Page 2 of 44 FirstFirst 12345612 ... LastLast
Results 16 to 30 of 649

Thread: New Mets Stadium (CitiField) - by HOK Sport

  1. #16

    Default

    The thread on the new Yankee Stadium has 172 posts. The one on the new Mets' Stadium has 15. Kind of interesting.

  2. #17
    Build the Tower Verre antinimby's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    in Limbo
    Posts
    8,976

    Default

    Well, you've got to figure the community resistance in the Bronx took up a few extra posts and add in the fact that the Yanks are more popular than the Mets and there you go.

  3. #18

    Default

    The Yankees thread is a year older and more information is known about their stadium project.

  4. #19

    Default

    It still isn't clear where the Mets are building.

    Originally, it was on the existing parking lots.

    Later, the junk yards along College Pt Blvd. The last I saw, they wated to take over fountains and soccer fields in Flushing Meadows Park.

  5. #20

    Default

    NYPOST:

    February 28, 2006 -- The Mets' future ballpark will have a cozier, more old-time look — with room for 11,900 fewer fans than Shea Stadium and a red-brick façade meant to evoke "historic Ebbets Field and Hell's Gate Bridge," new documents reveal.

    The triple-decker will hold 44,100 fans. Shea holds 56,000. With 42,500 seats, it will be standing room only for about 1,600 on sold-out days.

    No team member was at a hearing held yesterday in Flushing by the Empire State Development Corp., the state agency helping to finance the $600 million project — but the team has promised an official unveiling within weeks.

    The stadium is to go up in the parking lot beyond Shea's centerfield, and batters will face northeast. They now face east.

    There will be a glass-enclosed restaurant and lounge in left field for season-ticket holders and one for all fans on the upper level behind home. Also behind home will be a 360-degree rotunda, an homage to Ebbets Field.

    As for Shea, it will be razed to make way for parking. The Mets hope to begin construction this summer.

  6. #21

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Stern
    The stadium is to go up in the parking lot beyond Shea's centerfield, and batters will face northeast. They now face east.
    Is this so the setting sun won't blind batters? Ideally, it would have been nice if the outfield opened up to the Manhattan skyline, which is otherwise visible (somewhat) from Flushing Meadows Park.

  7. #22
    Build the Tower Verre antinimby's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    in Limbo
    Posts
    8,976

    Default

    The Mets need a new ballpark so much more desperately than the Yankees do. However, I don't believe in following the current trend of retro-nostalgia stadiums. Everyone's doing them and eventually when the next trend comes around, this stadium will once again look old quickly.

  8. #23

    Default

    I agree - mimicking past areans, like Ebbets, which has nothing to do with the Mets (but the Dodgers) makes no sense. If you want to integrate retro themes, how about making some reference to Shea stadium instead?

    In any case, I'm glad this project is going through.

  9. #24

    Default

    These are very exciting times for Mets fans - both a new stadium and a redevelopment of Willets Point. Putting two restaurants in the stadium (albeit one for season ticket holders only) adds a nice touch but I think there will be a lot of cafes, restaurants, and bars across 126th Street in Willets Point once the Iron Tringle is redeveloped. Hopefully this will entice more fans to hang out in the area before/after games. I'm not sure if we'll ever compare to Wrigleyville, but it can only get better than it is right now. As Tug McGraw would say, "Ya Gotta Believe!"

    The new stadium location should be a bit more convenient for fans taking the No. 7 since the main subway entrance would be located right behind home plate (instead of right field, as it is now).

  10. #25
    Forum Veteran
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    New York City
    Posts
    1,752

    Default

    The seat loss threw me a bit until I read this sort-of-related article in the Times:

    March 1, 2006

    Stanford Shrinking Football Stadium to Boost Ticket Sales

    By JONATHAN D. GLATER

    PALO ALTO, Calif. — The rationale behind Stanford University's $95 million project to shrink the campus football stadium is not intuitively obvious.

    But athletic department officials think it will help the university make more money.

    "It looks funny, but we hope to increase our income, twice at least," said Ray M. Purpur, senior associate athletic director at Stanford and a major fund-raiser for the project, which was begun almost immediately after Stanford played its last home football game in November. The project is to be completed for the fall season.

    The idea, Mr. Purpur explained, is that shrinking the supply of seats — to 50,000 from about 85,000 — will make people buy more season tickets. That way, they can be sure they can attend the games they want, like hugely popular rivalry games against the University of California.

    Consultants who advise sports teams say there is method to the Stanford plan. Reducing capacity can increase sales, said Marc Ganis, president of Sportscorp Ltd., a Chicago sports consulting firm.

    "When people feel like they wouldn't be able to get a ticket to any game they want to go to, they tend to get season tickets," he said, adding that it improves attendance over all.

    But at Stanford, the idea of spending more than $100 million to reduce the size of the 85-year-old stadium for the team's five or six home games drew the ire of Henry E. Riggs, a 1957 Stanford graduate and a former vice president for development at the university. The alumni magazine printed a letter from him criticizing the economics of the project and in an opinion article he wrote for The Palo Alto Weekly, he asked, "Is there no end to the foolish extravagance lavished on big-time college football?"

    Few graduates have joined Mr. Riggs in arguing against the project, which was originally budgeted for between $25 million and $85 million. One was Loren D. Smith, class of 1955, of Mountainside, N.J.

    "My interest in it was why," Mr. Smith said. "It's not as though it's falling apart."

    But other graduates said that the stadium was not comfortable, and that the field, separated from the stands by a running track, was too far away from spectators.

    "It definitely needed to be remodeled," said Dr. Robert O. Dillman, class of 1969, the medical director of the Hoag Cancer Center in Newport Beach, Calif. "I was just surprised that in doing it they were going to downsize it that much."

    The university has mounted Web cameras for Stanford football fans to monitor the renovation project (stanfordstadium.com). Construction work has proceeded for 16 hours a day, to make sure that the new stadium is ready in the fall.

    The project has also stirred little controversy on campus, students and faculty members said, perhaps because not many seem to attend the home football games.

    "I haven't heard any" discussion of the stadium, said Leah S. Sawyer, a junior on the school's track team. She said she had not heard the price tag attached to the renovation project, either. When told the amount, she said, "I can't imagine too many students would be excited" about spending that amount of money.

    But several faculty members said graduates who donate to athletics would not have given money to rebuild any other part of the university, and so there was no downside to spending so much on the stadium.

    "These people, their connection to the university is much more through athletics than through the academic" side, said Roger G. Noll, an economics professor at the university, referring to the graduates whose donations were financing the stadium project. He said he had heard few complaints from colleagues about the project, while he had heard concerns about the school's business endeavors, including real estate and intellectual property holdings.

    At least one other school, Dartmouth College in Hanover, N.H., is weighing a similar plan to reduce stadium size. But for Dartmouth and Stanford, the example of Princeton, which reduced the size of its stadium to 27,800 from 45,000 in the 1990's, may offer a cautionary tale.

    In the first seasons after the construction project in New Jersey, and after the price of a ticket was cut to $5, attendance soared, rising to more than 20,000 people a game from fewer than 10,000 a game in the old stadium, said Jerry Price, associate athletic director at the school.

    By last season, attendance had fallen nearly to its old levels, he said.

    "We had bad weather for a couple of games," he said.

    A few Stanford graduates said low attendance at games — about 36,000 people attended each game last season, on average — will not be cured by a renovation. Last year the team won five games and lost six, and that is the problem, they say.

    As Mr. Smith put it, "It's what's on the field that makes a difference."

  11. #26
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    NYC - Downtown
    Posts
    32,654

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by TonyO
    The seat loss threw me a bit until I read this sort-of-related article in the Times:

    ..."It looks funny, but we hope to increase our income, twice at least," said Ray M. Purpur, senior associate athletic director at Stanford and a major fund-raiser for the project...

    The idea, Mr. Purpur explained, is that shrinking the supply of seats — to 50,000 from about 85,000 — will make people buy more season tickets.
    Great for people with deep pockets .. sucks if you're one of those who only goes a few times a season.

  12. #27
    Jersey Patriot JCMAN320's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Jersey City
    Posts
    4,444

    Default

    Mets can picture this
    Unveil final rendering of new park



    BY ADAM RUBIN
    DAILY NEWS SPORTS WRITER

    Latest depiction of Mets' stadium, which is slated for 2009 and will include an Ebbets Field-like rotunda at its entrance.

    VERO BEACH, Fla. - The exterior will bring back memories of Ebbets Field. Capacity will be 45,000 spectators.
    And now there are pictures of the new Mets stadium, too. Page 39 of the Mets' new media guide includes the first glimpses of the final version of the state-of-the-art, open-air stadium, scheduled to open in 2009.

    Groundbreaking for the estimated $609 million project is planned for this summer in the parking lot behind Shea's outfield picnic area.

    "It kind of looks like Camden Yards," Mets infielder Chris Woodward said.

    Said outfielder Victor Diaz, who said the pictures reminded him of Cincinnati's new park: "It looks nice. I hope I'll be playing in it. The first year it opens it will give us good memories, and hopefully we can win a championship one year in the new ballpark."

    According to a plan submitted to the Empire State Development Corp., the exterior will be reddish-brown brick and limestone, with concrete arches and exposed steel included to resemble bridges. The stadium would open to provide a view of the northern end of Willets Point.

    A restaurant in left field, enclosed with glass, will be available for season-ticket holders, while a second restaurant will be located in the upper level behind home plate. Plans also call for the three-deck stadium to include suites behind home plate, below the main concourse.

    Among the other features touted by the Mets:

    Wider seats angled toward the infield, and more leg room.

    A main concourse that encircles the stadium.

    A rotunda at the entrance reminiscent of Ebbets Field, the home of the Brooklyn Dodgers.

    Shea Stadium is expected to be demolished after the new stadium's construction. It opened April 17, 1964, with the Pirates beating the Mets, 4-3. Only Fenway Park (1912), Wrigley Field (1914), Yankee Stadium (1923) and Dodger Stadium (1962) are older.

    Originally published on March 18, 2006
    Last edited by JCMAN320; March 18th, 2006 at 01:09 PM.

  13. #28

    Default

    Bigger image anyone?

  14. #29
    Build the Tower Verre antinimby's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    in Limbo
    Posts
    8,976

    Default

    "It kind of looks like Camden Yards," Mets infielder Chris Woodward said.

    Said outfielder Victor Diaz, who said the pictures reminded him of Cincinnati's new park: "It looks nice. I hope I'll be playing in it. The first year it opens it will give us good memories, and hopefully we can win a championship one year in the new ballpark."
    I know it's just a ballpark but it really is indicative of what this city has become. From being at the forefront of everything and a trendsetter, it is now a follower and of all places, Baltimore and Cincinnati! Not only that, but also well over a decade behind as well. Just amazing. Couldn't they come up with something more innovative than another cookie-cutter retro-themed ballpark?

  15. #30
    Build the Tower Verre antinimby's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    in Limbo
    Posts
    8,976

    Default

    and hopefully we can win a championship one year in the new ballpark."
    Such lofty aspirations. Instead of hoping for multiple championships, they'll settle for just one. Says so much about the organisation.

Page 2 of 44 FirstFirst 12345612 ... LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Randall's Island
    By billyblancoNYC in forum New York City Guide For New Yorkers
    Replies: 17
    Last Post: July 28th, 2015, 06:28 PM
  2. Javits Center Expansion (& Cancelled Jets Stadium)
    By OKoranjes in forum New York Skyscrapers and Architecture
    Replies: 2960
    Last Post: November 13th, 2013, 01:22 PM
  3. Beijing Olympic Stadium (the "Bird's Nest") - by Herzog & de Meuron
    By Kris in forum World Skyscrapers and Architecture
    Replies: 48
    Last Post: April 7th, 2009, 04:59 PM
  4. Bold Stadium Designs
    By Kris in forum World Skyscrapers and Architecture
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: April 24th, 2006, 01:58 PM
  5. Proposed Jets Stadium on West Side
    By NYguy in forum New York Skyscrapers and Architecture
    Replies: 245
    Last Post: March 6th, 2004, 08:15 PM

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  


Google+ - Facebook - Twitter - Meetup

Edward's photos on Flickr - Wired New York on Flickr - In Queens - In Red Hook - Bryant Park - SQL Backup Software