Page 10 of 17 FirstFirst ... 67891011121314 ... LastLast
Results 136 to 150 of 244

Thread: Lower East Side Development

  1. #136

    Default

    Would love to see them get the funding needed for this. As far as wifi/cellphone, I'm sort of reticent about that. Maybe a bit old-fashioned. It would be nice to see this spot stay what I call a quiet zone, but I know one of the draws for it will be that it does have those capabilities. That could also be considered "yuppie-fication."

  2. #137
    Forum Veteran
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    West Harlem
    Posts
    2,805

    Default

    I think this is the Allen St. Hotel, 10/16/11



    Not sure what this is but it's north of Kenmare St.



    And this... this is disgusting. Look at those joints.


  3. #138
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    NYC - Downtown
    Posts
    32,654

    Default

    Williamsburg Specials creeping West.

  4. #139
    Fearless Photog RoldanTTLB's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Broomfield, CO
    Posts
    2,910

    Default

    I dunno, I'm pretty sure cheap builds like this hit Chinatown then headed for Williamsburg. The older ones just look so decrepit already, you wouldn't know they were only 10 years old.

  5. #140
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    7,476

    Default

    Well this...thing...really fits in well with its surroundings...NOT .


    Stalled Lower East Side Hotel Gets New Architect, Renderings

    by Sara Polsky



    Developer Serge Hoyda got conditional community board approval in February 2011 to revive the long-stalled 163 Orchard Street, originally planned as Stories_NY, a Grzywinski+Pons-designed hotel for the "young, un-moneyed traveler." There have been no visible signs of progress, but Bowery Boogie reports on a new development: ADB Associates is now the project's architect, and with the change comes a pair of fresh renderings. Bowery Boogie describes it as "gut-wrenching, vomit-inducing…you get the idea." Indeed we do.



    Construction jumpstarted on 163 Orchard Hotel; Renderings Released [Bowery Boogie]

    http://ny.curbed.com/archives/2012/0...rings.php#more

  6. #141

    Default

    *sigh*

  7. #142

    Default

    Wow. Now I am blind.

  8. #143
    Fearless Photog RoldanTTLB's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Broomfield, CO
    Posts
    2,910

    Default

    So sadly par for the course for this area. If I recall correctly, there's a similar Fairfield Inn across the park from this site.

  9. #144

    Default

    It makes my blood boil that the city expends so much time and energy on cutting down to size top-notch projects, architects and developers (Nouvel's Torre Verre, Adjmi's Meatpacking office building, etc.) ... and yet when the $%&$ really hits the fan -- as in some of these finger buildings, or the awful Kaufman/Poon hotels going up in Lower Manhattan or the Garment District -- the city seems powerless.

    I know this is a question of zoning, of historic districts, of landmarks, etc. But, really. It's just plain absurd that some areas should have such a high bar to jump over while just a street or two away, in essentially the same neighborhood, there are no standards whatsoever. That binary, all-or-nothing approach is really showing its inadequacies when you look at the fleet of Kaufmans going up across the city while so many decent projects face much tighter vetting (or, for that matter, any vetting at all) just because they happen to be on the "wrong" block. The city needs greater consistency in the criteria and standards used to give building permits, and having seas of Poon Specials and Kaufman Kontraptions is not in New York's interests, especially when building higher-quality architecture would add, what? 15? to construction costs...

  10. #145

    Default

    With the re-publication/update of this article, I think they'll have no problem raising the rest.

    NYC’s LowLine underground park raises cash on Kickstarter



    By Dylan Stableford | The Sideshow – 8 hrs ago

    An artist's virtual rendering of the LowLine. (Delancey Underground)

    A group of New Yorkers, inspired by the transformation of an abandoned railway on the west side of Manhattan into the High Line urban park, are hoping to do something similar on the Lower East Side -- only this time, underground.
    Nicknaming their project LowLine, organizers at the Delancey Underground want to turn an abandoned trolley terminal below their neighborhood into what they say would be New York City's first underground community green space.
    The 60,000-square-foot, 1.5 acre site -- which is controlled by the Metro Transit Authority -- was built in 1903. It originally housed streetcars destined for Williamsburg, but has been out of operation since 1948.
    Co-founders Dan Barasch and James Ramsey have raised more than $64,000 on Kickstarter.com, with a goal of $100,000 by April 6, enough to fund a full-scale demo -- or "mini-LowLine" -- of the solar technology that would power the underground park.
    "We're technically building the most kick-ass demonstration of solar technology in New York City memory," Barasch told Yahoo News.

    According to Ramsey, an architect and former NASA engineer, the park would use high-tech solar technology to gather natural sunlight and direct it using fiber optic cables to allow plants and trees to grow underground.
    The project has already attracted more than 675 backers, though only two have pledged more than $10,000 -- a donation that gets you VIP-partner status plus a gourmet dinner cooked by "chef" Ramsey.
    Barasch said the LowLine would likely cost tens of millions and take years to build, but that the success of the High Line showed that it is possible to move ahead without relying entirely on public funding. (The High Line opened in 2009 with city support -- but the project was started by a nonprofit group in 1999.)
    The group says they've also had preliminary conversations with city and MTA officials.
    "They are intrigued by our proposal but are interested in our developing a business case for the location which supports their real estate objectives alongside our community development goals," Barasch said. Who would own the underground park, he added, "remains unclear at this stage."

    The development of the High Line received some support from celebrities, including Ed Norton and David Byrne -- and the LowLine organizers say they are gathering the same. "We have a growing number of supporters in the celebrity category," Barasch said, but declined to name them.
    "We're doing all we can to build community support, from every small business, real estate owner, local resident, student, or artist to all elected officials," Barasch added. "If we move ahead, it will be with the support of the Lower East Side community, and it will be something that will belong to everybody."


    http://news.yahoo.com/blogs/sideshow...165700412.html

  11. #146
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    7,476

    Default

    Residents Do Not Want SPURA to Bring Big Box Retailers to the Lower East Side

    by Will Giron
    • Email


    Photo via Bowery Boogie


    Last year, Inhabitat reported on the Seward Park Urban Renewal Area (SPURA), a massive redevelopment project in the Lower East Side for one of the city’s largest underdeveloped plots of land centered on Delancy and Essex. While official plans revealed earlier this month promised new housing, retail space, and a 10,000 square foot park, these may come at a price that many residents are unwillingly to pay: the construction of big box retail stores.



    In an op-ed piece, David Bergman, an architect and long time of the LES, criticizes Community Board 3, and the idea that the LES requires an “anchor tenant,” the theory that a large name brand store is needed in order to attract shoppers to an area. Bergman argues that the idea is detrimental to the neighborhood because many locally owned small businesses would suffer an economic blow. Bergman also states that cultural landmarks like the Essex Street Market would face demise, and affordable housing in an area marred with gentrification would be compromised.

    Bergman believes that an anchor tenant (a theory originally from the shopping mall industry) will have the reverse effect of attracting shoppers to the LES; the concept does not apply to an urban situation, where there are already thousands of local residents in the area. Bergman also argues that in today’s economic situation, the anchor tenant model isn’t even working in suburban areas, where it was first applied and originally thrived.

    The addition of big box retail chains in the area could damage the vibrancy, and culture of the local community. “The level of street life outside a long row of Bed, Bath & Beyond or Home Depot windows is nothing like what occurs where you have a different storefront entrance every 20 feet or so, where the owner hangs out and knows what’s going on in the neighborhood,” writes Bergman. “The inside is different, too; the atmosphere in the tiny local pharmacy nearby– where they know us and come out from behind the register to greet our dog — doesn’t compare to the antiseptic and Muzak’ed Rite Aid a few blocks away.”

    Big box stores often portray the illusion of more service at lower prices, but Bergman argues not only are the goods usually low quality and generic, they also cause neighborhoods to lose jobs and income. Should a big retail store not make enough profit and close down (a real possibility in the current economy), it would be disastrous for the community, leaving behind empty real estate and no shopping alternatives.

    “I’m by no means against change or progress,” wrote Bergman. “And I’m totally in favor of mending the ugly gap in the LES, but the solution is not in bringing in discredited formulas from elsewhere. There’s a reason we love living here; let’s build upon that.”

    Many local residents seem to agree. As a local wrote in the comments section of the article, “There’s plenty of hardware stores and building supply stores around, so we don’t need a Home Depot. Essex market covers groceries. [...] 
Big box stores over there would also present a traffic nightmare that couldn’t even be described. Maybe they could do something interesting like make it a park for the millions of families on the LES? And please… NO Walmart!”

    Via Bowery Boogie


  12. #147
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    7,476

    Default

    LES Gets More

    Details for Seward Park mixed-use renewal released.

    by Branden Klayko


    A conceptual rendering illustrating how the SPURA site could be redeveloped. Courtesy NYCEDC

    Plans to redevelop a seven-acre swath of surface-parking leftover from a Robert Moses clearance job on Manhattan’s Lower East Side were detailed at a March 8 meeting of the Community Board 3 (CB3) Land Use Committee as the project prepares to enter its ULURP public approval process.

    City plans show up to 1.65 million square feet on the nine parcels of the Seward Park Urban Renewal Area (SPURA), housed in groups of mid-to-high-rise towers designed to knit the historic neighborhood fabric with adjacent Moses-era towers in the park. The program also calls for a mix of 900 housing units, up to 650,000 square feet of commercial and retail space, and 500 underground parking spaces. A 10,000-square-foot park is planned on pedestrian-scaled Broome Street, running through the center of the site. “We see Broome Street as an opportunity to create an active corridor and we would encourage a retail corridor,” senior vice president of New York City’s Economic Development Corporation (EDC) David Quart said at the meeting. Officials also indicated their preference to relocate and expand the Essex Street Market for higher visibility to the corner of Essex and Delancey streets.


    The nine parcels comprising the SPURA site (red) sit between the historic Lower East Side
    neighborhood and a series of towers in the park.


    Officials from EDC presented the updated plans more than a year after the community-established guidelines called for a mixed-use, mixed-income neighborhood that promoted an active and diverse street life.

    While the city met most of the neighborhood’s guidelines, several key concerns remain, including maximum size of retail and affordable housing. CB3 sought to cap retail size at 30,000 square feet, but the EDC insisted a larger anchor tenant such as a hotel, movie theater, or big-box store is needed for financial success of the project. The city’s plan calls for 50 percent affordable housing over 60 years while the neighborhood hopes to make it permanent. These issues will likely play a large role in the public review process. “It is very important that we as a community advocate for permanent affordable housing,” Manhattan Borough president Scott Stringer said at the meeting. “I’m going to call on the City Council and the City Planning Commission and HPD to make sure [that happens],” he added.

    As part of the ULURP process, the city will seek a rezoning for a commercial overlay allowing retail space in residential zones, and acquire special permits allowing building mass to be shuffled around to harmonize with the scale of the neighborhood. A public meeting on April 18 marks the beginning of the process and CB3 will vote on the project in May. A request for proposals from developers could be distributed in early 2013.

    http://www.archpaper.com/news/articles.asp?id=5977

  13. #148
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    NYC - Downtown
    Posts
    32,654

    Default

    Merry: By all your great postings here at WNY you make it almost unnecessary to check out the various other architectural blogs.

    Many thanks!

  14. #149
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    7,476

    Default

    Thank you L1, that was unexpected . You're welcome.

    I know many folks don't have the time (or inclination) to check out all the usual places, or the internet in general, so I figure if I'm able to, and I'm the first "reporter" on the scene, it's helpful to collect stories in our favourite place .

    (I'm convinced there are less hours in the day now than there used to be, though, LOL!)

  15. #150
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    7,476

    Default

    Oh, god....


    Architect Wants to Cover Big-Box SPURA Stores With Ski Slope

    by Sara Polsky



    Neighbors have been resistant to the idea of putting big-box retail within SPURA, the undeveloped Lower East Side parking lots that have been earmarked for redevelopment for the past 40 years. (Exactly what will happen to SPURA's commercial space is still up for debate.) Would locals be any more open to big-box chains if the stores were topped by giant artificial mountains on which people could hike in summer and ski in winter? Probably not. But it makes for an entertaining thought experiment from architect Ju-Hyun Kim. Kim tells Co.Design that SPURA so far is "conventional development, which can be planned in anywhere in the world….There should be a new attraction, some new shock and awe, but one that's sustainable." Or maybe the fact that SPURA's happening at all provides enough shock and awe.

    Here's the big box mountain in summer:



    Architect Wants to Link NYC's Big-Box Stores With a Fake Mountain [Co.Design]
    Manhattan Mountain [juhyunkim.com]

    http://ny.curbed.com/archives/2012/0...slope.php#more

Page 10 of 17 FirstFirst ... 67891011121314 ... LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Greenways and Waterfront Development
    By Edward in forum New York City Guide For New Yorkers
    Replies: 198
    Last Post: July 21st, 2015, 01:30 AM
  2. Fading Into History: The Jewish Lower East Side
    By Kris in forum New York City Guide For New Yorkers
    Replies: 16
    Last Post: September 8th, 2014, 09:44 PM
  3. Transit Plan for Lower Manhattan
    By amigo32 in forum New York City Guide For New Yorkers
    Replies: 51
    Last Post: March 21st, 2008, 01:24 PM
  4. A Stroll in Lower Manhattan
    By ddny in forum New York City Guide For Visitors
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: January 23rd, 2003, 10:40 AM
  5. Manhattan Leads a Surge in Lower-Cost Hotels
    By Edward in forum New York City Guide For Visitors
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: October 8th, 2002, 01:00 AM

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  


Google+ - Facebook - Twitter - Meetup

Edward's photos on Flickr - Wired New York on Flickr - In Queens - In Red Hook - Bryant Park - SQL Backup Software