Page 8 of 17 FirstFirst ... 456789101112 ... LastLast
Results 106 to 120 of 244

Thread: Lower East Side Development

  1. #106

    Default

    School of Visual Arts dormitory.


    darwinism

  2. #107
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    7,476

    Default

    Fischer Dumps New Luxury Rentals on the LES Market

    January 19, 2010, by Joey



    Save for the pioneering luxury condo building 154 Attorney Street and the odd case known as River Ridge, the still-gritty portion of the Lower East Side east of Clinton Street has remained largely free from gentrification's golden touch. But just because the late-night revelry of the LES doesn't quite extend this close to the East River doesn't mean developers aren't eying the 'hood. The summer of 2008 brought word of a new eight-story, 53-unit apartment building at Stanton and Ridge Streets from the one, the only, architect Karl Fischer. Time went by, and the rubble-strewn lot did indeed birth a fresh pile of Hot Karl. That building now has an identity, The Stanton, and a website that makes you feel like you're piloting a spaceship—the jazziest spaceship in the universe! We phoned the building's broker to get the deets.

    The Stanton will open to residents on March 1, and it's a rental through and through. The pricing-per-month breakdown is as follows: studios start at $1,950, 1BRs at $2,450 and 2BRs (with 2BAs) at $3,500. The floorplans for floors 4-8 are on the website, and they show that every unit has at least one balcony, while some have two and others have large private terraces. Other amenities: roof deck, home theater/game room, gym, bike storage area, a pet grooming room and other foreign concepts to Ridge Street. A leasing office will open on-site in a "few days," and the building has retail space. Maybe a high-end boutique owner looking for an edgy image will roll the dice on the outskirts of Hell Square?

    The Stanton [thestantonny.com]
    Here Komes Karl: Lower East Side Goes Searching for Fischer [Curbed]

    http://curbed.com/archives/2010/01/1...arket.php#more

  3. #108
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    7,476

    Default

    Luxury Housing on Avenue D - More Debate, and a Decision



    Our story last month about a luxury development planned on East Houston Street touched off an interesting debate among some of our readers about affordable housing. That debate continued during Community Board 3’s full board meeting last week. As you may recall, CB3’s land use committee had voted 9-4 to approve the sale of a city-owned parcel to a private developer. The developer, whose name was not disclosed, intends to build on the corner of Houston and Avenue D. There would be 166 rental apartments, 34 of them affordable. This past Tuesday evening, CB3 accepted the committee’s recommendation to approve the deal, with 18 voting yes and 11 voting no.

    The opposition to the “Houston Dee” proposal was led by CB3 member Barden Prisant, who argued the city should build an all-affordable development on the parcel, rather than selling it to the private developer. He theorized that the developer would go ahead with the project, even without the city parcel. They’d by obligated to set aside 20-percent of the building as affordable regardless. The city would then be able to create 33 affordable units on its own property. Proceeding in this fashion, he suggested, would produce 25 units of additional affordable housing for the community:
    Back in 2005 we voted to support this on the assumption that they would give back to the community something in the way of open space, because they basically demolished a community garden in order to sell ths land to the developer. At the committee meeting this month, we had a split vote on this, far from unanimous. There were definitely concerns… The city has demolished a community garden, given nothing back, they’re getting millions of dollars for it, none of which the city says it can direct towards our neighborhood… To me it’s a lousy deal.
    But another board member, David Crane, said he believed Prisant was mistaken about the garden:
    …There is not a community garden there. The city is under a court order not to have a net loss in community gardens. They swapped out different lots, same size. That garden has been (dormant) for 10 years… It was a vacant lot for quite a long time and then finally the city established a second garden a few blocks away… This garden has not been there for a long time. I do not think that is an issue.”
    Land Use Committee Chair David McWater said the developer cannot be blamed for the lack of open space in the design plans. Referring to the rezoning of the Lower East Side two years ago, he explained, “we changed the zoning on them. It’s now a mandatory street wall. They can’t put open space there.” But more to the point, McWater asserted, some members had lost sight of what they were actually being asked to consider:
    The fact is the city is selling this lot. That’s the question we’re being asked – whether or not we approve of the sale to this developer… This is the best case developer because they’ve got all of the lots, privately held, adjacent to it. So for them the real estate has much more value than for someone who just wanted to build a tiny sliver building… They can build market rate housing whether we approve this or not… The question is not whether we want market rate housing on Avenue D. The question is do we want to dispose of this land in this way… We pushed really hard in the zoning to get Houston Street and some of these other streets to have 20-percent affordable housing… If we want to build affordable housing let’s build affordable housing.
    During the discussion, some members said CB3 was obliged to consider the ramifications of allowing a luxury building (studios are projected to cost $2800/month) to be built right across the street from, perhaps, the densest concentration of public housing in the entire city. CB3’s Harvey Epstein observed that the development seems geared towards a transient population, rather than people who want to establish deep roots in the community:
    It’s really stark how many studios are in this building. If the city really wanted these to be affordable units for people who are going to stay in this community, they wouldn’t have such an overwhelming number of studios. So our 20-percent includes so few one and two bedroom apartments. Studios are transition housing. A studio isn’t something someone’s going to live in for 40 years. That’s my biggest problem with this, and that’s where the city should have really pushed this developer… I think the city failed us on this proposal.
    A few board members said Prisant’s suggestion that 100-percent affordable housing could be built on the parcel, was unrealistic given the economic realities in 2010. Concerns were expressed that the lot could sit vacant for years to come. Val Orselli, an affordable housing advocate, said of the current Houston Dee proposal, “it’s a pretty good deal given what’s going on in this community.” Prisant responded, “HPD (the NYC Department of Housing Preservation & Development) builds affordable housing. They may not be able to do it this year. The economy will come back around. The city will have money.” He added, “I find it shocking that we should take this defeatist attitude and play down what we can achieve as a community board by sending a strong vote – that we should let it color our vote, this belief that we do not have a say in how this is being disposed of is disheartening.”
    The community board was asked to weigh in on the sale of the city-owned lot, as part of the Uniform Land Use Review Procedure (ULURP). In stipulations drafted by the land use committee, the developer reluctantly agreed to close its roof deck after 10 o’clock every evening. The affordable units will range in price from $460-$770/per month.

    http://www.thelodownny.com/leslog/20...html#more-3857

  4. #109
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    7,476

    Default

    Orchard Street Hell Building Fans the Flames Anew

    February 3, 2010, by Joey


    For five years the massive stalled block-through development on Orchard Street just south of Houston Street has been the Lower East Side's biggest eyesore, but that all changed last summer when the rotting concrete hulk added ... a colorful new mural! We figured that would be the only progress on the Orchard Street Hell Building for the next five years, but maybe that's not the case. The Lo-Down chatted with LES broker/kingpin Sion Misrahi, who's in charge of leasing the ill-fated hotel tower's retail space, and he says developer Morris Platt now wants the building to be 100-percent residential. And he would've gotten away with it, too, if it wasn't for that meddling DOB!

    The Lo-Down writes:
    According to Misrahi, a DOB commissioner signed off on the proposal recently — but then “someone else at the Buildings Department” said it was a no-go. Misrahi said Platt isn’t about to proceed with “a $60 million project” until the situation is sorted out. “What if he finishes the building and then the DOB comes in and says you’ve got to tear off the top two floors,” Misrahi asked.
    Oh, what sweet justice that would bring to long-suffering Lower East Siders tired of the Orchard Street construction war zone. Misrahi also claims there's interest in the retail space from clothing stores and a bakery, so maybe if Platt can't get the green light from the DOB he'll carry through on those strip mall threats.

    Misrahi: New Plan For 180 Orchard Tangled in DOB Red Tape [The Lo-Down]
    Orchard Street Hell Building coverage [Curbed]

    http://curbed.com/archives/2010/02/0...lames_anew.php

  5. #110
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    7,476

    Default

    Co-op President Discusses Views on SPURA Redevelopment



    Michael Tumminia, president of the Seward Park Co-op, says 43 years is long enough to wait for redevelopment of the Seward Park Urban Renewal Area (SPURA). In a recent interview with The Lo-Down, he acknowledged, “the Grand Street co-ops have been perceived as one of the key forces preventing development.” But Tumminia, head of Grand Street’s largest residential complex added, the Seward Park Co-op “doesn’t want to be one of the forces stopping development. We want to help get something done.”

    In the four decades since 2-thousand homes (along with many businesses) were demolished, the city-owned SPURA parcels have been the subject of many legendary battles. In recent years, Grand Street residents have advocated for the development of market rate apartments or commercial enterprises – while opposing demands from affordable housing groups to build low-income and middle income units. Along the way, they’ve had a powerful ally by their side, State Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver (a Grand Street resident himself).

    But Tumminia believes the time might just be right to make a deal. “I think as long as it’s done in a way that’s fair to everyone in the community, there should be both market rate and affordable housing built on those lots, in addition to commercial uses” he said. Tumminia hopes the majority of the apartments will be market rate, but significantly, he is willing to entertain the idea that at least some units would be subsidized. He agrees with the conventional wisdom that the market will determine what’s possible. Even most affordable housing advocates concede that no-large scale project would be feasible without the involvement of a market-rate developer.

    As part of a strategy to engage on the issue, Pietro Filardo of the Seward Park Board of Directors, recently became a public member of Community Board 3’s SPURA task force. Tumminia told me the board does not have an official position on what should be built, but he believes their involvement in the process can help bridge the divides in the neighborhood. “We all know compromise is only possible if everyone is at the negotiating table and everyone accepts that they’re not going to get everything they want,” he said. “We want to see some investment in our community.”



    Tumminia suggested developing the SPURA parcels could be a boon to the neighborhood. He favors “mixed-use” development, incorporating residential units, open space, retail stores and cultural facilities. “At the end of the day,” he said, “what we’re talking about is employment opportunities, more people coming down here, adding to the tax base, investing in our community.” But he also said the Co-op would be pushing to make sure the infrastructure is in place to support a large influx of new residents and businesses. Among their top concerns: adequate transportation, police protection, schools and parking.

    The Seward Park Co-op – located just to the south of the SPURA parcels – consists of more than 1700 apartments. The complex was built by labor unions in 1957 as a middle-income cooperative. Prices were capped at a few thousand dollars per room – any shareholder opting out was required to sell his apartment back to the co-op for – more or less – the original price.

    Like its Grand Street neighbors, Seward Park voted in the late 90’s to become a free market development. Tumminia said Seward Park shareholders have a right to protect their investment by ensuring that future development doesn’t damage the equity they have built up in their homes. He’s convinced a balanced, multi-use facility (with a mixture of housing types) would make the neighborhood more appealing and dynamic.

    There are a good number of Grand Street residents who contend there’s already enough affordable housing on the Lower East Side. They cite statistics showing the neighborhood has the second highest number of subsidized/low income apartments in the city. But Tumminia told me the key is how Community Board 3 ends up defining the term, affordable housing. “Are we talking about affordable housing that teachers and police officers and city employees can afford?,” he asked.

    The CB3 committee will not discuss how to define “affordability” until the spring or summer. Some Grand Street residents have expressed alarm at the prospect of more public housing in the neighborhood. But the truth is, no one on the committee has advocated new NYCHA developments on the SPURA parcels. The more likely scenario: a specified number of low income and middle income apartments, subsidized by a private developer (possibly augmented by government programs). In general terms, housing is considered affordable if it consumes no more than 30% of a family’s income. In New York City that translates into about $925/month for a low income household (those earning less than 80 percent of the city’s median income, $36,500).

    On various issues during the past few months, Tumminia has reached out to his counterparts in the other cooperatives on Grand Street; East River, Hillman and Amalgamated. The developments have (to put it mildly) not always enjoyed the warmest relations. But the lines of communication are now open. The developments collaborated, for example, in the recent campaign to save the Pitt Station Post Office (located in the Seward Park Co-op). Now these new relationships will now be tested. It remains to be seen how Tumminia’s point of view will be received in the buildings to the east of Seward Park.

    For the moment, elected officials and city planners are giving the community board room to work, in hopes a consensus plan will emerge. Tumminia said he hopes, when the time is right, the neighborhood’s elected representatives will play a more active role. Silver has said he’d support a community-based plan if it has broad support. District 1’s new City Councilmember, Margaret Chin, has made affordable housing on the SPURA parcels a high priority.

    Tumminia is optimistic that Seward Park’s involvement now will make a positive difference down the road and that the community will eventually coalesce around a plan everyone can embrace. “I think there could be a meeting of the minds as far as what makes sense. I think Seward Park believes that being in the middle of the conversation will help get something done,” he said.

    http://www.thelodownny.com/leslog/20...a-parcels.html

  6. #111
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    7,476

    Default

    Clergy Fights Preservationists Over Historic Designation of Russian Orthodox Cathedral

    By Nicole Breskin



    EAST VILLAGE — Preservationists are calling on neighbors to fight for landmark status for a 120-year-old Russian Orthodox Cathedral even though some clergy protest that the historical designation could signal the end of the church.

    Andrew Berman, of the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation, and officials from the East Village Community Coalition are encouraging locals to turn out to support the preservation of the Russian Orthodox Cathedral at a hearing on Tuesday. There, the Landmarks Preservation Commission will receive feedback on whether the 59 E. 2nd St. building should be considered for preservation based on its historic status.

    “The more than a century-old Russian Orthodox Cathedral is not only a great work of architecture, but it speaks to the great history of the East Village as a place of successive waves of immigrants who transformed this city," Berman told DNAinfo.

    But not everyone wants the iconic gothic structure — which was the setting for an orphanage where Angelina Jolie filmed “Salt” — to be landmarked. The Russian Orthodox Cathedral’s clergy are concerned that the landmark designation could add a financial burden that would push the church under.

    “Please don’t levy additional burdens of landmarking on a struggling worship community by pushing forward with this new interference,” clergy wrote in a note, which they are encouraging members of the church to sign and send to the commission's chairman Robert Tierney.

    “This could lead to the cathedral being forced to eventually cut the pay or benefits of its already meagerly paid staff," the clergy said.

    "Even worse, it could eventually lead to … the building to slowly decay, and possibly be sold and converted from a community space church to condos or coops.”

    There are no dues or fees associated with landmarking and owners are not required to make changes to their buildings, but any new construction or repairs to the cathedral’s façade are under the purview of the commission. Some have argued that repairing buildings in line within preservationist guidelines can be more expensive.

    On the Upper West Side, the congregation of the West Park Presbyterian Church is fighting to have a landmark designation overturned because the worshipers claim they can't afford the upkeep of the church.

    But Berman said the cost factor was more of a “misconception” with hundreds of landmarked religious sites in the city.

    The Russian Orthodox Cathedral was first converted to a chapel in 1867 by the New York Mission Society, catering to immigrants with services in German, Hungarian, Italian and Russian. It was designed by renowned architect Josiah Cleveland Cady, who would later think up plans for the original Metropolitan Opera House.

    The property was purchased by the Orthodox Church of America in 1943. It now has a religious school, a library on Orthodox Christian texts and regular liturgical services.

    But it has struggled with financial hardship and was almost turned into an 8-story condo.

  7. #112

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Merry View Post
    Haven't we seen this building before? Somewhere around West 72nd Street?

  8. #113
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    7,476

    Default

    Very nice.


    Lower East Side Mystery 38 Delancey Hits Market

    May 17, 2010, by Sara




    (click to enlarge)

    Location: 38 Delancey Street
    Size: 55 units
    Prices: $615,000 to $1.355 million in listings online so far
    Architect: Harry Hong
    Developer: We don't know!
    Sales & Marketing: Corcoran and Elliman

    Lowdown: We weren't quite ready to crown it as a Development Du Jour just for some signage and a website, but the listings for 38 Delancey Street are now online, earning it the full treatment. We already knew that the entry point for condos was $615,000, and, at least for the first crop of listings, the upper price limit is $1.355 million for a 1,104-square-foot 2BR. The building also brings to the luxury-housing-deprived LES (or what the brokerbabble calls "the intersection of Nolita, Chinatown, the East Village and the Lower East Side") a roof deck, on-site parking, cold storage, and a 421a tax abatement. We've seen the interior images before, but the floorplans are new. How do they look?

    Official website: 38 Delancey [38delanceystreet.com]
    38 Delancey Street in Lower East Side [StreetEasy]
    38 Delancey coverage [Curbed]

    http://ny.curbed.com/archives/2010/0...its_market.php

  9. #114
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    7,476

    Default

    SPURA Madness Makes Annual Lower East Side Appearance

    June 25, 2010, by Joey

    Every summer we like to check in on the Seward Park Urban Renewal Area (SPURA), the network of parking lots south of Delancey Street near the Williamsburg Bridge that happens to be the largest parcel of undeveloped city-owned land south of 96th Street. For 40 years plans to build housing on SPURA have been bogged down by neighborhood debate over who gets to live there, though flashy plans and renderings have occasionally surfaced. Hardcore SPURAites will remember that the topic made a rare off-season cameo in November, when the committee chairman tasked with formulating a final SPURA plan threatened to pull the plug on the whole thing. Did they pull it together?

    Based on this Villager update that doesn't really need to go beyond one sentence, it would appear not:
    Members of Community Board 3’s Housing and Land Use Committee were told in no uncertain terms at a Mon., June 21, meeting that they needed to get their act together if anything was ever going to be done by the city to develop five parcels of land south of Delancey St. at the foot of the Williamsburg Bridge that have remained vacant for more than 40 years.
    Whew, what a year! See you next summer, SPURA!

    What’s in cards for Seward site? C.B. 3 is game [The Villager]
    SPURA coverage [Curbed]

    http://ny.curbed.com/archives/2010/0...rance.php#more

  10. #115

  11. #116
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    7,476

    Default

    Developer Wants to Downsize Stalled LES Building

    July 14, 2010, by Joey



    The CurbedWire alarm was sounded way back in April 2007 regarding construction going on across the street from the Lower East Side's Seward Park. Back then a tipster wrote: "Does anyone know anything about the 13 story junky condo building being built at 183 East Broadway? This future piece of junk will tower over the historic Forward Building's 10 stories, a few doors away. They are continuing to violate a stop work order that was issued because their demolition and structural work caused huge cracks and shaking in the adjacent buildings." Those were the days, right LES? Well, it looks like that stop work order was eventually obeyed, because The Lo-Down now reports the developer appeared before the community board to present new plans for a seven-story building and ask for forgiveness. Here are some details:
    Seeking a variance from the Board of Standards and Appeals, Wai Sun presented CB3 with revised plans, including the addition of limestone on the facade, iron balconies and the elimination of two parking spaces. They argued it would be wrong to penalize a developer for proceeding with a project the Buildings Department had initially approved. If the project (now planned as a 7 story building) does not go forward soon the owner said it’s possible he would default on a $5 million loan. He also presented a letter, detailing efforts made to attract a tenant for the proposed community facility in the building.
    Despite all this, "the committee was unswayed," though a vote was put off. The stalled concrete shell is visible in the Google Street View image seen up top, and here's a shot of the Henry Street side of the problem child. Should the locals let bygones be bygones?



    CB3 Signals Support for Two New Residential Projects; East Broadway Developer Turned Away Again [The Lo-Down]
    CurbedWire: 183 E. Broadway Grows Up [CurbedWire]

    http://ny.curbed.com/archives/2010/0...lding.php#more

  12. #117

    Default

    That setback is pretty offensive.

  13. #118
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    NYC - Downtown
    Posts
    32,654

    Default

    Make the law-breaking landlord tear it down and restore the street wall. No doubt the proposed addition of balconies and limestone will be in the mode of other Chinatown specials, all looking like the bastard children from the Gene Kaufman school of architecture.

  14. #119

    Default

    ^^ *Sigh* It's true. ^^

  15. #120

Page 8 of 17 FirstFirst ... 456789101112 ... LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Greenways and Waterfront Development
    By Edward in forum New York City Guide For New Yorkers
    Replies: 198
    Last Post: July 21st, 2015, 01:30 AM
  2. Fading Into History: The Jewish Lower East Side
    By Kris in forum New York City Guide For New Yorkers
    Replies: 16
    Last Post: September 8th, 2014, 09:44 PM
  3. Transit Plan for Lower Manhattan
    By amigo32 in forum New York City Guide For New Yorkers
    Replies: 51
    Last Post: March 21st, 2008, 01:24 PM
  4. A Stroll in Lower Manhattan
    By ddny in forum New York City Guide For Visitors
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: January 23rd, 2003, 10:40 AM
  5. Manhattan Leads a Surge in Lower-Cost Hotels
    By Edward in forum New York City Guide For Visitors
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: October 8th, 2002, 01:00 AM

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  


Google+ - Facebook - Twitter - Meetup

Edward's photos on Flickr - Wired New York on Flickr - In Queens - In Red Hook - Bryant Park - SQL Backup Software