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Thread: New York City Maps

  1. #46
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
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    New Yorkers Use Interesting Words When Dating Online

    By Garth Johnston


    A map detail.

    If there is one thing we love, it's a good map of New York. So naturally we're loving the dating maps that artist R. Luke DuBois has up right now. Using data from online dating profiles DuBois has put together national and local maps that show how people represent themselves online. And the New York City map, which he made by sifting through 5 million words from 413,872 singles and then breaking them down by zip code, has some seriously fun results.

    One of the more interesting facts that comes to light scanning the maps is that, as DuBois tells Fast Company, "very few singles profiles are boilerplate. Everyone has a unique way of writing, or as specific activity they write about, or restaurants, or trips they've taken." But the words that match up with the zip codes are pretty amusingly accurate in some cases.

    Some of our favorite neighborhood descriptions include Breezy Point (Sexist), Dumbo (Graphic, Glamour, Dick), Far Rockaway (Unyielding), Murray Hill (Debutante, Fund), Roosevelt Island (Escape) and SoHo (Cowardice, Gentrification). What words on the map stand out to you?

    http://gothamist.com/2011/04/05/new_...ing_word_c.php

  2. #47
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    Mapping the Cityscape

    By Cheryl Yau

    The Commissioners’ Plan of 1811 was a visionary approach that reshaped New York’s underlying structure, separating Manhattan from the old organic cities, while still defining it today. To acknowledge the success of the grid model made possible by John Randel, Jr., and celebrate its 200th anniversary this year, The Center for Architecture opened an exhibition, Mapping the Cityscape, on July 6, exploring the ways in which mapping influences our perception of the environment. The exhibition includes maps ranging from 1609 to present day interpretations, taking into account the technological advances and methodologies that are shaping our urban landscape.



    Spanning across the walls at this exhibition are a wide range of cartographic representations, including ecological, cultural, planning, civil data, location-based, user-generated, Google and Tauranac transportation maps. These maps, saturated with different colors, shades, aerial photographs and line drawings, illustrate ways in which the city is used and understood. In the narrow corridor of space that the Center was able to dedicate to the exhibition, one side displays floor to ceiling oversized strips of vinyl prints plastered side by side, while the opposite facing wall is tiled with square croppings of maps and captions mounted onto foam board to mimic the grid pattern. It was difficult to figure out the transition and relationship between each juxtaposition while navigating the corridor, and even harder to compare the maps due to an inconsistent scale. The typography in each caption was too heavy in weight to read comfortably and lacked hierarchy overall, while most of the legends were reduced to minuscule proportions and tacked onto the bottom of each vertical strip below eye level, as though the information was not integral to understanding the maps.

    While Mapping the Cityscape was designed to celebrate the grid, the exhibition itself is neither deeply informative nor aesthetically stimulating. Cartography is a complex discipline that combines science, technology and information design, and the works that result from this study need to be curated and displayed in a much more sophisticated manner. Given the small exhibition space and emphasis on contemporary technological advances, an interactive representation or time-based projection showing an overlay of each map, would have been a more appropriate and space-efficient opportunity to compare the varying interpretations of the cityscape.



    While Randel’s grid design has proved itself in the last 200 years to be a successful model for urban planning—one that makes Manhattan so easily walkable and inhabitable—the exhibition needs clear, informative graphic design to highlight this effective and strong foundation for the city. The Center for Architecture’s tribute to the grid is merely an overview, an insufficient representation with poor execution. Manhattan’s grid is accessible and easily understood by locals and visitors alike, while the exhibition dedicated to it was anything but. If Mapping the Cityscape aims to encourage design professionals to engage and rethink ways to look at their surrounding urban landscape, it fails, because all it really prompts are thoughts on how to redesign the exhibition for better presentation.

    http://www.metropolismag.com/pov/201...-the-cityscape

  3. #48
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
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    Super Mario map of NYC:

    http://jesseeisemann.com/MarioNYC.html

  4. #49
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
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    Click link to see interactive map.


    Hidden in Plain Sight: NYC Architecture Right Under Your Nose


    by Kelsey Keith



    We all know the major architectural landmarks of New York City—but every day, we pass by big-name architects' lesser-known works and other buildings somehow missing from the guidebooks. Here now, a guide to NYC's under-the-radar architecture in plain sight. The map of 24 sites is designed as a walking tour, so they're in Gramercy and points south.

    http://ny.curbed.com/archives/2011/1...e.php#pointmap

  5. #50
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    They could have at least tried to put the arrows remotely near one of the places they were talking about

  6. #51
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    Extending the Manhattan grid .

    I'm at about 3,213th Street and 74,116th Avenue!

    http://extendny.com/

  7. #52
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    NYC Street Closure Map

    MAYOR BLOOMBERG AND SPEAKER QUINN LAUNCH ONLINE ‘NYC STREET CLOSURES’ MAP

    Interactive Online Tool Maps Street Closures Due to Road Work and Special Events

    January 10, 2012

    Future Enhancements to Include Parking Regulations and More

    Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg and City Council Speaker Christine Quinn today launched NYC Street Closures, the City’s new online mapping application for displaying street closure information across the five boroughs. The tool provides details about current and planned full street closures obstructing normal vehicular traffic due to road work, street fairs, block parties, special events or parades, and allows users to conduct searches based on date, time, and location.


  8. #53
    Chief Antagonist Ninjahedge's Avatar
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    We all know how on-schedule these closures are... right?



    Honestly though, this is a great idea. Hopefully they will use a readily accessed database for it so our navigation tools can incorporate the information when they are plotting our paths.....

  9. #54

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    Quote Originally Posted by GordonGecko View Post
    They could have at least tried to put the arrows remotely near one of the places they were talking about
    I just thought about exactly the same.

  10. #55
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    Remembering New York City's Losses Via Interactive Maps

    by Sara Polsky



    Here's an interesting new NYC mapping project: Sites of Memory, a site created by art director and writer Angela Riechers. The project "reattaches memories of the dead to locations in New York City…linking separate urban sites together into a larger story about remembrance, mortality and forgetting." Sounds grim, but in a fascinating way. There are audio tours focusing on events like the Civil War Draft Riots and the sinking of the steamship General Slocum, NYC's largest single-day loss of life prior to 9/11. Click through to explore the first set of maps. Next up: an option for the site's users to upload their own memorials.

    Official website: Sites of Memory [sitesofmemory.com]

    http://ny.curbed.com/archives/2012/0...ctive_maps.php

  11. #56
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    Welcome to 1940s Greenwich Village

    by Dana

    GVSHP recently came across a great website called 1940s New York. In 1943, four local newspapers published a New York City Market Analysis, which provided hundreds of photos & color-coded maps, statistics, and short narratives about neighborhoods across the city, all based on the 1940 census. According to the site, “The Center for Urban Research at the CUNY Graduate Center is making the 1943 profiles available to provide context for the 1940 Census records and to offer a research aid to historians and anyone else interested in learning more about New York from the 1940s.” Of course, the first thing we did was scroll right down to the Village!


    1940s New York

    According to the 1943 profile of the Greenwich Village area:

    Greenwich Village is not a neighborhood of artists and writers, although many of them still live in its old brick and brownstone houses. Remodeling has changed many of the Bohemian haunts MacDougal Alley and Washington Mews. Prosperity blooms along Fifth Avenue north of Washington Square. Business couples like this neighborhood. There are many “shared apartments” and rooming houses close to the park. It is a market of many contrasts, with overflowing Italian tenements and the most expensive type of modern hotels and apartment houses. The Washington Square College of New York University is located in this district. From 12th Street and Greenwich Avenue west to Miller Highway, we find the Gansevoort and West Washington markets- a wholesale meat, vegetable, and egg center. Thousands of visitors, arriving by the Holland Tunnel, get their first glimpse of New York in this district.

    This very interesting description is accompanied by monetary and demographic statistics which can be viewed on the site. The monthly rent of a Greenwich Village apartment averaged around $40. Ironic when compared to today’s prices, this was near the bottom of the rental market. The more expensive properties, between $50-$100, were clustered around the park and on 5th Avenue.


    close up of the Village districts

    The East Village/Lower East Side, in contrast, had almost no areas above the very lowest price bracket of “under $30.” The description classified it as:

    Visitors to New York find the Lower East Side an amazing show. There is nothing comparable in America. But its importance as a market is due entirely to numbers and not to individual family purchasing power. It is the most populous, most crowded, most old-world district in New York City. Its more than 100,000 foreign-born population gives the Lower East Side a tinge that is essentially alien. But the district is changing. It has lost more than 40,000 foreign-born since the previous Census. Total population has dropped 225,000 in 20 years. Slum clearance has added many parks and playgrounds. Big housing developments, like Knickerbocker Village, have appeared. The pushcart markets, Chinatown, the Bowery, barber colleges, tattoo shops, flop houses, second-hand clothes exchanges provide color and atmosphere seldom encountered in the American scene.

    There is so much more of this colorful history on the 1940s website. Look up your own neighborhood and see what it was like 70 years ago!

    http://gvshp.org/blog/2012/07/30/wel...nwich-village/

  12. #57
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    And look at SoHo, where it was a basically a wasteland and prices were "unknown"

    Thanks for posting. It's a great resource.

  13. #58
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    Manhattan Street Map by FLATCUT_ Ties Together Experiments In Motion

    by Chris Bentley


    The model of Manhattan’s street grid floats above visitors, offering a new perspective on the city. (Collin Erickson)

    Audi and GSAPP teamed with FLATCUT_ to create a 1:1500 scale model of Manhattan’s street grid from 3/16-inch-thick aluminum sheets

    This September at the preview of the Lowline Park in Manhattan’s Lower East Side, visitors had the opportunity to absorb nine visions by students from Columbia University Graduate School of Architecture Planning and Preservation (GSAPP) about the future of urban living and mobility. Conducted as the culmination of a yearlong research program in partnership with Audi of America, the exhibition, Experiments in Motion, was tied together and contextualized by a hanging, 50-foot-long, 1:1500 scale model of Manhattan’s street grid. Audi and GSAPP called on New York and New Jersey-based fabrication studio FLATCUT_ to create the model, which also calls out every subway station on the island. The job required the studio to pull off a high wire balancing act: the fabrication of an object both intricate and sturdy, modular yet monolithic.


    Light emanating from the exhibit’s displays plays upon the surface of the model. (Collin Erickson)

    The Manhattan street grid had to float amid a sea of colorful projectionsemanating from the student’s exhibits, which were presented in digital format. Light from the screens had to be able to dance across the model. Equally important to the exhibit, the model had to cast a heavy shadow, silhouetting the street grid upon the digital displays and placing them in context. “That was pretty unique,” said FLATCUT_’s Tomer Ben-Gal. “The model had to be both reflective and have the ability to cast a shadow.” In close collaboration with the Therrien-Barley design team, FLATCUT_ studied several materials to find the right one to render the complex line work of Manhattan’s street grid. “It was critical that we identify an alloy that was both strong enough to hold the piece up, but not too thick that it would become difficult to cut the fine pattern they were looking to achieve,” added FLATCUT_’s Daniel Ramirez. FLATCUT_ decided on 3/16-inch aluminum sheets. The studio revised the detail of the design team’s line drawings in Rhino, refining the grid so it could be cut using a water jet cutter. They also broke the overall model down into modular parts that could fit through the CNC cutting machine. After consulting with the designers on a variety of reflective finishes, the team decided to leave the raw look of the aluminum’s mill finish.


    The model cast the silhouette of the Manhattan street grid upon the ground and any who cared to pass beneath it. (Collin Erickson)

    Once cut, the modular pieces of the model were welded together in FLATCUT_’s New Jersey fabrication shop with flanges, creating a smooth, unbroken appearance to the finished product. Once assembled, Art Domantay hoisted the unit in place with aircraft cables connected to the flanges. FLATCUT_’s attention to detail throughout the process is evident in just how seamlessly their ghostly Manhattan melded with the digital projections that comprise the rest of the exhibit. “It was interesting,” Ramirez said, “to apply our skills as fabricators of physical pieces to digital interactions.”

    http://blog.archpaper.com/wordpress/archives/51624

  14. #59
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
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    Very colourful.


    Paula Scher's Mind-Bending New York City Maps And Murals

    by Hana R. Alberts






    Paula Scher—a veritable guru in the fields of design, branding, and art who was just named a National Design Award winner—has a long roster of A-list clients. From the High Line and the Public Theater to Bloomberg's headquarters and the Parks department, her logos and graphics, defined by bold typography, adorn New York City's creative, public, and corporate spheres.

    A principal at design consultancy Pentagram, Scher has a miles-long resume with one project, in particular, that we love: her 2010 work on the atrium of the Queens Metropolitan Campus in Forest Hills, a space shared by two schools. In it, she plastered one of her beautiful, detailed, signature typographical maps all over the walls, giving students a sense of place via unconventional means. Peruse the photo gallery for a room that, from virtually every angle, offers a new perspective on the geography of the city.

    Scher used to do her branding and design work by day, relegating her painting—representations of maps that are packed with little words and phrases related to the location—to a hobby. But then, at the Queens Metropolitan Campus, she was able to marry the two, blowing up a map she had made of the five boroughs to a larger-than-life size and zooming in on the students' home borough. "I started doing them [the maps] 20 years ago. I used to make them small, and I was doing them more as illustrations," Scher said. "I suddenly realized they'd be better big. They have a life of their own; there is no rhyme or reason. New York is totally inspiring to me."

    Keep an eye out for Scher's latest work at Coney Island, Brighton Beach, the Rockaways, and on Staten Island's shores this summer. Why? She designed the new signage system that directs visitors to and around these rebuilt beaches, which suffered severe damage at the hand of Hurricane Sandy.

    New Work: Queens Metropolitan Campus [Pentagram]
    Bio: Paula Scher [Pentagram]
    Paula Scher's projects [Behance]
    Paula Scher Maps [official]
    Cooper-Hewitt, National Design Museum Announces 2013 National Design Awards Winners [Bustler]

    http://ny.curbed.com/archives/2013/0...and_murals.php

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    The Most Sophisticated Flickr Maps We've Ever Seen
    by Emily Badger


    Luminous Cities

    We've come across a lot of nice Flickr visualizations of global cities but never anything quite this comprehensive across space and time: Meet Luminous Cities, a creation of the London-based mapping and digital arts firm TraceMedia, built with support from the Centre for Spatial Analysis & Policy at the University of Leeds and the Centre for Advanced Spatial Analysis at University College London. The project is trying to "uncover the archeology of data traces left by social media" in cities across the globe.

    The Flickr tool in particular contains an enormous wealth of data – photos themselves, their location, the topical tags associated with them – that can be spliced in infinite ways and visualized across time to illustrate individual events like a natural disaster, or specific geographies like the one associated with Occupy protesters. TraceMedia initially launched the project last year in London, but recently updated it to include more than 50 global cities, some with Flickr data going back as far as 2004. You can view any city during a specific window of time, or in an animation over time, while simultaneously plotting multiple tags (like in the London map shown above).

    Here, for instance, is downtown Detroit, shown between May of 2009 and June of 2013, with a smattering of the 1,181 photos tagged during that time with the only-in-Detroit idiom "urbanexploration." Some of the associated photos are shown at right, with an obvious heavy emphasis on Michigan Central Station.



    Here is Manhattan in October and November of last year, showing photos tagged with "sandy" and "hurricanesandy":



    Click here and play the timeline at the bottom of the page and you can watch all of those dots suddenly appear in the middle of the animation, only to disappear almost entirely by the end of November.

    Here is a similar historically interesting moment in time from London, taken in the summer months of 2011, when the city experienced a rash of riots, variously noticeable in the terms "fire," "destruction," "riot" and more:



    Using time, geography and language, these maps tell encoded stories about how events are tied to place, as well as how the same space is often simultaneously used for multiple purposes by different people. You could repeat these experiments in any number of these other cities (and if you find some good patterns, please share them in the comments section below).
    Here is one last map illustrating the many uses of a particularly symbolic space: the area around the National Mall in Washington, shown throughout 2012:



    The fire-engine red dots show the city's three mains pockets of Occupy protests, in McPherson Square, Freedom Plaza, and near the U.S. Capitol. The dark green suggests some kind of Abu Ghraib protest. If you watch the timeline animation here, you'll see the sudden sprouting of feminists from the steps of the White House to the Washington Monument, as well as, later, a Million Puppet March to the capitol. "11november2012" is a reference to Veteran's Day, and most of those lime-green dots cluster around the war memorials on the west end of the National Mall. And all those pink dots around the Tidal Basin? Those are the Cherry Blossoms that appear for only about two weeks in the spring. With the timeline, you can watch them bloom and fade as well.

    All maps courtesy of TraceMedia.

    http://m.theatlanticcities.com/techn...ver-seen/6186/

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