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Thread: Greenwich St South Development

  1. #31

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    One of those buildings houses the Pussycat Lounge. Strip joints seem to be good preservatives for old buildings.

    Further uptown at 34 White St (and Church St) is another old survivor that once was the Baby Doll Lounge. I don't know when it arrived, but it was already an anachronism when I went in there in the 1970s. It survived relatively unchanged, save for bi-annual coats of the usual tacky paint schemes, until the end of the 20th century, but Giuliani and Gentrification did it in.

    Previously, it was a bar & grill called the Needle and Thread, a nod to the textile industry that dominated the area between Church and Broadway, from Canal to Worth.

    A menu from 1951




    The owners of Arqua Restaurant across the street leased the space and sandblasted it into respectability, opening a wine restaurant called Petrarca Vino e Cucina.



    Except for the first floor, not much renovation was needed.


    Before 1835, New York's commerce was east of Broadway, oriented toward the East River. That year, a wind-swept fire wiped out most of New York south of Wall St, destroying over 670 buildings including all the original Dutch town. Commerce began relocating further north and west, including textiles, which became centered on Worth St.
    http://www.tribeca.org/dispatcher.aspx?fm=5512&vm=5516


    Sorry for the detour.

  2. #32

    Default Battery Parking Garage

    I am reading many stories of plans to conver the Battery Parking Garage into a bus garage. What exactly does this mean? Will the structure be redone? I am guessing that a bus garage would still be large and unattractive??

    Can someone please elaborate?

  3. #33

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    Your confusing two different projects. The Port Authority is building an underground bus garage a few blocks up at Liberty Street for the WTC memorial. There was a separate, unrelated plan to spruce up the area around the Battery Garage (the subject of this thread), but it seems to have died from civic indifference.

  4. #34

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    are the plans really dead for the BB tunnel parkage?

  5. #35
    Forum Veteran macreator's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mumbles View Post
    are the plans really dead for the BB tunnel parkage?
    For now it looks like it, but I imagine in the long term the project will be revived by the MTA and the City when they'd like to cash in on what is potentially prime real estate.

  6. #36

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    Quote Originally Posted by mumbles View Post
    are the plans really dead for the BB tunnel parkage?
    No plan has been formulated by city government; the plan is a recommendation by LMDC as the result of a study.

    The one component that keeps this alive is the bus garage. The city is going to have to come up with a permanent place to store commuter buses if it wants to develop the East River waterfront.

    The planned garage at the WTC site 5 is not for commuter buses.

  7. #37
    Build the Tower Verre antinimby's Avatar
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    Why not take this bus garage entirely underground?

    There might be subway tunnels running underneath but I'm sure they can build around it somehow.

  8. #38
    Forum Veteran macreator's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by antinimby View Post
    Why not take this bus garage entirely underground?

    There might be subway tunnels running underneath but I'm sure they can build around it somehow.
    I think there were a lot of security concerns as well cost issues.

    Personally I'd like to see an underground parking depot but if an above ground one means an overhaul of the Battery Tunnel portal into developable parcels and a new park I'd be all for that.

  9. #39

    Default Sam Chang is a philistine!

    Obviously, this schmuck has erected tons of crap, but he has the BA.LLS to propose razing an 18th Century structure!!! Hopefully, the wimps (I have a stronger word in mind that starts with a "p" and ends with "ies") at the "Landmarks Commission" will stand up to the putz!

    In buildings Landmark battle, it’s topless bar v. hotelier
    by amy zimmer / metro new york

    > email this to a friend
    JAN 31, 2007

    CENTRE STREET. A bizarre fight at a Landmarks Preservation Commission hearing yesterday, over three late 18th century Federal-style houses on Greenwich Street, pitted one of New York’s most prolific hotel builders against the owner of a topless bar.

    Both claim to own 96 Greenwich St. and are waging that battle in state Supreme Court. The issue before Landmarks was preserving these rare examples of row houses once common in Lower Manhattan, buildings that famed New York Times architecture critic Ada Louise Huxtable called “accidental and anonymous survivors of the city’s early years.”

    Representatives for Sam Chang, whose McSam Hotel Group would like to demolish 96 Greenwich to make way for a 300-room four-star hotel, offered the LPC a deal.

    In exchange for not designating 96 Greenwich, they would pay for the restoration of the other two buildings on the docket — 94 and 94 1/2 Greenwich St. — which the hotel group does not own. The building is home to topless bar Pussycat Lounge and, Chang’s team argued, has been altered too much to merit landmark status.

    Meanwhile, the lounge’s owner Robert Kramer — who made alterations to 96 Greenwich in the 1970s — claimed he would undo the changes and pay to preserve the other row houses also.

    “The lintels of 94 Greenwich are brick, but the lintels at 96 are not,” Chang’s architect Gene Kaufman told the LPC, adding 96 lacked much of its original brickwork.

    “I know every beam, every brick of that building,” Kramer said. “I rebuilt that building. I can put it back the way it was. If any of the other buildings need some work, I don’t mind doing the work.”

    Robert Malmad, a patron of the Pussycat Lounge, told the LPC, “It seems a little ludicrous for an architect to come in here and say, ‘We’ll save two, but not the third.’ All three represent a unique and singular part of American history.”

    These buildings were survivors, he said. They survived Robert Moses’ Brooklyn-Battery Tunnel and they survived 9/11.

    “You can look at 96 Greenwich and say, ‘Well, it’s a bar. Maybe it’s a topless bar. How terrible!’ But that’s only a small part of the building’s life,” Malmad said. “For more than 200 years [people] have used the building. It has earned its right of life. For an architect to say it’s because of lintels — I’ve never heard such picayune facts.”


    Up next

    In 2003, the NYC Landmarks Conservancy and Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation submitted a proposal to the LPC to designate these and 10 other Federal row houses. Five have been designated. The LPC said it would take testimony on the Greenwich Street houses for the next 10 days.

  10. #40

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    These buildings are on the Historic Districts Council list of endangered buildings.

    There was an LPC hearing in 1970, but they were not designated.

    http://www.hdc.org/Heard%20But%20Not...0for%20web.pdf

    Go to page 8. There is a link to CM Alan Gerson. Send him an email.

    Make a donation to the HDC

  11. #41

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    Thanks for the info. Losing the beautiful, white terracotta building on Trinity is bad enough but losing these historic structures would be devastating.

  12. #42
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    More info on 94-96 Greenwich:

    Hidden Corners of Lower Manhattan

    nytimes.com
    By DAVID W. DUNLAP
    September 15, 1991

    ... Around the corner is an extraordinary triplet of Georgian row houses, 94-96 Greenwich Street, built by Augustine H. Lawrence in 1798-99. The very existence of a cohesive 18th-century group is astonishing enough, but the corner house -- once home to a merchant and alderman named Jonathan Lawrence -- is also in remarkably good condition above the loud storefronts on the first floor. Nine windows overlooking Rector Street have elegant splayed lintels with double keystones. Above them, the outline of the original steeply pitched roof can be discerned.

    More on this from 2005 ...

    94 Greenwich Street
    http://testofwill.blogspot.com/2005_03_01_archive.html
    March 2005




    It isn't usually news when a deli or pizzeria closes in New York city, particularly when there are others 30 feet away or less, but the closing of Lord's Deli and it's adjacent pizza place is kind of significant in this case. 94 Greenwich is part of a strip of buildings being considered for historic preservation.
    "[F]our small houses on Greenwich Street south of the World Trade Center site—numbers 67, 94, 941/2 and 96—have withstood almost 200 years of Downtown development, providing glimpses of lost streetscapes and bygone eras."
    // posted by Will @ 5:55 PM

  13. #43
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    94 Greenwich St.


    http://ebo.nylandmarks.org/eb_view.php?id=2336&pg=1


    94 Greenwich St.

    Like 67 Greenwich Street, 94 Greenwich Street is a remarkable survivor of the early Federal era. Dating from 1798, the building and its two equally venerable neighbors at 94 1/2 and 96 (each under different ownership) are partially vacant and neglected. 94 Greenwich Street was heard by the Landmarks Preservation Commission in 1970, but not designated. It has not yet been declared eligible for the National Register.

    94 Greenwich Street is one of three adjacent row-houses which anchor the northwest corner of Rector and Greenwich Streets in Lower Manhattan. The others are 94-1/2 and 96 Greenwich Street. The buildings retain much of their original Federal-era detail, including Flemish Bond brickwork, original window lintels and sills. The southern façade shows the ghost of the original sloped roof, altered, as so many Federal era buildings were, to accommodate new uses in mid-19th century. By 1859, the original dormers had been removed from 94 Greenwich and the full fourth floor constructed.

    These three survivors from another era are not protected by City landmark designation. The New York Landmarks Conservancy has partnered with the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation on an advocacy campaign to convince the Landmarks Preservation Commission to confer landmark status on a total of thirteen such buildings in Lower Manhattan, including 94, 94-1/2, and 96 Greenwich Street. By mid-2006, the Commission has responded by designating five buildings on this list, but not yet these three on lower Greenwich Street.

    Today, No. 94 is in deteriorated condition and appears vacant or little-used. Its appearance and condition also detracts from appreciating the two neighboring historic row-houses.

    Address:
    94 Greenwich St.
    Lower Manhattan, Manhattan, New York 10006
    Ranking Red
    Condition Poor
    Architect/Builder unknown
    Year Built 1798
    Predominant Materials Masonry
    NYC Designation Status Heard But Not Designated
    National Designation Status
    Lot Width 20
    Lot Depth 94
    Building Width 19
    Building Depth 91
    Zoning C6
    ***

  14. #44

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    1798 !!

    Disgraceful that these aren't landmarked.

    All buildings should be automatically landmarked when they reach 200.

  15. #45

    Cool

    this will upset some people, but i am totally not seeing that building as anything that i care to look at.

    in fact, it kinda looks like the best western at 38th street that mcsam wants to build here, but older.

    I would rather keep this building than have a mcsam, but otherwise, I am not seeing why it is so important that it should be preserved forever.

    just mho.

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