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Thread: Lower East Side Development

  1. #211

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    As I've thought for a long time, it's time for Sheldon Silver to go.

  2. #212
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    Hard to depose The King.

  3. #213
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    Not that some won't seize the moment and try ...

    Citing NYT story, Lalor calls Silver a ‘segregationist’

    TIMES UNION
    Capital Confidential
    March 24, 2014

    Republican Assemblyman Kieran Michael Lalor spices his latest request for Speaker Sheldon Silver to resign with with charge that the Democrat’s involvement in development plans for a long-vacant lot in his Lower East Side district — the subject of a comprehensive narrative by Russ Buettner in the New York Times this past weekend — amounts to him using “the levers of bureaucracy and political favors to pursue segregation.”

    The Times detailed how Silver and William Rapfogel, the scandal-tarred former leader of the Metropolitan Council on Jewish Poverty, tried to steer development of the tract away from affordable housing, which could have changed the demographics of Silver’s district; the Speaker’s defense is that he was simply trying to ensure that the desires of the community were heard.

    The story went online as state Hispanic leaders gathered for the Somos el Futuro gathering in Albany.

    Silver’s spokesman had no immediate comment on Lalor’s charge.

    From Lalor’s statement:

    “Right now, the ‘four men in a room’ are deciding on New York’s $140 billion budget and one of them has spent almost 40 years systematically working to keep minorities out of his neighborhood,” said Lalor. “This latest Silver revelation alone should be enough for Governor Cuomo to call for Silver’s resignation. When you add it together with Silver’s history of scandal after scandal, it’s hard to see how any elected official could stand by Silver. How can the governor continue to work with this man?”

    According to the New York Times article, revelations about Silver’s segregationist activities came to light due to the indictment of his crony William Rapfogel: “The arrest cast new light on a relationship about which little was known beyond the obvious: Mr. Silver has funneled millions of public dollars to the organization that Mr. Rapfogel led, and he employs Mr. Rapfogel’s wife, Judy, as his chief of staff.”

    The Times described Silver and Rapfogel’s efforts to keep minorities out of their neighborhood as follows, “Mr. Silver and Mr. Rapfogel steadfastly opposed any mention of affordable housing, which would have altered the demographics of the neighborhood and put Mr. Silver’s political base in question. And Mr. Silver appears to have occasionally misrepresented the desires of his Chinese and Hispanic constituents in conversations with city officials to quash housing plans for the site.”

    Since the late 1970′s Silver has blocked affordable housing plans for a Manhattan lot that was cleared in 1967. The lot had housed low-income apartments with mostly Hispanic families. When New York City razed the apartments, the families were promised that new low-income housing would be built. Instead, the 20 acres remain vacant. The story reported Silver’s objective was to preserve the all-white makeup of the neighborhood.

    The New York Times article quotes Frances Goldin, a leader in the Lower East Side Joint Planning Council, who said, “They would rather have the vacant lots and rats than have minority people there.”

    Lalor continued, “Silver’s obstructionism had one purpose, preserving ethnic homogeneity. He’s used the levers of bureaucracy and political favors to pursue segregation. It’s an ugly policy that favors a vacant 20 acre lot over development because Silver wants to keep minorities out of his neighborhood. That has no place in New York government. Governor Cuomo knows that. It’s time he had the courage to tell Silver to go.”

  4. #214
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
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    Unveiled Essex Crossing Park is Basically For People-Watching

    by Zoe Rosenberg



    Renderings via TLD from West 8.

    New details have arisen for an Essex Crossing park that will stretch 15,000-square-feet from Clinton to Suffolk streets along Broome Street. Designers West 8 unveiled their plan for the space last night before a Community Board 3 subcommittee to positive reception. The park will be only 35-percent planted, with the rest of the space arranged into tons of seating alcoves and "passive" community space. The planted portion will feature native species of "trees, shrubs and bedding plants, arranged in a way to create individual 'coves' that can be used for multiple purposes," reports TLD. The park will also have a play area for the youngins and a large, fixed community table. Like the pedestrian plazas in Herald Square, the park will also have movable chairs and tables, and a kiosk that provides visitors with information about the neighborhood. The park, which will kick-off construction in March 2015 and is expected in 2017, will be cared for by community members.



    Essex Crossing to Have Play Area, Native Plantings, Abundant Seating [TLD]

    http://ny.curbed.com/archives/2014/0...lewatching.php

  5. #215
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    Bottom-up Urbanism

    What's next for the Lowline, Manhattan's subterranean park.

    by Henry Melcher


    The Lowline. Courtesy The Lowline

    When James Ramsey and Dan Barasch set out to turn a defunct trolley terminal underneath Manhattan’s Lower East Side into an open, airy park, they launched a Kickstarter. It was 2012 and they needed $100,000 to build a full-scale mockup of Ramsey’s “remote skylights” which would collect natural sunlight at the surface and funnel it into the 60,000-square-foot site through fiber optic tubes. If it worked, there would be enough light to sustain photosynthesis.

    The team met its goal in six days, and ultimately exceeded it by more than $55,000. The installation was created that fall and, for the most part, the tessellated, aluminum light canopy, with its 600 individual panels, worked.

    Courtesy The Lowline

    But in the year-and-a-half since, the Lowline’s 15 minutes have come and gone. The project has been eclipsed by other Kickstarter campaigns, including ones for a floating pool, a floating beach, a floating party island, solar paneled streets, and so on and so forth. The Lowline, however, is not dead; the non-profit behind the project has a full-time staff that believes the park could be a reality by 2018. “The past year, and going forward at least another half year, we have been primarily focused on advocacy politically, and refining our technology and design process,” Ramsey recently told AN in his Tribeca office.

    The 2012 installation was an integral piece in getting the Lowline to where it is today; it raised the project’s profile and proved that the technology was actually viable: an underground park could be filled with natural light.


    Courtesy The Lowline

    “We learned a lot about the way the light actually behaves—physically and psychologically,” said Ramsey. “In order to actually have some sort of bearing or reference to how the natural sky works, it was important to strike a balance between directed parallel collimated light and ambient diffuse light.” He explained that he wants the light to create an inviting, timeless quality in the park.

    This technology is still being refined and Ramsey was headed to South Korea to “suss out” an optics manufacturer the day after AN visited his office. But making the Lowline a reality will take more than technology—it will take cash, approximately $50 million.


    Courtesy The Lowline

    Ramsey and Barasch are not planning another Kickstarter. Instead, they are pursuing corporate support, public grants, and said they have received “several seven-figure pledges” for the project. That money, though, is contingent on whether the Lowline gets access to the 1.5-acre site, which is controlled by the MTA.

    Ramsey and Barasch said they are making progress on securing the space, but a spokesperson for the MTA told AN “there is nothing currently happening with regard to this former trolley location.”

    But that could change as the proposed site of the Lowline is directly adjacent to Essex Crossing, a 1.9-million-square-foot development designed by SHoP that is expected to break ground in March. While Ramsey and Barasch said Essex Crossing and the Lowline can exist autonomously, the projects could connect through the mega-development’s “Market Line”—a retail corridor similar to Chelsea Market. Doing so, they say, would significantly boost public space at Essex Crossing.


    Courtesy SHOP

    “The Market Line is going to absorb a lot of the commercial activity and the Lowline will have its own design autonomy," said Vishaan Chakrabarti, a principal at SHoP.

    Since its inception, the Lowline has been racking up political and community support, but ultimately needs City Hall’s blessing to move forward. Ramsey has not landed a meeting with the mayor just yet. “Understandably, the new mayor has been really busy,” he said.

    For the time being, Ramsey and Barasch are pulling together all of the Lowline’s disparate pieces so that if—or when—they get the go-ahead, the project can be executed quickly and efficiently. “This is not like the mayor issues an RFP and it trickles down,” said Ramsey. “This is completely bottom-up urbanism.”


    Courtesy The Lowline


    Courtesy SHOP


    Courtesy The Lowline

    http://www.archpaper.com/news/articl...5#.U9pUfGOc6Gk

  6. #216
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    Sorry. No.

    Imagine being down there on a hot July day. Without a multi-gazillion dollar ventilation system this place stands the chance of being disgusting on many sensory levels.

  7. #217
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    Can't wait to see this in place! Facinating technology to redirect sunlight to a subterranean space like this

  8. #218
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
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    ^ Me, too.


    Albino 'Solar Tower' Planned for Corner of Chrystie and Broome

    by Jeremiah Budin


    Renderings by Leven Betts, via NY YIMBY

    The Bowery will continue its transition to Little Miami with this very white new building coming to 125 Chrystie Street. The nine-story tower is designed by husband-and-wife architecture team Leven Betts, who released a bunch of renderings on their website, reports NY YIMBY. It will be named the Broome Solar Tower due it being "conceived around the mediation between the city grid of the Lower East Side and the solar grid from which the island of Manhattan shifts by 21 degrees." The architects explain further:

    This shift sets up a series of balcony spaces that are angled and varying in depth from the south and east facades of the building. In these spaces that are also shaded by vertically oriented mesh enclosures, the interior spaces and glass are shaded from the sun during the cooling seasons.

    So, it's possible that the whiteness is part of the solar thing, but it also kind of just looks like they forgot to color it in. Leven Betts and developer Trevor Stahelski are aiming or a LEED Silver designation.








    The lower part of the building will contain a theater, rehearsal space, and offices for a dance company, while the upper part will consist of 16 condominium units. Permits have yet to be filed, but the architects' website says that it is "expected to go into construction in 2015."

    Revealed: 125 Chrystie Street, Broome Solar Tower & Theater [NY YIMBY]
    Broome Solar Tower + Theater [Leven Betts]

    http://ny.curbed.com/archives/2014/0...and_broome.php

  9. #219
    Build the Tower Verre antinimby's Avatar
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    Pretty nice architecture but that belongs near the Highline, not in that area.

  10. #220
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    One might think that developers have their eyes on Chrystie Street from Houston all the way down to Canal. Where else in this part of downtown is their frontage onto a wide green space, with protected views?

  11. #221
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    Plus that area is pretty dumpy right now anyway.

  12. #222
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    Developers Submit Preliminary Paperwork For Two More Essex Crossing Buildings

    By Ed Litvak



    More signs of Essex Crossing are popping up in the Department of Buildings database. Next spring, developers are expected to break ground on the first phase of the large residential and commercial project that will transform the former Seward Park urban renewal site.

    During the past week, the development team has put in preliminary paperwork for buildings on two more sites. This means initial plans for three of the first four parcels are beginning to make their way through the city bureaucracy. Here’s what’s reflected in the filings and what we already know from past presentations:

    Site 1: 242 Broome St. (Ludlow Street) Architect: SHoP Height: 14 stories Total square feet: 136.542 Residential square feet: 70,704 (44 market rate condominiums/11 affordable condos) Commercial square feet: 48,718 (including a bowling alley & gym) Community facility square feet: 18,121

    Site 5: 145 Clinton St. (Grand Street) Architect: Beyer Blinder Belle Height: 15 stories
    Total square feet: 222,908 Residential square feet: 179,915 (Rental apartments: 104 market rate, 102 affordable) Commercial square feet: 42,993 (including 35,000 square ft. grocery store)

    Site 6: 175 Delancey St. (Attorney Street) Architect: Dattner Height: 14 stories Total square feet: 138,707 Residential square feet: 73.271 (100 apartments for seniors) Community facility square feet: 59,213 (Grand Street Settlement) Commercial square feet: 6,222

    Still to come — filings for site 2, on the southeast corner of Essex and Delancey streets.

    That’s the focal point of the whole project – a building that will include a new home for the Essex Street Market as well as a new movie theater complex.

    Developers are expected to unveil plans for the first four sites in November or December. Construction is scheduled to begin in March of 2015.

    For more about Essex Crossing, have a look at our recent in-depth interview with Charlie Bendit, co-CEO of Taconic Investment Partners and Isaac Henderson, the project manager. Taconic is building the project with L+M Development Partners and BFC Development Partners. When completed, the project on nine parcels will include 1,000 apartments and 600,000 square feet of commercial space.

    http://www.thelodownny.com/leslog/20...buildings.html

  13. #223
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    Sustainable Earthship Tries To Take Off On the Lower East Side

    by Zoe Rosenberg



    The alien idea of erecting an "earthship" on an empty lot on Pitt Street between Rivington and Delancy streets in the Lower East Side is still very present. Plans for the "radically sustainable home" have reared their head again after three years of dormancy, with updated renderings and an enlivened push at becoming actuality; but with the building's new top-heavy shape, the structure may be bound to the realm of the imagined. Earthship in the Sky is the brainchild of Taos, NM-based architect Michael Reynolds. The structure is a "fully independent home that heats and cools itself without fossil fuel. It also harvests its own electricity and water and contains and treats its own sewage." The building also has a farming area where residents can grow their own food. Originally pitched as a six-story structure, the reimagined building takes a cue from sunflowers—very Taos—and hosts living spaces near its top, closest to the sun.



    The building came in front of Community Board 3 in 2011 "to favorable reviews." Now, Reynolds and co. are pushing forward with its evolved version. The Earthship model has been actualized in other locations, none of which are as transmogrified as what's proposed for the slight Lower East Side lot. Like most space things, whether this idea will take off or fail to launch has yet to be seen.

    Earthship [official]

    http://ny.curbed.com/archives/2014/0..._east_side.php

  14. #224

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    7 ways the Lower East Side is making us swoon

    By Max Gross



    October 15, 2014 | 5:43pm

    Modal Trigger


    The Lower East Side is boasting new developments with big architects attached like Eran Chen who is designing 100 Norfolk St., the new 38-unit condo to be finished late next year. Photo: Moso Studio


    THE Lower East Side hasn’t been low for a very long time.
    Anybody who follows NYC real estate knows that the area has changed quite a bit since the days when your penniless bubbe and zayde disembarked from Russia — but the latest round of changes will shock even the grandkids who reside there thanks to healthy trust funds.

    Just two years ago, the median price of an apartment on the Lower East Side and East Village was $650,000, according to stats from Miller Samuel. Today, it’s $908,242. We suspect it will only get higher.
    Here are seven things to know about this booming neighborhood right now.
    ➊ Two words: Ian Schrager

    Modal TriggerIan Schrager (inset) is putting up hotel and condo 215 Chrystie St., where units are asking $4,000 per square foot.Photo: Ian Schrager Company; Mike Coppola/Getty Images


    Yes, there was a time when the name Ian Schrager was associated with Steve Rubell, Studio 54 and Bianca Jagger. But in the last decade, Schrager instead became synonymous with Bond Street, Gramercy Park and ultra-luxury.

    Schrager has no intention of disappointing with his new baby, 215 Chrystie St., a 370-room hotel and 11-unit condo that has been priced at an eye-popping $4,000 per square foot. (The penthouse is on the market for $18.5 million.) This makes the $16 bagel and lox that you can get at the new Russ & Daughters Cafe, which opened earlier this year a couple of blocks away, almost look reasonable.

    So far, according to Dennis Mangone of Douglas Elliman, who is representing the project, they’ve already sold a three-bedroom unit for $7.75 million and a two-bedroom for $7.15 million. And according to Schrager, both buyers currently own apartments at 40 Bond St. and they are selling “to trade up and live at Chrystie Street.”
    ➋ Say ‘starchitecture’

    The Swiss firm Herzog & de Meuron is designing 215 Chrystie St. — but they’re not the only celebrity architects riding into this low-rise neighborhood. Eran Chen of ODA is designing a condo at 100 Norfolk St. The 12-story building juts out in a series of cantilevers giving it a cubist look; its expected completion date is the end of 2015.

    The building may look ultra-modern for the neighborhood, but Chen tells NYP Home that while “contextualism is very important, progression of a neighborhood is [equally] important.” Chen eliminated apartments on the ground floor and created, instead, a massive three-story lobby.
    “This kind of under-culture avant-garde [remains in] only a few places in the city,” says Chen. “In that sense, our building — being modern and different — plays to this character.”

    And there’s the biggest project to hit the LES: Essex Crossing, a colossus consisting of 1,000 apartments (half of them affordable; 124 will be market-rate condo and 376 will be market-rate rental), and another 600,000 square feet of retail and commercial space, which should be finished over the next seven to 10 years. Big-name architects are attached: SHoP, Beyer Blinder Belle, Hugh A. Boyd, Dattner and Handel Architects worked on the project.
    ➌ Lots and lots of retail and commercial

    Essex Crossing is one of the biggest things to happen to the LES in its history.
    “We’ve been watching those lots for decades,” says Don Capoccia, managing principal of BFC Partners. Along with Taconic and L + M Partners, the company is developing the nearly 2-million-square-foot Essex Crossing on the site of the former Seward Park and a few lots adjacent to the Williamsburg Bridge.

    “We finally got the opportunity to build a connection between Grand Street, the East Village and SoHo, and connect it in a much more substantive way to East Williamsburg.”

    The project also means the Essex Street Market will have a new home. “This is an opportunity to create a new facility for Essex Street Market and expand it for new culinary venues,” says Capoccia. The forthcoming Essex Street Market will be double its current size.
    ➍ More housing

    Condos have also landed in a big way. “We love what’s happening” to the Lower East Side, says Omri Sachs, principal of Adam America Real Estate, which is building 100 Norfolk St. The 38 apartments at 100 Norfolk start at $800,000 and go to over $4 million for a penthouse. “A lot of neighborhood people are buying,” says Ariel Tirosh of Douglas Elliman, who is selling the building. “They’re moving from not-so-old buildings and are upgrading. And you’re seeing a lot of newcomers from the Upper East and Upper West Sides, couples with kids. And investors are much more aggressive, and much more confident.”

    In addition to 100 Norfolk, Tirosh is also marketing 179 Ludlow, a six-unit condo consisting of floor-through apartments, where units start at $1.65 million. Tirosh adds that he’s “working on at least three or four [other] condos — but that’s down the road.”

    Foodies citywide shed a few tears when they found out one of the neighborhood’s most respected eateries, wd-50, at 50 Clinton St., was closing next month. What’s taking its place, however, is another round of condos being put up by DHA Capital that should be priced starting at around $1 million for one-bedrooms — a price not easy to find in Manhattan new construction.

    Modal TriggerThe School House.Photo: Adam Grimshaw

    ➎ Some of the housing is here already!

    Modal TriggerAaron Brents and his girlfriend Katelyn Hernandez just moved into The School House.Photo: Christian Johnston


    “I came out from California, so I’m not one to live in a shoebox,” says Aaron Brents, who just moved into The School House, a 117-unit rental at 371 Madison St., which launched late last month.
    “It’s 1,000 square feet with windows out front and out back,” says Brents.

    And even though The School House is a bit removed from prime blocks like Ludlow and Rivington, it’s not without its comforts. “It’s kind of in a funky location,” says Jodi Cowen of Modern Spaces, who is marketing The School House with Andres Pellot-Ramos.

    Rents go from $2,700 to $4,300, and the building boasts a pool, gym, full-time doorman, residents lounge and two outdoor spaces.
    “Where are you going to be getting prices like that five or six blocks from the F train?” asks Cowen.
    ➏ Hotels are rising, too

    Modal TriggerOne of the new guys is 179 Ludlow St., a six-unit condo where prices start at $1.65 million.Photo: Kleinman Architects


    In addition to Schrager’s project, there’s much hotel news to buzz about. For instance, The Ludlow, a 184-room hotel (where rates start at $295 per night) just opened up last month.
    But if 184 rooms sound just too darn small, the Hotel Indigo LES is opening a block away in the first half of next year.
    It will be 24 stories and consist of 300 rooms — not to mention a 13th-floor outdoor venue with pool and bar.
    ➐ The food is only getting better

    Yes, we were all sad to hear that wd-50 is closing to make way for new condos — but it’s not like anybody cruising Clinton Street will go hungry: Just in the last few months, Ivan Ramen and Seoul Chicken have opened down the block. And while your bubbe and zayde might think that the food is nothing like it was when they were living on the Lower East Side, they’d be wrong.

    There’s the new Russ & Daughters Cafe, for example. (It’s pricey, but authentic.)
    And while classics like Katz’s Deli might have sold the air rights on their building to developers (yes, it really has!) Katz’s isn’t going anywhere. Bubbe and zayde will sleep well when they come to visit you in one of these luxury hotels.

    http://nypost.com/2014/10/15/7-ways-...king-us-swoon/

  15. #225
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    Lower East Siders Want More Say in Essex Crossing's New Park

    by Shannon Ayala



    The park planned for the Lower East Side's residential-commercial-retail-cultural-etc. megaproject Essex Crossing, which will run along Broome Street between Clinton and Suffolk, has evolved after designers spent months collecting feedback from the community. "We were hearing that, 'We want the place to be quiet, we want it to be relaxed, and we want nature,'" said landscape architect Claire Agre of West 8 at a community meeting last week.

    Still, after community sessions and postcard campaigns for input, neighbors' concerns still cropped up. One woman worried the park would lack green space that people could actually sit on, like in Union Square. Agre responded, "It would be wonderful to have the whole thing green, but given the maintenance... and also having lawn in the shade is usually something that doesn't hold up very well." The designers did alter the sections of green space, breaking up the central path with an island, and dotted the perimeter with trees. But the most prevalent neighbor beef seemed to have less to do with design.


    At left, old rendering; at right, the new one.

    Though Agre acknowledged she had heard, loud and clear, that the community wants to deliver continued input regarding this technically private park, Community Board 3 wants something more binding. To that end, the parks committee passed a resolution advocating for a system to include neighbors in decision-making during the life of the park. "My main concern," said board member Ayo Arrington, "is at what point are we going to get this commitment in writing?"



    The 15,000-square-foot space will include a kids' playground as well as moveable tables and chairs. Construction is set to begin in March 2015 and wrap up in 2017.



    http://ny.curbed.com/archives/2014/1...s_new_park.php

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