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Thread: Is 5th Ave really living up to it's potential?

  1. #76

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    Guess there is no thread for the Magellan (doesn't deserve one anyway). A few articles in this thread mention the building so here are some pics from yesterday.

    The Magellan
    35-39 West 33rd Street
    34 stories 348 feet
    H. Thomas O'Hara Architects
    Dev-Pitcairn Properties
    Residential Rental
    155,918 ft² 168 units
    $61,000,000.00
    Completed June 3, 2002-Fall 2003







    I think that's stone. Too bad the entrance is surrounded by loading docks, in fact all of 33rd street is like a big dark loading dock.



    Last edited by Derek2k3; January 4th, 2007 at 10:54 PM.

  2. #77
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    The work of a total hack ^^^

    Can anyone explain the blank walls & corners on the inset at the center of the building on the upper floors?

  3. #78
    The Dude Abides
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    Quote Originally Posted by Derek2k3 View Post
    Too bad the entrance is surrounded by loading docks, in fact all of 33rd street is like a big dark loading dock.
    As are swaths of 41st and 58th streets. So goes the fate of the streets adjacent to the major east-west thoroughfares.

  4. #79

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    That building is a disgrace on its own, made even worse by the fact that it's on the same block as the one of the world's landmarks. Thomas O'Hara surely has no shame.

  5. #80
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    April 2007

    Library lions gaze at new retail row

    Fashion brands H & M, BCBG join P. Diddy on 5th in low 40s


    By Rachel Deahl

    Looks like a few trendy designers are reading up. Some big names in apparel -- P. Diddy's Sean John, H & M and now BCBG Max Azria -- have moved to an unlikely locale: Fifth Avenue in the low 40s, in sight of the New York Public Library.

    Once a hodgepodge of low-end shops, delis and lunch counters catering to office workers and suburban commuters around Grand Central Terminal, the area is perhaps becoming an extension of the famed retail corridor a bit farther uptown. The change happening around the watchful gazes of the library lions indicates the area will attract fashion elites as well as literary elites.

    Swedish cheap chic retailer H & M closed on a deal for 25,000 square feet of retail space at 505 Fifth Avenue in July 2006, paying $350 a square foot, according to a report in the New York Post. That's drawn other fashion brands, as well as developers, to the neighborhood.

    BCBG in February signed a 10-year lease for 14,398 square feet at 461 Fifth Avenue, across the street from the library headquarters.

    Steven Durels, executive vice president at SL Green, said the move "underscores the growing appeal of Fifth Avenue below 42nd Street." He also said the urban label Sean John, as well as H & M, have made the 40s a clothiers' hot spot.

    Developer Joseph Moinian bought several buildings in the area. Moinian recently closed on 417 Fifth Avenue at 38th Street for $250 million. The building, built in 1912, is 11 stories high and has 392,000 square feet. Anchor tenants include Atari and Marvel Entertainment. The deal included some 80,000 square feet of air rights.

    According to a number of brokers and experts, the 40s around Fifth Avenue is an undervalued area.

    Though retail rents all over Manhattan are rising, the range of average rent estimates vary widely here. One broker said this area currently commands an average of $225 to $300 per square foot, while another broker figured rents on Fifth Avenue could fetch up to $600 per square foot. Still, when compared with Fifth Avenue rents in the 50s, the area offers major bargains. One broker said rents for ground-floor locations to the north can command up to $1,500 per square foot.

    Ray Cirz, CEO and managing director of the Manhattan office of Integra Realty Resources, said the changes are long overdue. The 1992 reopening of Bryant Park was a turning point, but the shift in prices has been one of the last shifts in the district's fortunes.

    "It used to be dangerous, drug-infested," he said. Grand Central's rehabilitation in late '90s and the construction of the Bear Stearns Building at 383 Madison in 1999 are among other milestones in the neighborhood's improvement.

    He said the area's future as a shopping hub remains uncertain, though "these stores will certainly increase foot traffic and put upward pressure on rent."

    There are currently three large multi-level spaces available in the area -- 500 Fifth at the northwest corner of 42nd Street, 521 Fifth at the southeast corner of 43rd and 530 Fifth at the southwest corner of 44th -- and the next tenants will influence the flavor of the library district's retail focus.

    Retailers would benefit from the high concentration of office workers in the area. The 40s have an estimated 5,000 office workers for every 1 million square feet of office space.

    In a survey last year of the most-trafficked retail intersections by brokerage Newmark Knight Frank, 42nd and Fifth Avenue recorded 6,600 pedestrians per hour at peak times.

    The weekends are still a sharp contrast, as the Grand Central-Bryant Park corridor is nearly empty then. But there are some 14,500 households with an average annual income of $110,000 within a half-mile radius of 505 Fifth, according to Cirz.

    Karen Bellantoni, senior vice president at Robert K. Futterman & Associates, thinks high-fashion brands may turn away from considering the area as more mainstream retailers move in.

    "Many new leases have been signed [there] in the last two years," she explained. "It's my belief that many more blocks of space will turn over to more big-box retailers and moderate fashion tenants."

    Sean John was one of the first stores to bring the area more upscale.

    Steven Greenberg, president of the Greenberg Group, brokered the deal that brought Sean John to its sole Manhattan retail location three years ago. He said the low rent was a big factor in the hip-hop label's decision to set up shop at 475 Fifth Avenue, across from the library, and it's still a draw for other fashion brands.

    He didn't reveal the rent per square foot, but said the company brokered a deal that was "significantly under today's market for getting there early."

    When Sean John moved in, rents ranged from $150 to $200 a square foot.

    Greenberg said that rents in the low 40s are steadily rising, and keep pace with the increases in the 50s. "Rents in the 50s along Fifth were 20 to 25 percent lower five years ago, and rents in the 40s along Fifth are probably escalating at the same pace, and therefore still staying substantially lower than in the 50s," he said.

    "Historically, what's happened on key fashion streets, like Rodeo Drive in L.A. or Newbury Street in Boston, is that once the street fills up and rents [become prohibitive], the street will expand and move either east and west or north and south," Greenberg added. "In this case we thought Fifth would move south; there's plenty of room, and lots of space." Greenberg said office building owners in the area will ultimately shape its future.

    "The problem I see is that a lot of the office building owners in the 40s are less motivated to hold out for a nicer-looking tenant [on the ground floor]," he said, noting that landlords are most interested in closing on the first tenant who makes an offer, regardless of what kind of vendor they are.

    Also, when timing isn't a factor, Greenberg said many fashion clients may want to pay less per square foot than other businesses. Nonetheless, he thinks landlords who wait, or take slightly less rent on the first floor, could make out better in the long run.

    While the retail market has been strong, Greenberg said many New York landlords who manage office building are too focused on everything above the ground floor because of the hot market for office space.

    Copyright © 2003-2007 The Real Deal.

  6. #81
    Crabby airline hostess - stache's Avatar
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    Of these retailers, the only one possibly considered upscale is BCBG, and in a department store it would be considered 'moderate'.

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    Forum Veteran macreator's Avatar
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    I was walking down Fifth Avenue today and couldn't help but think of this thread. The street was booming, but I found myself noticing how shabby the streetscape (streetlamps, sidewalk, crosswalks, street furniture, and the street surface itself) appeared.

    I'd love to see the City invest in sprucing up the avenue in a uniform way with more street trees or shrubs, new streetlights (either retro-style or Grand Central Partnership style), granite sidewalks, and brick crosswalks. I know this would be a large capital investment, but after mentally comparing the state of Fifth Avenue's street infrastructure with that of other parts of Midtown, especially blocks covered by the Grand Central Partnership, I couldn't help but find it to be a necessary investment in such a prestigious retail corridor as Fifth Avenue. I'd like to see the same investments made on lower Broadway south of Houston.

    Hey, if Chicago can produce an overwhelmingly more beautiful retail boulevard in the form of the Magnificent Mile, where uniform street trees with flower beds create a fantastic atmosphere, New York can do it much better.

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    Quote Originally Posted by macreator View Post
    I was walking down Fifth Avenue today and couldn't help but think of this thread. The street was booming, but I found myself noticing how shabby the streetscape (streetlamps, sidewalk, crosswalks, street furniture, and the street surface itself) appeared.

    I'd love to see the City invest in sprucing up the avenue in a uniform way with more street trees or shrubs, new streetlights (either retro-style or Grand Central Partnership style), granite sidewalks, and brick crosswalks. I know this would be a large capital investment, but after mentally comparing the state of Fifth Avenue's street infrastructure with that of other parts of Midtown, especially blocks covered by the Grand Central Partnership, I couldn't help but find it to be a necessary investment in such a prestigious retail corridor as Fifth Avenue. I'd like to see the same investments made on lower Broadway south of Houston.

    Hey, if Chicago can produce an overwhelmingly more beautiful retail boulevard in the form of the Magnificent Mile, where uniform street trees with flower beds create a fantastic atmosphere, New York can do it much better.


    I think the reason why 5th Ave's streetscape is the way it is right now is because they city (& corporations) know that it has enough fame and prestige as it is. They dont need to spruce things up. They dont need to beautify the streets or make pretty lights. The streets are congested. They are at full capacity. No need for benches or flowers because if you're walking along 5th Ave, you better be there to spend money. Not to take in the sights

  9. #84
    Crabby airline hostess - stache's Avatar
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    Michigan Ave. has the lake going for it too.

  10. #85

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    Quote Originally Posted by clubBR View Post


    I think the reason why 5th Ave's streetscape is the way it is right now is because they city (& corporations) know that it has enough fame and prestige as it is. They dont need to spruce things up. They dont need to beautify the streets or make pretty lights. The streets are congested. They are at full capacity. No need for benches or flowers because if you're walking along 5th Ave, you better be there to spend money. Not to take in the sights
    The stretch of 5th between 42nd and 49th is the very worst part of 5th in every respect -- particularly architecturally.

  11. #86

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    Streetscapes | Schrafft’s

    Midday Havens, Lost to a Faster-Paced City

    Left, Shalat Architects; Right, Hiroko Masuike for The New York Times
    A CHAIN WITH WARMTH The Schrafft's restaurant at Fifth Avenue and 13th Street, as it looked around 1940, left, and as the building looks now.

    By CHRISTOPHER GRAY
    Published: June 29, 2008

    NEW YORK is full of institutions that seem indispensable until, only a few decades later, they vanish without a trace. Schrafft’s, the lunchroom and candy and ice cream maker, was like that — a vibrant recollection in the minds of people over 50-something, but a mute hieroglyph to those born after Nixon was president.

    Shalat Architects
    Another Schrafft's, at 79th Street between Lexington and Third Avenues, had a marble front with a rooftop arcade.

    Shalat Architects
    The interior was as elegant as the exterior.

    Yet Schrafft’s did leave a few physical traces on the New York landscape; one is its old two-story restaurant at 13th Street and Fifth Avenue, which these days looks as though it survived a bombing campaign.

    Frank G. Shattuck started out in 1898 with a chain of stores selling the candy of the Boston confectioner William G. Schrafft, but soon expanded into lunch service. Unescorted women felt safer in chain restaurants, and from its early days Schrafft’s had a feminine cast.

    The appearance of the first Schrafft’s restaurants is unrecorded, but by the 1910s Mr. Shattuck was working with Charles E. Birge, the favored architect of the Hearst real estate interests.

    His 1917 Schrafft’s at 20 West 38th Street is a crisp and sophisticated adaptation of the Renaissance. In 1926 Mr. Birge remodeled the majestic old Knoedler Gallery at 556 Fifth Avenue into a new Schrafft’s, keeping the 28-foot-high ceilings and marble columns, and adding a stunning bronze and black enamel storefront.

    The chain sought associations with the well-to-do, or at least comfortable, and the typical restaurant was a relaxed white-tablecloth retreat from the midday hustle of the city. By 1928, according to an article published that year in The New Yorker, the revenue from lunch was a million dollars a month, and in a few years there were 43 stores in the region.

    Schrafft’s switched to the architects Bloch & Hesse in the 1930s, and they began wiping away the dignified bronze classicism of Mr. Birge’s time, replacing it with modernist marble.

    Bloch & Hesse also did at least two entirely new buildings for the chain.

    Their one-story Schrafft’s at 155 East 79th Street has a marble front with a rooftop arcade and recessed niche at one side.

    At 61 Fifth Avenue, at the southeast corner of 13th Street, the architects gave a light curve to the front, so the distinctive raised Schrafft’s lettering was visible from several blocks north.

    Published versions of earlier designs show a jazzier approach, reminiscent of a streamlined radio. But Schrafft’s opted for “a modern Colonial structure designed to harmonize with the architecture of the interesting old houses in this neighborhood,” as The New York Times put it in 1938.
    Indeed, at 13th Street the chain stuck close to the most conservative kind of modernism, with giant pilasters and multilight windows that would not have been out of place on a turn-of-the-century women’s club. A small panel of glass block on the side street was about as modern as it got.

    The New Yorker critic Lewis Mumford preferred the outright modernism of the competing Longchamps, designed by Winold Reiss, and considered Bloch & Hesse’s work “pretty bad” — the curved front at 13th Street simply “the new cliché.”

    But Schrafft’s was all about the comfort of creamed chicken, lobster Newburg and banana splits, so the architecture had to be comfortable, too.

    In an interview in The Times in 2004, Mr. Shattuck’s great-grandson Frank M. Shattuck said of the chain’s clientele: “Everyone wore hats and handmade suits. And if you were a lady, it was safe to sit at the soda fountain and drink gin from a teacup.”

    As the world changed in the 1960s, Schrafft’s tried to change along with it, opening a chain of motels, selling off the candy business and emphasizing men-only sections.

    But by the 1970s the Schrafft’s chain was dwindling; most of the restaurants closed within a decade or so. At the closing of a Schrafft’s on West 23rd Street in 1972, one longtime patron mourned that eating was now “all rush and hubbub — this place has warmth.”

    The restaurant at 155 East 79th Street is now an art and furniture store, but 61 Fifth Avenue has fallen far from its original station. In the 1980s it was the Lone Star Café, with a giant iguana on the roof and a most unladylike banner across the parapet reading, “Too Much Ain’t Enough.”

    It was later a vegetable market, but in 2006 it was gutted by fire. The heat blistered the paint on the marble, and big panels have popped off the facade.

    Now the architect Alta Indelman says she is working on a design for a 10-story apartment house with one triplex, three duplexes and ground-floor retailing. She said that she had considered trying to salvage some of the Schrafft’s facade but that it was too far gone.

    As for the apartment house, which is being designed for an owner who bought the site this year, she says plans are still in flux but she will probably produce “a contemporary interpretation of the Fifth Avenue apartment houses in the neighborhood” — the same goal of harmony that Schrafft’s sought 70 years ago.

    E-mail: streetscapes@nytimes.com

    http://www.nytimes.com/2008/06/29/re...ref=realestate

    Copyright 2008 The New York Times Company

  12. #87

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    ^

    Alta Indelman
    Apartment Building Design – New 5th Ave. Condominium



    New 5th Avenue Condominium (artist’s rendering)

    Completion: Scheduled for Summer 2011

    This 10-story building under construction in Greenwich Village is intended for mixed-use, with retail on the ground floor and spacious condominium apartments on the upper floors. There will be three duplexes, each encompassing two floors, and one triplex, comprised of the top three floors. The building’s custom detailed limestone and brick exterior has been carefully designed to respect the lower 5th Avenue neighborhood. The building will be LEED-certified.

  13. #88
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    Curbed did a report on that one at 61 Fifth about a year ago, but it's been stalled. Just recently work started up again. There's now some reinfored concrete rising above the street.

  14. #89

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    I think that 5th between 42nd Street and the Washington Square Arch is the best part, as it has many stunning buildings. However, some certainly need TLC, and the retail in the part between 49th and 23rd is uniformly crappy.

    The only part of 5th that sucks and that looks very drab is the stretch between 42nd and 49th. Many of those buildings should be razed, including, but not limited to:

    1. The POS north of the Fred French building must go.



    2. Moinian's POS at 530 5th must go.


    3. Sadly, the once-beautiful Phillipines Airlines building has been destroyed and now just looks like crap.



    4. Stawski's building is a disgusting eyesore, as is the little POS just north of it.


    5. 589 5th is crap.


    6. Silverstein's pile of crap at 520 5th must go.




    7. The 592 5th (i.e., the white POS around 48th on the west side of 5th with the BofA branch) and 590 5th, the black glass POS just south of it, must go.

    8. The Safra National Bank building looks cheap, but at least it's somewhat clean.

    9. 666 5th and the tall, boxes near it suck too.

    10. The crap black box Rolex building on the east side of 53rd and 5th must go.

    It is quite sad that Khandahar-on-Hudson once was as beautiful as London.

    Last edited by londonlawyer; September 20th, 2010 at 11:06 PM.

  15. #90
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    There is a trio of magnificent stepped back buildings with narrow towers on the east side of Fifth just north of 42nd, the Fred F. French Building at 551 Fifth (between 45th / 46th) being the northernmost of the three (and the crowning glory).

    The others: Lefcourt National Building at 521 Fifth (43rd / 44th) and 535 Fifth (44th / 45th).

    They should all be saved and protected.

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