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Thread: The Urban Glass House - 330 Spring Street - Condo - by Philip Johnson

  1. #46

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    Quote Originally Posted by lofter1
    Are you saying that the marketing crew might be stretching the truth
    Can't imagine that ever happening....

  2. #47
    The Dude Abides
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  3. #48
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    Looks much better with the interior lights aglow ...

  4. #49

    Default that area

    I took a walk around that area this past weekend and with all of the new buildings starting to finish up it is really becoming a nice alley of development. Some of the buildings look nicer than others but still kind of cool...even the vent looks kind of interesting next to these buildings.

    The trump project on spring st would actually fit in well.

  5. #50

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    It fits the neighborhood very vell. I visited a loft nearby not too long ago, and saw a whole bunch of ultramodern midrisers such as that one, some much more radical, sprinkled evenly around the nearby blocks. And I was afriad that that type of thing wouldn't fit there.

  6. #51
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    Gotta get down there sometime. It's been at least a year, and the area is probably hardly recognizable.

    This one seems to have come out better than the renderings. Can't say that too often. If I'd never known about the original proposal, I would think this is a very good new building.

  7. #52
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    When you all go down that way notice that all of the new residential top out at around 12 - 15 stories. That is also the tallest of the manufacturing / commercial buildings in the area. The only building taller currently in Hudson Square is the union-owned building on 6th Ave / Watts st. that is ~25 stories.

    Just so you can put the Trump 46-story proposal in perspective. IMO the height of the Trump Condo-tel in relation to this area is one of it's big plusses -- if only that gang could get their zoning / building proposal in line.

  8. #53

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    Quote Originally Posted by lofter1
    When you all go down that way notice that all of the new residential top out at around 12 - 15 stories. That is also the tallest of the manufacturing / commercial buildings in the area. The only building taller currently in Hudson Square is the union-owned building on 6th Ave / Watts st. that is ~25 stories.

    Just so you can put the Trump 46-story proposal in perspective. IMO the height of the Trump Condo-tel in relation to this area is one of it's big plusses -- if only that gang could get their zoning / building proposal in line.
    Well said...The Trump could be a real addition to the skyline of lower manhattan...the site www.trumpsoho.com does a decent job of putting in perspective.

    On UGH, I think Johnson would be proud if he had been able to see how this turned out

  9. #54
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    Uploaded on September 6, 2006 by lisacchamberlain

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    /\ Cool

  11. #56
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    Looks better ^^^ in pictures than it does from the sidewalk

  12. #57

    Default at night....

    I am interested to see how it will look at night once it is occupied and lights are on....could be a very cool effect

  13. #58

    Default interiors

    A friend of mine just saw a finished interior at UGH and says they look amazing. In fact he thought the interior outdid the exterior....

  14. #59
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    Yeah, UGH look fantastic

  15. #60

    Default Interesting piece on TUGH and the Ear Inn

    November 6, 2006 Edition > Section: New York > Printer-Friendly Version
    A Gleaming Urban Glass House Astonishes Spring Street

    BY DAVID LOMBINO - Staff Reporter of the Sun
    November 6, 2006
    URL: http://www.nysun.com/article/42921

    Thirty years ago, there was a permanent fire burning in an old oil drum on the corner of Washington and Spring streets, a stone's throw from the Hudson River in Lower Manhattan. Longshoremen fueled the fire with wood slats they brought from the docks as they made their way to the local bar for a drink.
    The bar — the Ear Inn — is still standing, housed in the James Brown House, erected in 1817.
    The fire has gone out. In its place is a gleaming 11-story condominium tower called the Urban Glass House, the last building designed by the architect Philip Johnson before he died last year. Eighty percent of the apartments have sold, and the remainder are on the market for between $2 million and $4 million. Recently, the building received its certificate of occupancy, and residents soon will be moving in.
    For the owner of the building that houses the Ear Inn, Rip Hayman, the neighborhood's evolution is nothing less than astonishing. As a student at Columbia University in 1973, he rented a room upstairs from the bar in a "pay-by-the-hour house" with no light, heat, or water for about $25 a month. Until the wee hours, longshoremen and merchant sailors drank downstairs in the bar, known then only as "the green door."
    "It was an elderly and fossilized crowd, by drinking mainly," he said. "If you came in and they didn't know you, they stared at you until you left."
    His neighbors included a spice factory and a garbage-hauling company that served the Fulton Fish Market.
    "It was pungent," Mr. Hayman said while drinking a pint of cider. "There were very few residents. It was a wilderness. A dying tale of the marine industry in Manhattan."
    Now, people are buying up "million-dollar shoeboxes" next door.
    "It's a whole new neighborhood. A big tide of concrete and Pradas," Mr. Hayman said. "Lots of poodles and house plants."
    In 2003, the city rezoned the blocks around the Ear Inn, located west of Hudson Street and north of Canal Street, to permit residential development in an area that for centuries was dominated by manufacturing. The result was the complete transformation of a largely anonymous neighborhood, and a spate of luxury condominium towers rising like weeds in a corner of Manhattan that has housed few residents since the Holland Tunnel was built there in the 1920s.
    A biotech company, ImClone, has leased space across the street from the Ear Inn for its corporate headquarters. Within a three-block radius, at least half a dozen new residential projects are rising. Donald Trump is planning to build a 45-story hotel about three blocks to the east. A large parking lot across the street with river views, owned by the Port Authority, is a prime target for development in the years ahead.
    Mr. Hayman was part of a group that acquired the James Brown House in the late 1970s. The group restored the bar, and it became a colorful hangout for a mix of artists, musicians, and locals. Mr. Hayman ran an indie publishing house upstairs. The building was one of the earliest designations of the city's Landmarks Commission, in 1969. Later on, to avoid the red tape associated with installing a new sign on a landmarked building, Mr. Hayman and his friends painted part of the neon "Bar" sign to make it read "Ear."
    Mr. Hayman said the Ear Inn has always welcomed all kinds of customers, but he admits: "Part of me misses the old garbage companies and the rats."
    In the mid-1980s, Susan La Rosa was a regular customer while studying for a master's degree at New York University. She said she was a big fan of the "chicken cream cognac" and the regular poetry readings. She earned a grant at the time to study the history of the building.
    "It was kind of a hip scene," Ms. La Rosa said on a recent visit. "Nobody lived down here. Nobody was even around here. It was a total pit."
    "All of New York was more bohemian back then. It was a land of more possibilities and undiscovered places. You could disappear," she said.
    Pointing out the low, sagging beadboard ceilings and a display of dusty bottles excavated from below the building, she said the bar retained its gritty charm despite the surrounding development.
    "It links the old neighborhood with the new," Ms. La Rosa said.
    On a Friday night, she said the Ear Inn was more crowded than she had ever seen it, although the crowd, she said, was a little bit more upscale.
    The Ear Inn now serves high-end pub fare, with $8 burgers, filet of sole, mussels in white wine sauce, and smoked trout. It is still a "cell phone free zone." A sign in the window reads: "Due to gentrification, the Ear Inn now allows poodles."
    At lunchtime, the bar is bustling with office workers from the surrounding neighborhood, which is popular with creative industries. The afternoon is slow, with regulars flipping through newspapers and a handful of savvy tourists having made the discovery. In the evening, a young, stylish crowd arrives for happy hour and dinner. It is a favorite stop for motorcycle tours of New York. Manhattan's district attorney, Robert Morgenthau, is an occasional visitor.
    "He has found a place that makes him feel young," Mr. Hayman said of the 87-year-old DA.
    For the last year and a half, scaffolding masked the Ear Inn as the apartments rose to the west and renovations were made to the former tenement building to the east. Over that span, Mr. Hayman said business "limped along at half-trade. It has survived, but under duress."
    In 2002, he sold air rights to Antonio Vendome, a local restaurateur, who then sold the adjacent land he controlled to the developers of the Urban Glass House. In exchange, the developers have paid for hundreds of thousands of dollars of repairs and improvements to the Ear Inn, including a backyard fire escape. The building is one of the few remaining wooden structures in the city.
    "This house will permanently be safer because of their development," Mr. Hayman said.
    Youthful and charismatic in his mid-50s, Mr. Hayman left a few years ago, and now lives in Rockland County with his family.
    "When plaster crashed down on my bed, I knew it was time to move on," he said.

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