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Thread: Forbes Most Expensive Zip Codes

  1. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Law & Order

    ...[Alex Ballard] you are 17.

    I am younger than you...
    Considering both your ages and life experience to date, I am extremely impressed with your knowledge and your arguments in this forum. The schools in this country are clearly not all failures and our youth are not all slacker, apathetic, uninterested and disengaged.

    NewYorkYankee is another younger poster off to college next term and Gulcrapek is the whiz kid - who has his fingers in everything and posts stuff that none of us would ever find or see otherwise.

    My age will remain a loosely held secret, but it is fair to say I'm somewhere between your ages and death.

    Shadenfrau and I tend to agree on most topics, but I will encourage you all to stay engaged here and keep posting. I think I posted elsewhere that Alex needs to expand and build on his arguments or, at least, allow room for them to evolve. I think you both have pretty mature views of the world at this point and particularly well reasoned, considering your experiences to date. I think a good contrasting poster would be PHL. He had wonderful enthusiasm, but lacked depth of understanding or the interest in developing it. He just wanted everything "tall" for no other reason than "tall = good". There's not much to talk about there.

    And, if you are on this forum during your summer break, I think it is a pretty good place to get educated. The maturity of the posters, adherence to basic rules of courtesy and respect and knowlegeable moderators has created an inimitable site.

    I'm glad I checked in here. Knowing a bit of your backgrounds allows me to read your posts with a better undestanding of your perspectives.

    Cheers-
    Last edited by BrooklynRider; June 22nd, 2005 at 09:52 AM.

  2. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by BrooklynRider
    Considering both your ages and life experience to date, I am extremely impressed with your knowledge and your arguments in this forum.
    Quote Originally Posted by BrooklynRider
    Alex needs to expand and build on his arguments or, at least, allow room for them to evolve. I think you both have pretty mature views of the world at this point and particularly well reasoned, considering your experiences to date.
    BrooklynRider - with all due respect, I don't think this kind of patronizing compliment is constructive. A person learns limits in life - and shapes their self-image through honest feedback. False positive feedback feels good to give - and to get, but I think it creates a false confidence that does more harm than good. Alex is not making "well reasoned" arguments or displaying a mature world view - just the opposite, and I think it's a disservice to both he and the rest of the forum to encourage his current behavior. This is an adult forum, and to treat any participant as anything but is just setting them up for a harsh fall - and encouraging more flaming for the rest of us.

  3. #33
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    In previous posts, Alex laid out his background and his views. I don't think his posts are "childish" as much as they are uninformed and limited to his worldview. He is engaged in this forum and posting within the rules and constraints we all abide by. This is a forum that attracts adults because of the willingness of the participants to post by the rules and the steadfastness of the administrator and moderator to enforce the rules. There is no "over 18 only" rule and no rule that only adults (by whatever definition) are permitted. And, frankly, there is no way to enforce a rule like that other than using "Adultcheck" or a similar pay service.

    You can look back two years ago and see posts from Gulcrapek when he was 16 that would be indistinguishable from a post by a 50-year old in the AEC industry.

    Your suggestion that I don't "patronize" is duly noted. Now I suggest you back off from determining that a person should receive lesser respect based on age and accept that there are both facts and opinions posted here. We can take anyone to task for inaccuarate facts. That is done very effectively here and that is why this isn't a rumor mill like SSP. However, your total disregard for other's opinions, especially given the attempts to explain the foundation from which they spring, as Alex has done, is 180 degrees from "patronizing". It is down right rude.

    We've had our share of assholes on here and immature posters. I think Alex's body of posts represent a person who is neither of those two things. No, he does not live in NYC. He is passionate about NYC. He is interested in NYC development and growth. He poses theories, asks questions, responds in kind and generally is an active and courteous member. He is young and his views will evolve as he interacts with people of varying backgrounds and views. For a 17 year old, I think he has been pretty resourceful in finding this place, using it and learning. At the end of the day, he is smarter and more informed.

    You bet I'm going to back him up and the other young posters. Sometimes their "ignorance" actually produces some very interesting questions and challenges other "adult" posters.

    Rathering than taking the easy and pompous "rude and dismissive" route, I 'd rather encourage them, precisely because they are here and they are not idiots. We know they are younger. They admit it. We build that into our consideration of their posts. We can be critics or we can be mentors. My upbringing has molded me toward the latter in these situations.

  4. #34

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    Hey, I only want what's best for people. I don't hate NIMBYs on a personal level, it's the concept of NIMBYism that I feel immense hate for.

    In my life, I have had a lot of experiences with "selfishness". I consider myslef very unselfish and willing to help.

    When I see NIMBYism, I see it as a form of "selfishness". I see the desire to put one's own needs ahead of a community on a communtiy wide scale. When you move, you do think of your needs, not the place you left behind. But with NIMBYism, you purposely use your power to inflict upon others your deisres.

    Compromise is good. But when you put your view of the river [example] over the building of a communtiy center for neighborhood youth...I'm sorry...you're wrong and deserve to bear the brunt of your immorals.

    Again, buidling to me is nirvana. I live to build. Build relationships, build Skscrpaers, Build new ideas...I want to build buidlings someday. Which is why this has hit me to the core.


    I'm sorry if I have offended you or if I try to slam your views. Most are understandable. But my heart is in buidling. I simply don't understand why people can be so against cities, buidlings, and neighborhoods.





    [although, it is importaint to note that some buidling I object to. Highways, housing projects, jails, and stuff that ruins an area I do object to. For me, it's all about building to make a place better. Some projects accomplish the opposite]

  5. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by BrooklynRider
    In previous posts, Alex laid out his background and his views. I don't think his posts are "childish" as much as they are uninformed and limited to his worldview. He is engaged in this forum and posting within the rules and constraints we all abide by. This is a forum that attracts adults because of the willingness of the participants to post by the rules and the steadfastness of the administrator and moderator to enforce the rules. There is no "over 18 only" rule and no rule that only adults (by whatever definition) are permitted. And, frankly, there is no way to enforce a rule like that other than using "Adultcheck" or a similar pay service.
    I haven't suggested anything like banning or limiting an age. What I said is that everyone be treated the same regardless of age. I've never seen anyone criticize Gulcrapek because his posts are intelligent and informative - not "considering his age" but compared to anyone that posts. It is patronizing to treat younger people differently because of their age. Age isn't the issue here, but the quality of the posts and their antagonism. People (I'm not the only one) are being very critical because there is valid criticism to be made - and you appear to be dismissing that criticism in an effort to be nurturing?

    Quote Originally Posted by BrooklynRider
    However, your total disregard for other's opinions, especially given the attempts to explain the foundation from which they spring, as Alex has done, is 180 degrees from "patronizing". It is down right rude.
    I'm sorry if you've taken any of my posts as rude. Keeping in mind how combative it will come across, I would ask you to review your own posts in the Orion thread. You were provocative in the least, and certainly did not spare anyone's feelings.

    Aside from times where I have been quite frustrated (such as now) I try to address an idea and not an individual. I am confident in my opinions when I express them, and humble enough to respond to criticism or elaborate on poorly expressed ideas. I expect the same from other people, and don't take offense when they disagree with me. The open exchange of different ideas is the most valuable thing the internet has to offer.

    Quote Originally Posted by BrooklynRider
    Rathering than taking the easy and pompous "rude and dismissive" route, I 'd rather encourage them, precisely because they are here and they are not idiots. We know they are younger. They admit it. We build that into our consideration of their posts. We can be critics or we can be mentors. My upbringing has molded me toward the latter in these situations.
    Again, I would suggest that this is a patronizing attitude, and the internet is an altogether inadequate, inefficient and inappropriate replacement for real emotional relationships.

  6. #36

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    Ryan:

    I can take your critisims, as long as the return is you think about my ideas seriously.

    If I offer a suggestion, I appreacte honest feedback. But have reasons for it. When someone says "That's silly, it will never work" and then I say "Why?" and they say nothing, then I get mad.

  7. #37

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    Alex, you frequently suggest ideas that are generally impossible due to zoning laws.

    Please note that most criticism directed your way has more to do with blanket (and false) statements that you've made than it does with your many, many ideas about city planning.

  8. #38

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    If the average price of an apartment in all of Manhattan is $1.2M, certain zip codes within Manhattan must be WAY above that figure.

    NEW YORK, April 1 (Reuters) - The average sale price for a Manhattan apartment topped $1.2 million in the first quarter, a new record, as the supply of properties for sale shrunk, according to the Prudential Douglas Elliman Manhattan Market Overview.

    The average sale price rose to $1.21 million -- up 23 percent from the final quarter of 2004 and up 26 percent from a year ago.

    In the condominium sector, the average sale price jumped to $1.55 million -- exceeding $1.5 million for the first time -- and surging 34 percent from 2004's fourth quarter, the report said. The average condo sale price went up 22 percent from the year-ago first quarter.

    For Manhattan's entire apartment market, the average price per square foot climbed to $910 -- topping $900 a square foot for the first time. That's up 16.7 percent from the fourth quarter of 2004. It's a gain of 28 percent from a year earlier.

    "Improving economic conditions, a tight housing supply, rising incomes and the widely held expectation of rising mortgage rates in the near future, caused housing prices to surge this quarter," the report said.

    It was the first time the quarterly report included Manhattan markets above 116th Street on the West Side and above 96th Street on the East Side.

    The median sale price -- the point where half the sales are higher and half are lower -- climbed to $705,000. That's up 16.5 percent from the previous quarter and up 18.5 percent from a year ago.

    The volume of apartment sales fell to 2,028 units -- down 6.2 percent from the previous quarter and down 5.8 percent from a year ago, according to the report.

    Limited supply kept sales volume in check.

    The average sale price of a cooperative apartment, where an owner holds shares in the building and does not own the individual unit, rose to $988,746. That's up 15.5 percent from the previous quarter.

    The average co-op sale price went up average sale price of a cooperative apartment, where an owner holds shares in the building and does not own the individual unit, rose to $988,746. That's up 15.5 percent from the previous quarter.

    The average co-op sale price went up 25 percent from the first quarter of 2004.

    04/01/05 02:22 ET

    Copyright 2004 The Associated Press.

  9. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by alex ballard
    Ryan:

    I can take your critisims, as long as the return is you think about my ideas seriously.

    If I offer a suggestion, I appreacte honest feedback. But have reasons for it. When someone says "That's silly, it will never work" and then I say "Why?" and they say nothing, then I get mad.
    Alex, you often post quite extreme/unique ideas - when doing so, I think the burden of proving, and/or supporting your argument is on you, not on people who disagree with you. It's a negative way to ask a question - you're looking for people to disprove your theories in detail, when it is your responsibility to prove them.

    In other words, why should I put more effort into your idea than you do? I most often have criticized you for not supporting your ideas (then futilely repeatedly asking you to elaborate on your idea, or to support your arguments) instead of your ideas.

    If I said the sky is orange, is it your responsibility to disprove it in detail? No, you can simply say the sky is blue. If I am interested in convincing you that it is orange, it's on my shoulders to do so, no?

  10. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by ryan
    Alex, you often post quite extreme/unique ideas - when doing so, I think the burden of proving, and/or supporting your argument is on you, not on people who disagree with you. It's a negative way to ask a question - you're looking for people to disprove your theories in detail, when it is your responsibility to prove them.

    In other words, why should I put more effort into your idea than you do? I most often have criticized you for not supporting your ideas (then futilely repeatedly asking you to elaborate on your idea, or to support your arguments) instead of your ideas.

    If I said the sky is orange, is it your responsibility to disprove it in detail? No, you can simply say the sky is blue. If I am interested in convincing you that it is orange, it's on my shoulders to do so, no?
    I agree completely.

  11. #41
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    Alex, I have to admit I have to take a deep breath sometimes when replying to some of your posts in order to keep in mind your age and where you are coming from.

    You are very mature in your posts for the most part, but you have shown your true age in such comments as "If you don't like it go to China" and the like.


    One thing you might want to do when responding to a post, especially if it is an emotional one.

    Re-read what you are posting before you hit the submit button. Picture yourself sitting in a classroom, or with some friends sitting around talking and you come out and say something like what you have posted.

    Will you get looks of puzzlement and possibly outrage? Will you get some of them to think? Are YOU taking things personally and reacting rather than replying?

    We are all guilty of this at one time or another, but that does not make it the proper thing to do.

    Take advantage of the one thingthe internet offers over real-time live conversations: Time to reconsider what you are about to say before you say it.


    Also remember this, people like to answer questions. You just have to refrain from asking ones that you know are a little off (without maybe prefacing them a bit) or just plain silly ("Why don't we put in a roller coaster in Manhattan?"). You can get the same information from people by chosing your questions wisely and avoid all this BS about maturity and the like.


    that's about it.



    As for the topic? I am still burning about the fact that places like Corcoran can make so much money from the sale of these things. If average prices have gone up so much, and it has been a hot market, that would explain all the nice cars I see around the real estate offices.

  12. #42

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    Quote Originally Posted by ryan
    Alex, you often post quite extreme/unique ideas - when doing so, I think the burden of proving, and/or supporting your argument is on you, not on people who disagree with you. It's a negative way to ask a question - you're looking for people to disprove your theories in detail, when it is your responsibility to prove them.

    In other words, why should I put more effort into your idea than you do? I most often have criticized you for not supporting your ideas (then futilely repeatedly asking you to elaborate on your idea, or to support your arguments) instead of your ideas.

    If I said the sky is orange, is it your responsibility to disprove it in detail? No, you can simply say the sky is blue. If I am interested in convincing you that it is orange, it's on my shoulders to do so, no?








    Point taken, but now my admission:

    As you might have noticed, I have a very niave view on these issues. It's not that I'm not putting stock into these ideas, but I simply have no idea where to start.

    For example, Let's say I propose decking over the Coney Island rail yards and you say "no, that's not doable", well, if I knew it wasn't doable in the first place, would I have suggested it?

    See, I'm asking for reasons why it may or may not work so I can come out with better ideas. This back and forth is how I learn. If you give me a reason why it's not feasible (cost, for example), I may come back with a better solution or drop the idea althogether.

    If you'd like me to elaborate on my ideas, I will, BTW.








    Anyway, the "orange sky" example isn't exactly relevant. I am asking "Is the sky orange?". You say "No". I would like for you to say "No, it is Blue"

    By telling me that it is Blue, that is giving the reason why it being orange is not plausible. You simply say "it's not orange". Well, then it could be 6,000 other colors. By saying it's blue, you help me to identify the problem and therefore I either come back with something more plausible or drop the notion all together.

    I am throwing out an idea and I'm asking you to tell me why it may or may not work. In your scenario, you're saying I know why or why not and must prove it. I don't.

  13. #43

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    Perhaps you should do a bit more investigating into why your ideas may or may not work before you harangue people into explaining why or why not, Alex.

    I do understand that you learn from others' answers, but it's quite tiring to explain things to you over and over again. Particularly when you keep ignoring proven fact and returning to your imagined fiction of the way things are.

    If you expect constructive and educational conversation, it's your onus to keep up your end of the bargain, Alex.

  14. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by Schadenfrau
    Perhaps you should do a bit more investigating into why your ideas may or may not work before you harangue people into explaining why or why not, Alex.

    I do understand that you learn from others' answers, but it's quite tiring to explain things to you over and over again. Particularly when you keep ignoring proven fact and returning to your imagined fiction of the way things are.

    If you expect constructive and educational conversation, it's your onus to keep up your end of the bargain, Alex.
    I gotta agree here too.

  15. #45

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    What answers? Show me these "answers". Good luck finding them.

    Most of my teachers don't teach. Then people ask why American kids are stupid...DUH!!!

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