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Thread: 40 Mercer - Located at Broadway in SOHO - Condo - by Jean Nouvel

  1. #121

    Default saw it yesterday

    a very cool building, very appropriae for Soho. It's dark, but not as dark as the photos have suggested. I think because its so dark, it's difficult for automatic cameras to get a correct exposure. I would have liked it to be a shade lighter, but this is a rgeat building. Question is, do you really want to drop mega millions to live in such a busy nasty retail street like Broadway?

    Also checked out 40 Bond. I think 40 mercer will be better.

  2. #122
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    Another question: Do you want a swimming pool / deck overlooking Broadway (such is is offered with the unit at the setback above the 5th Floor -- a seemingly quieter pool area is also offered at the other end of the building along Mercer Street)?

  3. #123

    Default evern Mercer is super busy

    Quote Originally Posted by lofter1 View Post
    Another question: Do you want a swimming pool / deck overlooking Broadway (such is is offered with the unit at the setback above the 5th Floor -- a seemingly quieter pool area is also offered at the other end of the building along Mercer Street)?

    but no way would I buy if I could along Bway.

  4. #124
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    Another bank branch gets ready to open ...




  5. #125

    Default New photos on Flickr

    Found this set earlier today. What Columbia Business School has to do with a construction site, however, I can't say.

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/spae/se...ith/427981796/

  6. #126
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    What seems to be the very first tenants were moving in over the weekend -- or at least their movers were loading their possessions into the building.

  7. #127

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    April 2, 2007
    Seductive Machines for City Living
    By NICOLAI OUROUSSOFF


    Jean Nouvel’s residential building in SoHo updates the cast-iron structures of that neighborhood.

    In today’s Manhattan, there are few better ways to assume the mantle of sophistication than shelling out millions to live in a building designed by a famous architect. The result is a surfeit of architects pumping out emblems of conspicuous consumption.

    But on occasion the result is also exquisite architecture.

    Two new residential buildings designed by the French architect Jean Nouvel even raise the possibility that hedonistic materialism is good for the soul. Both buildings — one nearing completion in SoHo, the other just getting under way in Chelsea — are being marketed as collectibles for the ultra-rich, but they are more than baubles.

    Their dreamy lobbies and sleek apartments conjure the kind of voyeuristic fantasy that, as Hitchcock understood, makes city life so tantalizing. At the same time they take their cues from the rough edges — empty lots, blank brick walls, rooftop graffiti — that express New York’s essential gritty identity.

    Of the two the SoHo building is the more restrained. Its muscular steel frame rises on Grand Street between Broadway and Mercer, formerly a light-manufacturing area, later an art mecca and now a trendy shopping district overrun with tourists. The neighborhood’s once-derelict cast iron-frame buildings are now prized real estate.

    Mr. Nouvel doesn’t reject this history; he tips his hat to it, showing us what can be accomplished through ingenious planning and calculated consideration of the setting. The building’s heavy steel frame, for instance, can be read as an updated version of those cast-iron structures that give SoHo its industrial character. The height of its five-story base loosely follows the cornice line of the masonry buildings along Broadway, and the upper floors are set back from the street to make room for large terraces, at eye level with the nearby rooftops.

    Architects will doubtless notice how the steel I-beams framing the exterior play on the formal elegance of Mies van der Rohe’s Seagram Building uptown, perhaps the city’s greatest Modernist landmark. They also bring to mind the glass-and-steel grids of Richard Meier’s recent residential towers on the West Side Highway at Perry Street and Charles Street.

    Mr. Meier’s finely detailed creations suggest the cool precision of a Swiss watch, but Mr. Nouvel is after something more slyly playful. Mr. Meier likes his steel white; Mr. Nouvel, battleship gray. The I-beams in Mr. Nouvel’s SoHo building are set flush with the glass, giving it a taut profile. The rear, overlooking a narrow empty lot that will be transformed into a private garden, is treated as a raw concrete wall punctured by unadorned windows: the kind of blank side wall we associate with humdrum tenements.

    There are other signs that this building is not ready to conform. In a rather strained note, an odd trellis-like structure decorated with blue glass louvers wraps over the building’s top corner, a kind of contemporary cupola meant to contrast with the dome of the 1909 Police Building a few blocks away. Horizontal bands of dark blue and red glass interrupt the purity of the street facades. On warm days big mechanized glass panels set into the facade — essentially moving walls — will slide open, transforming the apartments into covered terraces and giving the building the appearance of an elaborate machine.

    Mr. Nouvel has played this trick before — most notably in his Nemausus housing project in Nîmes, France — to allow the messiness of the apartments to spill into view, breaking down the distance between the building’s inner life and the life of the street. (Picture, if you will, how much livelier the SoHo building would be with satellite antennas and clotheslines strung between the windows.)

    It’s only when you step inside that you experience the building’s underlying hedonism. The lobby, not yet finished, is conceived as a vertical slot, extremely high and narrow, framed by windows overlooking a leafy tree-filled garden on one side; on the other, panels of reflective glass are superimposed with black-and-white images of a forest.

    As you proceed through the lobby, the images will dissolve into spectral scenes, a haunting fairy tale landscape of trees, real and fake, and shadowy figures. A slot of glass laid into the lobby floor allows you to peek down at an underground pool in which residents will be visible bathing surrounded by white marble.

    Real estate agents, no doubt, have promised glimpses of a dripping wet Uma Thurman (who has been dating André Balazs, the building’s developer), although you’re more likely to spot an overweight bond trader. But who cares? The point is titillation. And once you enter the apartments, the views are truly stupendous: elaborate cornices, wrought iron facades, wood water towers and rooftop graffiti.

    http://www.nytimes.com/2007/04/02/ar...gn/02nouv.html

  8. #128

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    Is there a thread for the other nouvel building?

  9. #129
    Moderator NYatKNIGHT's Avatar
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    It's been discussed in Highline Area Development.

  10. #130

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    I like

  11. #131
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    The Next Dakota

    French starchitect Jean Nouvel’s 40 Mercer reimagines the quintessential
    New York apartment house downtown, with river views.


    By David Colman


    Left, Jean Nouvel in one of 40 Mercer's apartments, many of which have either red or blue glass
    accent windows. Right, looking up at the mammoth blue-glass-louvered brise-soleil at the top of
    the building's Broadway façade, a reimagined cornice that refers to the neighboring nineteenth-
    century rooflines.


    Breaking ground is all well and good, but it can also be argued that the best architects are those who give into that most human urge: to reproduce.

    That thought is crystallized in famed French architect Jean Nouvel’s gleaming new Soho apartment house, 40 Mercer, a vision in red, blue, steel, and wood. Quieter, cleverer, and more lavish than Richard Meier’s Perry Street towers, 40 Mercer pays homage not only to its neighboring nineteenth-century cast-iron buildings (and their fifteenth-century Florentine forebears) but to a host of twentieth-century greats: Mondrian, Barragan, Mies van der Rohe. And yet it is utterly seductive as a unique and intriguing work of architecture.

    There are a thousand little points of reference. The bracketed cornice on the east façade and the boxy, planar Palladian windows on the rear are a reference to nearby Broadway façades. Inside, the wood-and-stainless-steel kitchens nod to Eames, and the sleek, multiple-veneered and back-painted glass-tile bathrooms recall Parisian Art Deco luxury. Those touches might be lost on some, although not on Todd Eberle, one of today’s best-known architectural photographers and a contributor at Vanity Fair. For him, 40 Mercer was love at first sight. He and longtime boyfriend Richard Pandiscio were among the first people to move into the building late last month; these photos document the move.

    “I love how Nouvel references the history of Soho and how seriously he took the responsibility of putting a building in that historic area,” said Eberle, who is more used to photographing starchitect buildings that spring up like magic mushrooms, irrespective of place. “This isn’t an arrogant, arriviste building,” he said. “There’s a soul in this building, and that comes from Nouvel’s dialogue with the history around it.”

    Of course, one might expect Eberle to be charitably inclined to 40 Mercer, given that Pandiscio—the marketing mind behind the Neue Galerie, Cipriani Wall Street, and the Urban Glass House—has also done 40 Mercer’s branding campaign.

    But even buying one of the building’s smaller apartments— a hardly humble,1,700-square-foot two-bedroom enfilade and the only one whose windows have both red and blue panes of the colored glass that makes the building so Mondrian-esque—was a severe financial stretch, a testament to both men’s affinity for the place. It also makes a supreme location for the couple’s collection of Donald Judd furniture and sculpture.

    Even now, when all the apartments are long sold and Pandiscio could easily stop gushing, he says that his initial sales pitch of world-class luxury totally missed the mark. “It wasn’t until the place was more or less done that I really got in it, and got to see that Nouvel is all about light and reflection and volume and proportion,” he says. “I felt like I had kind of failed.” Hardly.


    Left, a massive Donald Judd library table and chairs (soon to be joined by other pieces) have an
    ideal home in Eberle and Pandiscio's apartment. Right, view of the building.


    Views of the building, inside and out.


    Left, the building's kitchens, finished with a variety of beautiful woods, recall the shelving
    designed by Charles and Ray Eames. Right, the building's references to Mondrian are playful
    but contribute to its overall sense of serenity.


    Copyright © 2007, New York Magazine Holdings LLC.

  12. #132

  13. #133
    The Dude Abides
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    6/26:












  14. #134

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    Could the distortion created by those non-flat panes of glass be intentional? Most of the glass is very flat, but the rest appears to create an interesting abstraction in the reflections. Seems like something Nouvel would do.

    Also, the view out of the red windows onto the streets of SoHo reminds me of some of Warhol's work. That also seems like something Nouvel would do intentionally.

  15. #135

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