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Thread: Greenwich St South Development

  1. #166
    Kings County Loyal BrooklynLove's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Derek2k3 View Post
    Also that ugly HS. for Economics just behind this site will most likely be redeveloped into a tower once their lease expires.
    that will be a joyous time. this building is beyond butt ugly. same goes for the former syms location down at the other end of trinity place.

  2. #167

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    I agree on both counts.

  3. #168

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    Damascus on the Hudson

    Lower Manhattan's Old Syrian Quarter to Be Recalled in Lecture and Exhibit



    Greenwich Street south of the World Trade Center

    Today, the stretch of Greenwich and Washington Streets between Battery Place and Albany Street -- bisected by the Brooklyn-Battery Tunnel entrance -- is known by the forgettable name, "Greenwich South." By all appearances it is an orphan of a neighborhood that never quite coalesced. But nothing could be further from the truth. A century ago, before the World Trade Center or the Brooklyn Battery Tunnel (the two giant public works projects that decimated this once-thriving quarter), it was an ethnic enclave as vibrant as Little Italy or Chinatown.

    But the immigrants who flocked here were Arabs, and the neighborhood was called, "Little Syria." The length of Greenwich Street, north of Battery Park and south of Liberty Street, was for newcomers from Damascus, Beirut, and Jerusalem, what Mulberry Street was for Italian transplants and Canal Street was for the Chinese. Their life was centered beneath the Ninth Avenue Elevated Train, which ran up Greenwich Street. (As difficult as it is to envision this perilously narrow lane accommodating a railroad viaduct, it did -- and the station at Rector Street was the center of their small town.) The social and spiritual focus of the community was St. Joseph's Maronite Church, for most of the Arabic-speaking immigrants who lived here were Christian (of the Maronite and Melkite sects), rather than Muslim.


    On Tuesday, April 30, Linda Jacobs, a scholar who has extensively studied Little Syria, will share a podium with Todd Fine, co-founder of the "Save Washington Street," preservation campaign. Together, they will present "Little Syria: Lower Manhattan Before the World Trade Center," a discussion on the history of the neighborhood, at the 9/11 Tribute Center, 120 Liberty Street, in Lower Manhattan. (The event begins at 6:30 pm and admission is free, but anybody wishing to attend is asked to e-mail rsvp@tributewtc.org. And starting on May 3, and continuing through May 27, the Arab American National Museum (based in Dearborn, Michigan) will present at the 3LD Art & Technology Center (80 Greenwich Street) an exhibition documenting the neighborhood's history.

    The saga that both presentations will recall is a somber one. In the 1940s, construction of the Brooklyn-Battery Tunnel erased many square blocks of the neighborhood. (During this period, the construction of the West Side Elevated Highway also cut off Little Syria from the surrounding area.) St. Joseph's Church, which stood where the Battery Parking Garage is now located, was demolished. (Its cornerstone was found in excavation of debris from the World Trade Center site in 2002.) In the 1950s, the Ninth Avenue El was taken out of service and its tracks torn down, further isolating the neighborhood. As New York's status as a port declined and nearby docks were abandoned, the constant stream of imports that was the economic lifeblood for the community withered. (In the 1970s, those piers would finally be demolished to make way for the landfill that became Battery Park City.) But Little Syria's death knell was the construction of the World Trade Center, beginning in the late 1960s, which seized several more blocks of the community, and effectively sealed its northern border. The small remnant of the 100,000-plus Arab population that had once lived there decamped for Brooklyn, where Atlantic Avenue has now become the thoroughfare that Washington and Greenwich Streets were.

    Matthew Fenton

    photos by Robert Simko

    -----------------------------------------------------------------

    The grandparents of a friend of mine were Lebanese Maronite Christians who emigrated from The Levant to this neighborhood in the first decade of the 20th century.

  4. #169

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    As announced, the segment of Washington St between Albany and Carlisle Sts is closed to vehicles.

    Although there isn't much work involved in setting it up, it's still a shock to see these things done so fast, instead of the usual.


  5. #170

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    Great. We don't need more cars.

  6. #171
    Forum Veteran Tectonic's Avatar
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    City seems to be getting more crowded with cars though, especially Brooklyn.

  7. #172

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    New Residential Tower May Soar Above Historic Trinity Church
    By Irene Plagianos on July 2, 2013 6:42am | Updated 3 hrs ago

    http://www.dnainfo.com/new-york/2013...13727727820636

    Sad that they're considering tearing this beautiful pre-war building down. The Cook+Fox design is nice but too bad it's not proposed elsewhere. It's ridiculous that this and 22 Thames are up for demolition, when there's so much architectural garbage in the area like the old syms building, the Burger King, those awful school buildings along Trinity, the Battery Tunnel parking garage etc, etc.
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  8. #173

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    If they build above, I'm fine with it, but it would be a crime to raze that beautiful, old building.

  9. #174

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    How are they even considering demolishing this?!


    http://www.aviewoncities.com/img/nyc/sveus0404s.jpg

    The loss of 22 Thames was upsetting but bearable. This, however, would be a huge blow to Downtown's urban fabric. Given its visible position as a backdrop for one of the world's most famous intersections (Wall Street and Broadway), this tower has been an underscored but crucial element of the local streetscape for decades. They might as well replace Trinity Building with a glass condo midrise while they're at it.

  10. #175

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    Philistine's!


  11. #176

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    Downtown needs to be landmarked.

  12. #177

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    No it doesn't. It's already lost too much commercial occupancy. If they have to nuke all the old towers and replace them, to bring more firms into the area, they should have at it. It would be a good place to steer tech firms looking for space. A lot of those buildings are just straight up obsolete.

    Quote Originally Posted by londonlawyer View Post
    Downtown needs to be landmarked.

  13. #178

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    These a.s.sholes must be stopped!
    Quote Originally Posted by LeCom View Post
    How are they even considering demolishing this?!


    http://www.aviewoncities.com/img/nyc/sveus0404s.jpg

    The loss of 22 Thames was upsetting but bearable. This, however, would be a huge blow to Downtown's urban fabric. Given its visible position as a backdrop for one of the world's most famous intersections (Wall Street and Broadway), this tower has been an underscored but crucial element of the local streetscape for decades. They might as well replace Trinity Building with a glass condo midrise while they're at it.

  14. #179
    Fearless Photog RoldanTTLB's Avatar
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    I don't know. The top of this building is nice, but the bottom is nothing to write home about. I like the ASE building next door more. It's unclear why tearing this down instead of just renovating this would be better, although from the renderings, they are looking at an incredibly tall 25 story building. Note that nice buildings get torn down because they are owned by people with the desire to build while crappy buildings are not torn down because they are owned by people who lack that drive. The city isn't in any rush to rebuild something better a block from here at it's windowless high school cum prison.

  15. #180
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BBMW View Post
    No it doesn't. It's already lost too much commercial occupancy. If they have to nuke all the old towers and replace them, to bring more firms into the area, they should have at it. It would be a good place to steer tech firms looking for space. A lot of those buildings are just straight up obsolete.
    Wow.

    Since the plan for this Trinity building is to replace it with a residential condo, what relevance is there to your comment about commercial occupancy & business firms in regard to this proposal?

    Besides there's a few million square feet of new commercial space rising just a couple of blocks to the north. Plenty of room for firms there without tearing down any number of old beauties downtown.

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