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  1. #31
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  2. #32
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    Dinky.


    Is This the East Village's Best Studio Apartment?

    August 6, 2010, by Joey













    Who says tiny East Village studios are only meant to be crash pads for post-collegiate NYC newbies? Not us, especially after seeing this remodeled version of a standard EVil studio in the portfolio of Brooklyn-based Jordan Parnass Digital Architecture. The Village Voice's Runnin' Scared blog calls it, "The Best Use of 500 Residential Sq. Ft. in the East Village, Period," Well, there's the whole rolling-out-of-bed-and-dying threat, but we dare someone to prove them wrong.

    Projects: East Village Studio [JPDA via Runnin' Scared]

    http://ny.curbed.com/archives/2010/0...rtment.php?o=1

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    East Village Advocates Urge City to Limit Building Heights

    Advocates and elected officials press for a rezoning plan that would limit building heights to 12 stories.


    The construction of NYU's 26-story dormitory building on 12th St. and Third Avenue drove local
    advocates to push for a rezoning of the area.


    By Patrick Hedlund

    EAST VILLAGE — The city needs to limit building heights on Third and Fourth avenues to stop the development of hotels and dorms in the low-rise area, a group of elected officials and local advocates told the City Planning Commission Wednesday.

    A half-dozen people spoke at a public hearing in favor of a proposed rezoning plan that would restrict building heights on the avenues between East 13th and Ninth streets in response to the recent influx of high-rise dorms and boutique hotels in the East Village.

    The rezoning proposal would cap building heights at 120 feet, or about 12 stories. It was introduced in part to prevent New York University from constructing more student housing in the area.

    “The current zoning is literally destroying the neighborhood,” said Elizabeth Finkelstein, director of preservation and research for the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation, a vocal watchdog of NYU’s development plans.

    The college currently has three high-rise residences in the area, including a 26-story dormitory on East 12th Street that even NYU officials acknowledge is out of scale.

    “Suddenly they were piercing our skyline,” said Community Board 3 district manager Susan Stetzer, noting that her office has been flooded with calls regarding high-rise development in that area.

    The plan would also provide incentives for building permanently affordable housing in the eight-block area, and would allow City Planning officials to restrict the size of new large office buildings, dormitories and other community facilities.

    More than 110 blocks in the East Village and Lower East Side were shielded from overbuilding by similar rezoning changes in late 2008.

    The proposal now awaits a decision from the City Planning Commission before it heads to the City Council for a vote.

    http://dnainfo.com/20100825/lower-ea...#ixzz0xlTIg3wI

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    Avenue B Has a Gated Community, And It's Selling!

    September 8, 2010, by Joey






    (click to enlarge)

    The East Village's Copper Building at 13th Street and Avenue B—not to be confused with the Far West Village's copper (little "c") building—has always been a bit standoffish with the neighbors. For example: It wiped Stuyvesant Town off the face of the earth. And as for the housing projects next door, the luxury building's way of dealing with those is to make buyers feel protected by sticking the lobby entrance behind a locked gate. Or at least that's how it looks to us. But don't worry, there' some balance to those menacing bars!

    There's a calming "Zen garden" to greet those granted passage beyond the gates (check it out in the gallery above), which looks pretty much like the one that was rendered back when construction was kicking off. The formerly gritty Avenue B now has a pair of luxury bookends in the Copper Building and the older One Avenue B down at Houston Street (the converted Christodora House is the meat in the foie gras sandwich), but is anyone buying up the Copper? Yep! Closings kicked off in August,and so far 8 sales have been recorded—three of which were over $1 million. Impressive, but imagine what those price tags could have been had the developers squeezed in a tennis court.

    Copper Building coverage [Curbed]
    The Copper Building at 215 Avenue B [StreetEasy]

    http://ny.curbed.com/archives/2010/0...lling.php#more

  5. #35
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    City Planning Approves Building Height Limits in the East and West Villages

    The City Planning Commission voted to rezone two portions of the East and West Villages facing overdevelopment.

    By Patrick Hedlund


    T
    he East Village's traditionally low- and mid-rise buildings, shown here along the west side of Fourth
    Avenue looking south from 12th Street. (DNAinfo/Patrick Hedlund)


    MANHATTAN — The City Planning Commission unanimously approved two rezoning plans Tuesday to limit building heights in the East and West Villages.

    The first rezoning covers eight blocks along Third and Fourth avenues in the East Village, between East 13th and East 9th streets, and will cap building heights at about 12 stories.

    Advocates and elected officials in the neighborhood pressed for the rezoning because of the recent influx of high-rise dormitories and boutique hotels in the area.


    A diagram put out by local preservationists
    showed properties in the West Village
    threatened by future development.
    (Greenwich Village Society For Historic Preservation
    )

    "The Third Avenue Corridor rezoning proposal follows in the spirit of the [110-block] East Village and Lower East Side Rezoning," said City Planning Commissioner Amanda Burden, "helping to extend the continued protections of this vibrant area's neighborhood character while also promoting the very strong local and citywide need for affordable housing."

    The plan provides incentives for building permanently affordable housing in the designated area, and allows City Planning to restrict the size of new large office buildings, dormitories and other community facilities.

    The West Village rezoning encompasses six blocks along Washington and Greenwich streets, roughly from West 12th to West 10th streets, and will limit building heights to about eight stories.

    Preservationists and elected officials pushing for the designation had previously worried about a flood of new condo and commercial high-rise buildings in the former manufacturing area due to its half-century-old zoning regulations.

    Burden said the relatively small rezoning will "make a big difference in protecting the character and scale of this neighborhood," noting that it "will ensure that the historic building stock along these streets is protected and that the residential community is no longer threatened by out-of- character commercial development."

    The rezoning plans now await a final vote from the City Council.

    http://dnainfo.com/20100929/manhatta...#ixzz116RvcGrJ

  6. #36

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    ^
    This is an idiotic idea. We need more housing, there isn't anywhere to go but up, and the village idiots don't want to recognize that they live in a high density city. Then they bitch when the apartments are too expensive, because the developers can't build enought to put a dent in demand.

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    Meanwhile, on Extra Place: Forget Paris

    October 25, 2010, by Joey Arak



    In his review of hip new restaurant Peels this week, New York critic Adam Platt says the Bowery is "fast becoming lower Manhattan’s answer to the Champs-Élysées." But lower Manhattan's answer to the Left Bank, Extra Place, is not quite living up to expectations. The former semi-secret alley behind the Bowery was branded as such by developer AvalonBay, which hoped to turn Extra Place into a thriving pedestrian mall catering to the residents of the company's new Bowery luxury buildings. Almost four years later, EV Grieve checked out the scene, and, well, Sacre bleu!

    Extra Place has become a recycling center [EV Grieve]
    Extra Place coverage [Curbed]

    http://ny.curbed.com/archives/2010/1...rget_paris.php

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    Musty Old, Clever Young East Seventh Street

    By CHRISTIAN L. WRIGHT





    IF you walk along East Seventh Street in the East Village, you’re likely to hear Polish, Russian, Spanish, Ukrainian, German, maybe some Yiddish, and even English spoken in an array of regional accents. But the six-block stretch from Cooper Square to Avenue D is also like a college town, full of creatively dressed young people, many of them art students. Competing allegiances — urban renewal versus civic pride, bohemian protest versus entrepreneurial spirit — manage to live peacefully on a small campus.

    On a recent morning, the scene at Abraço espresso bar was a perfect illustration: A lanky Italian with one leg of his corduroys tucked into an argyle sock leaned against a tall, skinny wooden table on the sidewalk, sipping from a demitasse and reading The Financial Times. Inside, a rumpled young man lingered in the open window, wearing homesickness for Brazil on his comely face. At his elbow, a middle-aged woman in matte red lipstick and a hand-knit snood was eyeing the cured olive cookies and chatting about the charms of her East Village neighborhood.

    Behind the small counter, one of the proprietors, Jamie McCormick, worked his La Marzocco machine and called greetings to his regulars. “Where you been?” Mr. McCormick said to a reedy young man in a motorcycle jacket with a striped scarf tossed loosely around his neck. “You been on tour?”

    East Seventh Street is a tree-lined corridor where ideas flourish, cultures coexist, a lot of people pass through and some never leave. There are rent-stabilized walk-ups with bathtubs in the kitchen, and there are million-dollar condos with roof decks whose views skim the cityscape.

    There are independent shops, like Tokio 7 (83 East Seventh), the high-thrift store where labels like Marni, Balenciaga and Yohji Yamamoto are sold on consignment. Then there are the old denizens who display their life’s work — a model of a wooden boat, say, built in 1965 — in a dusty window at street level and live in the back.

    There is food, and lots of it, from the pioneering Greek restaurant Pylos (No. 128) to Luke’s Lobster (No. 93), opened about a year ago by a wholesomely handsome fisherman’s son from Maine who quit a career in finance to start a family business. Luke’s is a tiny counter-service place that makes a $14 lobster roll that’s very competitive, in price and taste, with others around town. It’s always spilling over with a nice mix of recent graduates, art school toilers, Japanese tourists and the occasional New Dad picking up takeout.

    Sara Jenkins, the gastro-star behind the six-stool Porchetta (No. 110), where you can get a hearty plate of meat, greens and white beans for $14, just opened her second place on Seventh Street. That would be Porsena, a proper 60-seat restaurant with expensive tile, arched interiors and an Italian menu, just a couple of blocks away.

    “It was a nice little space with a nice little rent,” said Ms. Jenkins one recent Friday afternoon, sitting with her laptop at the wooden chef’s table in the new space. “I’m comfortable in the East Village. It’s a delicate balance between gentrification and losing it all — Seventh Street has managed the line.”

    East Seventh is anchored at the western end by 41 Cooper Square, the great steel and concrete landmark that the architect Thom Mayne designed for the Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art. Mr. Mayne has described the building as a “vertical piazza, the central space for informal social, intellectual and creative exchange.”

    There’s a gallery in the lower level that’s open to the public (just say hello to the guard at the security desk) and on Tuesdays, free tours are given of the building, its labs, studios, grand staircase and vantage onto the dome of the Ukrainian church next door.

    On the second floor, there’s a many-windowed classroom that hovers at tree level above Seventh, with a fantastic view of the Young Turks with loosened neckties getting carded at the door of the historic saloon McSorley’s, whose legend is painted on the front: “We were here before you were born.”

    Near the eastern end of this stretch is Tompkins Square Park, that wonderful 10.5-acre patch that continues to lure the bohemian legions yet resists gentrification against all odds. Originally planned as a farmers’ market, it has been used as a public park since the 1800s and has weathered many seasons since. On any given day, there might be a band making noise, codgers playing chess, schoolchildren all in a line, and a Police Department van slowly cruising through. The echoes of demonstrators yelling “Die, Yuppie Scum” may be very faint these days, but there is no Shake Shack ... yet.

    Along the way are some undiscovered gems and community stalwarts, the Graffiti Church not least among them. At 205 East Seventh, an old synagogue, the church runs a soup kitchen, an after-school program, a computer lab and English classes, in addition to traditional church services. (There are at least six churches along the six-block stretch.)

    Behind a gate at No. 251, a private house sits back from the street, with a flagstone garden in front, looking as if it had been plucked straight from Charleston, S.C., or maybe Toulouse, France.

    Meanwhile, the Sam and Sadie Koenig garden at No. 237 is open to all, and is presided over by a sculpture of a little girl donated by the artist Kiki Smith, who lives in one of the circa-1900 town houses sitting in a lovely pastel row on the south side of Seventh.

    Almost at the eastern end, about half a block from the big housing project on Avenue D, the Flowerbox building (No. 259), completed in 2008, has changed the tenor of that part of the street. It has a glass and steel facade festooned with hanging plants in flower boxes, but somehow still manages to be discreet.

    On the fourth floor, a six-room three-bath condominium with approximately 2,500 square feet of space is on the market for $3.195 million. The apartment has 12-foot ceilings and enormous windows that open onto the street side and at the back overlook two community gardens on Eighth Street, the Green Oasis and Gilbert’s Garden.

    Yonatan Israel, a filmmaker from Paris who owns Colson Patisserie in Park Slope, bought a 3,864-square-foot red brick town house on Seventh Street for $2.5 million in 2005. “We used to live on Eighth Street between C and D,” he said. “I wasn’t looking, but it was a beautiful place, more charming, and Seventh Street is different, it’s a nicer street.”

    He and his family renovated the house with the architect Galia Solomonoff, who designed Dia: Beacon; they preserved original wood and detail, and added a teak-and-glass extension on the back. “It’s probably one of the quietest in the city,” Mr. Israel said of East Seventh Street. “But it’s not like it’s a bubble. We’re definitely gentrifiers, but there’s still diversity.”

    http://www.nytimes.com/2010/12/05/re...lock.html?_r=1

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    Mars Bar Will Close (Temporarily!) to Make Way for New Apartments

    December 7, 2010, by Joey Arak


    [Photo via PropertyShark.]

    People who think the old East Village is dead probably love the strip of ragged low-rise buildings on the west side of Second Avenue between Houston and 1st Streets, home to legendary dive Mars Bar, the building with the spray-painted 7 1/2 address and other neighborhood icons. This block has remained immune to gentrification, but it looks like some vaccine appointments got missed this year! The Local East Village reports that BFC Partners, builders of luxury condos like Noho's 48 Bond and Downtown Brooklyn's Toren, plans to renovate part of the row and add new market-rate housing. This will cause the temporary closure of Mars Bar and its neighboring businesses. Mars Bar's owner is cool with that. Deep breaths, everyone.

    BFC will head to Community Board 3 tomorrow night with its plans for 9 Second Avenue and 11-17 Second Avenue. According to the LEV, the plan is to combine the structures and build a new addition, perhaps bringing the height all the way up to 12 stories (though wouldn't demolition make more sense given the condition of the buildings?).

    That's allowed under zoning because the developer will get bonuses for including affordable housing, which in this case will be 12 apartments (compared to 48 market-rate units). There are 9 low-income families currently in the buildings, so they'll get first dibs on the apartments, which could be sold to them for $1 each. East Village affordable housing: cheaper than a cup of coffee!

    There's a bit of debate over the number of low-income apartments, but the project has the vocal support of the tenants and the businesses, even if they'll have to relocate/close during the two years of construction. Mars Bar owner Hank Penza says he'll wind up with a space three or four times the size of the current bar. Oh, he also said this: "They won't choke me. I didn't get off the boat yesterday with a pound of spaghetti in my hand." Famous last words? We'll have to wait and see. The approval process for this whole kit and caboodle still has a long way to go.


    [9 Second Avenue at center. Photo via Google Street View.]

    Plan Would Add Low Income Housing [The Local East Village]

    http://ny.curbed.com/archives/2010/1...ments.php#more

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    Looks much better with a cornice and the new windows .


    New Look for East Village's Most Controversial Mansion

    January 5, 2011, by Joey Arak



    Three years ago 47 East 3rd Street was ground zero for the New York City rent wars, as a wealthy family fought a bitter battle to clear out the 15-unit tenement in order to turn the building into a huge single-family house. There were flyers, protests, and in the end, buyouts, and the Economakis family finally got their wish.

    Cut to today: How's the building looking? Like it recently got a cornice and new windows! Our roving photog Will Femia dropped by 47 East 3rd Street, but there's not much else to see. Renovations are ongoing, and a recent disapproved building permit calls for a new curb cut. Maybe the old storefronts are being eyed for a private garage? After the jump, a shot of the building as it looked in 2005, via the PropertyShark archives.



    47 East 3rd Street coverage [Curbed]

    http://ny.curbed.com/archives/2011/0...al_mansion.php

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    Guggenheim to Convert Rat-Infested East Village Lot Into Community Space

    The museum is proposing to build a temporary community space in a rat-ridden

    By Patrick Hedlund









    EAST VILLAGE — A derelict lot on East 1st Street that has become a haven for rats will be transformed into a temporary community space under a plan proposed by the Guggenheim Museum.

    The vacant lot at 33 East First St., between First and Second avenues, has long been a source of frustration among neighbors on the block who have worked for years to bring some type of arts programming to the rodent-ridden eyesore.

    Now, the Guggenheim is floating a plan to build a two-level structure there in late 2011 that would act as a short-term community center, gathering space and think-tank before moving to other major international cities, representatives from the museum told Community Board 3 Thursday.

    The structure — which would include a second-story "toolbox" level hovering above an open ground-floor space — is "first and foremost really about people," said David van der Leer, assistant curator for architecture and urban studies at the Guggenheim.

    He explained that the public pop-up center could host everything from workshops and lectures to cooking demonstrations and art classes, using local community input to shape the programming.

    The city-owned lot also connects to the under-renovation "strolling" park space along Houston Street that would contain even more features, including a café and public bathrooms, and visitors would have access to the space from both East 1st Street and Second Avenue, representatives said.

    The project, which could begin preliminary construction as early as April, would open in August and last through mid-October before heading to a city in Europe and finally Asia. It would be open to the public five days a week, from Wednesday to Sunday, from about noon to 9 p.m. on weekdays and 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. on weekends, representatives said.

    "It sounds like a great project," said a member of Board 3's parks committee, which unanimously voted to approve the project. "The problem is that it's going to leave."

    The neighbors who have been working with the city to run the rodents out of the lot, which is an active "rat warren" due to the unstable ground there, lauded the plan and what it would mean for the future of the site.

    "I really can't emphasize how bad it is now," said Robert Graff, president of the East First Street Block Association, who has helped organize fundraisers with other neighbors on the block to establish cultural space on the property.

    He explained that the rat problem is so bad that the television network Animal Planet even came to the lot recently to film a special on the rodents.

    "It's an embarrassing condition," Graff added. "It's unhealthy."

    Aside from its community benefits, the Guggenheim project would also finance the excavation and resurfacing of the lot, addressing the rodent issue while preparing the site for future use as community space.

    An architect and neighbor who has been involved with the local planning effort requested that the Guggenheim leave whatever site features it can behind — like a foundation or "cleat" — for use in any future projects on the lot.

    "I think this could be really exciting. It will really fast-track our plans," said Ann Shostrom, an artist who's lived in the co-op building next to the rundown lot since 1986 and has helped spearhead community efforts to refurbish the site. "It's been an intractable problem for so long."

    The project, which is a collaboration between the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum and car manufacturer BMW, will use a Tokyo-based architecture firm to design the structure and represents a broader exercise in urban planning, van der Leer said.

    But for residents in the area, the project simply marks a huge step forward in confronting the critters that have run roughshod over their block.

    "You can smell it coming up the street," Graff said.

    http://www.dnainfo.com/20110114/lowe...#ixzz1B3u6YUuM

  12. #42
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    Not development, but someone's (too) precious real estate .


    The Hells Angels unveil new line of defense for their bench

    Back in June 2009 we pointed out the sign on the bench outside the Hells Angels headquarters on Third Street ...



    This was an effort to thwart clueless hotel guests from the Sanctuary Guest Suites next door for plopping down here ... However, this reporter still saw European thrillseekers taking a seat here...

    So now! It's a little more difficult...




    http://evgrieve.com/2011/02/hells-an...f-defense.html

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    City Orders Removal of Hells Angels Bench Barricade

    The motorcycle club placed a guard atop a bench outside its E. 3rd Street building to keep people from sitting there.

    By Patrick Hedlund



    EAST VILLAGE — The city is standing up to the Hells Angels by reportedly ordering the notorious motorcycle club to remove a barricade from atop a bench outside its East 3rd Street clubhouse installed to prevent passersby from claiming a seat.

    The club placed a plastic bar over the bench to keep non-members from planting themselves on the group's turf, but the Department of Transportation recently ruled that the seating is on public property and would require a permit for the guard, the New York Post reported.

    "We are living in a city right now where every street and every major thoroughfare is so heavily pockmarked with potholes that major intersections look like they've been subject to shelling in Afghanistan," said noted civil-rights attorney Ron Kuby, lawyer for the Hells Angels. "And the DOT seems worried about a park bench that nobody is complaining about."

    The bench blocker appeared after the club attached a sign to the structure warning people not to sit on it because it was private property.

    The guard was installed because guests from a hotel located next door to the clubhouse continued to treat the seating as their own.

    No one answered the door at the East 3rd Street property on Monday.

    "The irony is that the reason the city cracks down on benches is because they attract homeless people and people loitering," Kuby said, adding that DOT officials told him at least a dozen other pieces of street furniture on the block were also in violation.

    "I pointed out that the bar there exists to prevent people from loitering. So that's why you're cracking down, because the Hells Angels are preventing trespassers from hanging out on the street?" Kuby said.

    A DOT spokesman said that the agency is currently working on an alternative for the club, but did not immediately say whether the barricade would be allowed to return.

    The infamous biker club, which has dozens of charters across the globe, has been at the East 3rd Street location since 1969.

    http://www.dnainfo.com/20110228/lowe...#ixzz1FLD7GZ00

  14. #44

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    NY REAL ESTATE COMMERCIAL

    FEBRUARY 28, 2011

    Developers Eye City Office Buildings


    BY DANA RUBINSTEIN

    Edward Minskoff, a member of one of New York's storied real-estate families, is hoping to begin construction in July on what would be the city's first large "speculative" new office building since the collapse of Lehman Brothers in 2008.

    Mr. Minskoff says he will begin construction without any pre-leasing on a Maki and Associates-designed, 430,000-square-foot tower on a site overlooking Astor Place that he acquired in late 2007. Just outside the trendy East Village, it's an unorthodox location for an office building.

    Most of the city's modern office space is in Midtown and the Financial District.

    http://online.wsj.com/article/SB1000...737840000.html

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    ^ see the 51 Astor Place thread for the full story.

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