provided to the city at no cost by Clever Devices, which runs a similar system in Chicago.

    A recent survey found the clocks were mostly accurate to within 30 seconds, although many of the passengers chose to peer down the street anyway.

    “This is New York City, nothing runs on time,” Leonora Berisaj said as she waited for an M34 bus that took 10 minutes to arrive. “It’s not about the clock,” she added. “It’s about the bus.”

    http://www.nytimes.com/2010/03/08/ny...l?ref=nyregion

  9. #714
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    7,476

    Default

    Subway Station of the Future Opens on Upper West Side

    April 5, 2010, by Joey



    Yes, it's incredibly late to the party, and yes, it's been value-engineered, but the MTA's overhaul of the ancient 96th Street subway station at Broadway still ended up with that cool glassy curved headhouse, which opened today! A Curbed tipster just sent along some spy shots. Heading down into the bowels of the 1, 2, 3 just got classy!



    And broker-blogger Malcolm Carter files this shot:



    96th Street Subway Headhouse Now Open! [Westside Independent]
    96th Street Subway Station coverage [Curbed]

    http://ny.curbed.com/archives/2010/0..._side.php#more

  10. #715
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    7,476

    Default

    Brooklyn Heights Townhouse is Actually a Decoy

    April 13, 2010, by Joey



    Which of these Brooklyn Heights brownstones is not like the other? Here's a hint: It's the one with the word FAKE and a big red arrow pointed at it. Yesterday the Brooklyn Eagle ventured inside an unnamed three-story brownstone on a cobblestone block that is not a single-family townhouse, but rather a secret subway exit:
    Located in the tunnel just east of the river, the exit disguised as a brownstone leads to a grimy-lit set of metal stairs that ascend past utility boxes and ventilation shafts into a windowless room with a door. If you opened the door, you would find yourself on a stoop, which is just part of the façade.
    This proved to be way too enticing for one Curbed tipster, who began to investigate.

    He writes:
    It could only be on three streets. I nailed it halfway up the first one I checked. Red house, black windows, looks like no one at all lives there. It reminds me of the automated parking garage in Hoboken that is supposed to blend into the neighborhood look/feel but doesn't quite cross the Uncanny Valley.
    The suspect is 58 Joralemon Street, and our tipster is right. Though the Eagle cited security concerns as a reason for all the secrecy, the location of the emergency stairway (one of several in the neighborhood) is more of an open secret. PropertyShark records list the MTA in the ownership records for 58 Joralemon, and one website calls it "the world's only Greek Revival subway ventilator." One Joralemon Street resident, who was aware of the faux-townhouse, tells us, "I don't think it's a commonly known thing. Just a weird Brooklyn Heights story." So why can't the Second Avenue Subway ventilators blend in just as well? Here's PropShark's file photo of the townhouse that isn't:



    Subterranean Police Presence Protects Subways From Terror [BK Eagle]

    http://ny.curbed.com/archives/2010/0...decoy.php#more

  11. #716
    Chief Antagonist Ninjahedge's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Rutherford
    Posts
    12,773

    Default

    That is EXTREMELY cool.

    So many of the other utilities can't seem to blend in, they have to look like cinderblock fortresses or glass people-quariums.... :P

  12. #717

    Default

    I think there is a commenter there who brought up the fact that the MTA plans these huge ugly vents for the Second Ave subway when this proves it is possible to subtly integrate them into a neighborhood.

  13. #718

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Ninjahedge View Post
    That is EXTREMELY cool.

    So many of the other utilities can't seem to blend in, they have to look like cinderblock fortresses or glass people-quariums.... :P
    I wonder where else in the world that such a dummy facade technique is employed.

    In London, there is a 'fake' building at 23/24 Leinster Gardens which was built to retain the street face when an underground line was being built in 1868;
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/abandon...27908/sizes/l/
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/abandon...23786/sizes/l/

    A common prank is to order pizzas and other takeaway food for the address.

  14. #719
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    UrbanToronto.ca
    Posts
    371

    Default

    Toronto Hydro does it a lot for electrical transformer stations. There are even 1950's ranch houses done up this way.

  15. #720
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    7,476

    Default

    Next Secret Subway Townhouse Planned for Greenwich Village

    May 14, 2010, by Joey



    Now that we're hip to the MTA's games, where might the next subway ventilation plant masquerading as a quaint townhouse pop up? All signs point to Greenwich Village, and specifically Mulry Square, the fenced-off triangle of land where Greenwich Avenue meets Seventh Avenue South. But the emergency facility is a particularly sensitive topic for two reasons: The site lies within a historic district, and the Tiles for America 9/11 memorial still covers the fence. Local officials have been getting peeks at the MTA's design for the fake townhouse, and The Villager reports that the early reviews aren't very enthusiastic:
    What the agency has created is a garish-looking “faux-cade” — a fake townhouse facade on two sides — according to a person who saw the plan. Basically, it’s a building the same size as its neighbors, but with the aforementioned “faux-cade” hanging off of it — and extending 8 feet in the air above it. “You can actually look through windows to nothing. There’s nothing — there’s not even windows,” said the horrified source. Word has it that, even without the facade, the structure is a complete clunker. “They’ve changed the massing, it’s too tall,” said the source. “It’s solid concrete. It’s Brutalist."
    Such a tease! What's this kooky thing going to look like? Well, last summer the MTA showed off a variety of potential designs to community groups, including one faux-cade structure, before the agency headed back to the drawing board. Here's how it looked back then:



    Though the design has since been updated, we're still thinking it's not going to turn out as well as the famed Brooklyn Heights imposter.

    How faux can you go? [The Villager]
    MTA Venting in Greenwich Village Over 9/11 Tribute Tiles [Curbed]

    http://ny.curbed.com/archives/2010/0...llage.php#more

Similar Threads

  1. Second Avenue Subway Project
    By NYguy in forum New York City Guide For New Yorkers
    Replies: 610
    Last Post: July 6th, 2016, 11:18 AM
  2. Farewell, Subway Token
    By Kris in forum New York City Guide For New Yorkers
    Replies: 16
    Last Post: March 27th, 2004, 11:17 PM
  3. World Subway Systems
    By TLOZ Link5 in forum Photography and Travel
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: March 6th, 2004, 10:55 PM
  4. New Subway Trains for NYC
    By Chris2005 in forum New York City Guide For New Yorkers
    Replies: 16
    Last Post: July 23rd, 2003, 09:55 PM

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  


Google+ - Facebook - Twitter - Meetup

Edward's photos on Flickr - Wired New York on Flickr - In Queens - In Red Hook - Bryant Park - SQL Backup Software