Page 4 of 4 FirstFirst 1234
Results 46 to 58 of 58

Thread: Forbes Most Expensive Zip Codes

  1. #46
    Banned Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Park Slope, Brooklyn, NY
    Posts
    8,113

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by alex ballard
    Point taken, but now my admission:

    As you might have noticed, I have a very niave view on these issues. It's not that I'm not putting stock into these ideas, but I simply have no idea where to start.

    For example, Let's say I propose decking over the Coney Island rail yards and you say "no, that's not doable", well, if I knew it wasn't doable in the first place, would I have suggested it?

    See, I'm asking for reasons why it may or may not work so I can come out with better ideas. This back and forth is how I learn. If you give me a reason why it's not feasible (cost, for example), I may come back with a better solution or drop the idea althogether.

    If you'd like me to elaborate on my ideas, I will, BTW.

    Anyway, the "orange sky" example isn't exactly relevant. I am asking "Is the sky orange?". You say "No". I would like for you to say "No, it is Blue"

    By telling me that it is Blue, that is giving the reason why it being orange is not plausible. You simply say "it's not orange". Well, then it could be 6,000 other colors. By saying it's blue, you help me to identify the problem and therefore I either come back with something more plausible or drop the notion all together.

    I am throwing out an idea and I'm asking you to tell me why it may or may not work. In your scenario, you're saying I know why or why not and must prove it. I don't.
    The more specific your questions, the more specific the answers will be. You can ask, "Is the sky orange?" - in which case, "No" is a reasonable answer. Or, you can ask, "Is the sky orange or another color?" - in which case "No" with a clarification would be reasonable.

    Theoretical thinking is great, but it also has to be critical. We can always ask, "why can't we do this or that?" But, critical thinking would have you also consider the "Why should we?", "How could we?", "Who would be interested?" etc. before posing the theory.

    There's a difference between declaring, "The best solution is to put a parking garage over the Coney Island Rail Yards" and saying, "I was wondering whether a parking garage over the Coney Island Rail Yards is feasible. Does anyone have an opinion or information on this?" Do you see the difference between authoritive / declarative statement of fact and the proposal of a question and / or possibility?

  2. #47
    Forum Veteran
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Brooklyn
    Posts
    1,278

    Default

    No one's criticizing anyone's interest in learning, but your method, as Schadenfrau said quite well. If you want more education than your school is giving you, that's great - go out and get it. Go to the library and read. Anyone who's educated and thoughtful reads on their own. That's the only way to become knowledgeable about a specific field of interest.

    Alex, specifically, if you feel naive about a subject - go read 10 books about it. I'm not kidding - the only way to speak authoritatively about a subject is to know much much more about it than you want to say. Think of an iceberg - the small portion above water is what you say, and the portion below is what you know.

    Your coney island railyards question? Try "I think the coney island railyards should be decked over with x, y & z because x, y & z. It would benefit x,y and z and only cost x,y & z." You'll get a much more interesting and civil response.

  3. #48

    Default

    Thank you, this has been helpful. I will take your advice and make a trip to the library. However, there is one little thing:

    I have Aspergers syndrome. I basically see the world way, way, WAY differently than you do. Sometimes, when I read stuff, I don't quite understand what is being said. Like when I was studying the stock market, I don't understand how a dividend works even after the thing telling me. Sometimes it seems a bit confusing.


    I've tried going onto zoning sites and understanding the lingo but it's hard to get. I have NO idea what a R-2 vs a R-3 is. Is there charts out there? How does this impact a building? Or those seismicity charts that have all this scientific wording in them and terms I don't get. It's a task to go to Google every 2 seconds to research a new word.



    What I'm saying is: Talking [or in this case, typing :P] helps me to break down information in a way I can better understand. It's not that I don't like researching or I'm too lazy to do it, but verbal and analogies help me alot too.


    How about if I go to some of these sites and post them here you can tell me what some stuff means. I'd be like I'd be doing the work with you guiding me?

  4. #49
    Forum Veteran
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Brooklyn
    Posts
    1,278

    Default

    Like I said before, I don't think the internet can take the place of real relationships.

  5. #50
    Chief Antagonist Ninjahedge's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Rutherford
    Posts
    12,781

    Default

    Seismicity charts are different for different reasons.

    All people are asking is that you come in and prepare your questions a bit so you get the answers you are looking for.

    Site a reference and some other information and I will be able to help you with seismic design in buildings, but just saying "I see charts" is a bit difficult to tag down exactly what you are asking.

    Asp explains a bit of the social bloopers, but one thing I know about it is that if it is mild, you CAN learn routines to get you around day to day.

    Just because certain behavior is not habitual or naturally learned does not mean you cannot learn some mental "training wheels" that will help you get where you want, and still make sense to you.


    Anyway, this has gone on long enough. Maybe we can get the discourse here pruned and transplanted into a seperate thread so we can get back to the topic...?

  6. #51

    Thumbs up

    This is nice of you guys to give advice to this chap. This is a damn good forum!

  7. #52
    Banned Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Park Slope, Brooklyn, NY
    Posts
    8,113

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by londonlawyer
    This is nice of you guys to give advice to this chap. This is a damn good forum!
    Here, Here - I'll second that!

  8. #53

    Default

    UPDATE.

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~

    And New York City's Most Expensive Zip Code Is....

    by Tom Acitelli
    1:46 pm


    Just north of the Financial District, ironically enough. According to a Forbes magazine analysis, the zip code 10013, which covers most of Tribeca (as well as some of Soho, Little Italy and Nolita) is the most expensive within New York City and the 14th most expensive nationwide

    http://www.observer.com/2008/real-es...nsive-zip-code

    © 2008 Observer Media Group

  9. #54

    Default

    Impressive that this dense neighborhood with nearly 300 sales is comparale to sprawling towns with only 12 sales.

  10. #55
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    NYC - Downtown
    Posts
    32,654

    Default

    That ^ is mainly because 10013 covers what was previously a non-residential area, so unlike other neighborhoods with some very high-income residents mixed in with long-term middle- and lower-income residents (i.e.: the Upper East Side) those who live in 10013 are to a far higher degree folks who bought into the neighborhood as the buildings there were transformed from manufacturing to mixed use / residential over the past 15 - 20 years (and with a great influx of new residents over the past 10 years).

  11. #56
    European Import KenNYC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Manhattan - BPC
    Posts
    774

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by lofter1 View Post
    I've lived in the heart of SoHo for 25 + years and there are many days when I long for "empty streets" rather than the hordes of shoppers, gawkers, cell-phone staring widewalk-blockers that fill the area now.

    Sure you had to walk 8 blocks to the food market, but that was small price to pay for quiet + solitude.
    Go west! We got room for you here in BPC, and you won't even have to walk 8 blocks to a food market!

    Plus who are all these certified artists (this is a zoning requirement for residential habitation in SoHo -- like it or not, it's the law even though it is never enforced) that can afford $1,000,000 - $5,000,000 to buy the luxury housing that continues to be built here? But maybe it's OK to flout the law as long as it increases the tax base for the city.
    Certified artists? really? How would that work? (apparently it doesnt, but in theory...)

  12. #57
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    NYC - Downtown
    Posts
    32,654

    Default

    I'm not in 10013 (that's the pink deco building on Canal / Church). My post office has been crammed into the back of what is now the Apple Store.

    btw: Artist Certification requirement worked just fine when rents were cheap and landlords were practically begging people to sign a lease in SoHo. Like I said back then there were few to no services nearby -- and BPC was still just a big sand box by the Hudson. Now there are a gazillion food options within a 30 second walk.

  13. #58
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    7,478

    Default

    The Most EXPENSIVE Zip Codes In New York

    Forbes has announced its list of America's Most Expensive Zip Codes and New York City has fourteen spots in the top 100. The neighborhoods are a range, from the usual suspects (West Village, TriBeCa, Upper East Side) to the surprises (like the East Village).

    GuestofaGuest's Billy Gray points out that the other boroughs fell far below Manhattan's rankings, with Brooklyn peaking at #276 with 11231, "which includes Red Hook and the regrettable BoCoCa acro-hood."


    #5 10014 West Village

    1 of 16 Next >>

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2010/0...3.html#s146358

Page 4 of 4 FirstFirst 1234

Similar Threads

  1. Where to buy contemporary furniture (not very expensive)
    By MrSpice in forum Questions and Answers about New York City
    Replies: 16
    Last Post: May 14th, 2008, 10:49 AM
  2. Where the Dogs Are: The Favorite ZIP Codes
    By Edward in forum New York City Guide For New Yorkers
    Replies: 19
    Last Post: December 13th, 2007, 05:32 PM
  3. Seismic Codes
    By alex ballard in forum New York City Guide For New Yorkers
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: May 27th, 2004, 02:33 PM
  4. America's 5 Most and Least Expensive Cities
    By GoogleJC in forum Anything Goes
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: April 8th, 2004, 02:50 AM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  


Google+ - Facebook - Twitter - Meetup

Edward's photos on Flickr - Wired New York on Flickr - In Queens - In Red Hook - Bryant Park - SQL Backup Software