Results 1 to 13 of 13

Thread: 450 Lexington Avenue - by Warren & Wetmore / Tower by Skidmore, Owings & Merrill

  1. #1

    Default 450 Lexington Avenue - by Warren & Wetmore / Tower by Skidmore, Owings & Merrill

    450 Lexington Avenue-

    Lexington Avenue and 45th Street
    Height: 568 feet 173 metres
    Floors: 32
    Finished: 1992
    Zip Code: 10017
    Architect: Skidmore, Owings & Merrill LLP, Warren & Wetmore

    http://www.450lexington.com/



    They have a nice map here-
    http://www.450lexington.com/map.shtml


    Emporis- 450 Lexington Avenue


    Images and Text from SOM Website-

    Built over the historic Grand Central Station Post Office, 450 Lexington Avenue is a 40-story office tower. The design addresses both the aesthetic and the technical issues of the project by solving the structural intricacies of locating footings between the railroad tracks of Grand Central Station, while maintaining the spirit of the original landmark building. Completed in 1991, the 800,000 sf building establishes a strong presence on an important Midtown site while remaining consistent with the details of its historic base.

    In this constricted neighborhood, the full height of the project is rarely seen as a whole. To consolidate the glimpses of the building one sees from the street, neighboring buildings and distant angles, a consistent building theme of rotated-square decorative elements taken from the Post Office's facade were incorporated throughout the building, culminating in a crowning basket of metal and glass at the top of the tower. This crown, illuminated from within at night, marks 450 Lexington's image among the historic buildings within this portion of Manhattan's skyline.

    The construction of the building went forward based on SOM's success in reshaping the building core and interior column-free space for the particular requirements of the proposed primary tenant who occupied approximately one-half of the office floor space. Access to the office tower is through a processional sequence of spaces rarely seen in New York, beginning with the existing structure's monumental portals serving as ground floor entrance lobbies. Shuttle elevators transfer tenants to the sixth-floor sky lobby, a grand double-height space overlooking seasonal gardens.


    Edward, you dont have a page for this on the Wired New York site?
    Last edited by Law & Order; August 9th, 2007 at 12:43 AM.

  2. #2
    Forum Veteran
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    New York City
    Posts
    3,298

    Default

    The ornate exterior of the the base betrays little of the interior of the post office, which is blandly modernized.

    If anyone has seen Almost Famous, you'll note that the obligatory streetscape shots of New York when the band comes to the city includes a shot of the Park Avenue South facade of Grand Central, with 450 Lex clearly shown in the background. Of course, the film is set in 1973, which makes the appearance of an office tower completed in 1992 unlikely. A great movie nonetheless.

  3. #3
    Forum Veteran
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Manhattan
    Posts
    2,636

    Default

    building is a gem, 100% leased

  4. #4
    Forum Veteran
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    New York City
    Posts
    3,298

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by kliq6
    building is a gem, 100% leased
    No doubts there. It's one of SOM's better projects anywhere, and its proximity to GCT gives it a distinct advantage.

  5. #5
    Senior Member Bob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Fairfax, VA
    Posts
    926

    Default

    Ghastly. In the same league as 60 Wall Street. Ugh.

  6. #6

    Default

    I think it's much better and less noticeable than 60 Wall. This is one of SOM's best in NYC, a great pomo tower.

  7. #7

    Default

    You can never satisfy anyone. Here's a situation just like Hearst. I remember when Hearst was being built many called for a historical addition like this, yet others hate this approach. Personally I like both, ofcourse Hearst is better.

  8. #8

    Default

    Only slightly more slick than its corporate post-modern contemporaries. A lot of vaguely fascist nonsense.

  9. #9
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    NYC - Downtown
    Posts
    32,654

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by dbhstockton
    Only slightly more slick than its corporate post-modern contemporaries. A lot of vaguely fascist nonsense.
    The Italians did much better "fascist nonsense" :

    http://www.nyc-architecture.com/ARCH...Fascist-IT.htm

  10. #10
    Forum Veteran
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    New York City
    Posts
    3,298

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by dbhstockton
    Only slightly more slick than its corporate post-modern contemporaries. A lot of vaguely fascist nonsense.
    If that's what you believe, then I'd recommend that you steer clear of Chicago for just the same reasons.

  11. #11
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    N40° 44' 53.977" W073° 59' 10.812"
    Posts
    60

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by dbhstockton
    Only slightly more slick than its corporate post-modern contemporaries. A lot of vaguely fascist nonsense.
    Vaguely fascist? You feel oppressed by this building? I've worked in the neighborhood since groundbreaking and never heard such idiocy. Try venturing outdoors to visit the area. This was a strictly money-making project, a background building designed with a paltry nod to the GCT complex; the design lacks any further pretensions. In fact, due to the setback atop the post office, the building is mostly obscured from the street.

  12. #12
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Far West Village, NYC
    Posts
    927

    Default

    I found a rare rendering of the original 450 Lex, as designed by Warren & Wetmore in 1910:


    Originally the building was to span from 43rd to 45th (only half was actually constructed), and the massive six-story pedestal was to house 12 floors of offices for the NY Central Railroad.

    It was one of the few (maybe only) buildings to adhere strictly to the original Terminal City master plan, which had many identical six story "plinths" from which various towers would later be built at setbacks (which interestingly happened at 450 Lex in post-modern form many decades later).

  13. #13
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    7,476

    Default

    ^ Interesting.

    I've always liked 450 Lex, for the colour of the windows, but especially for what appear to be some vaguely Art Deco-like (?) elements near the top. SOM did well here. IMO, not overwhelming like 60 Wall.


    http://www.emporis.com/application/?nav=image&id=720833

Similar Threads

  1. New York Times Tower - 620 Eighth Avenue @ W. 41st Street - by Renzo Piano
    By noharmony in forum New York Skyscrapers and Architecture
    Replies: 3237
    Last Post: June 4th, 2014, 02:39 PM
  2. 383 Madison Avenue - former Bear Stearns Building - by Skidmore, Owings & Merrill
    By Derek2k3 in forum New York Skyscrapers and Architecture
    Replies: 89
    Last Post: September 5th, 2010, 10:11 AM
  3. 101 West End Avenue
    By Edward in forum New York Real Estate
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: February 24th, 2003, 10:27 PM
  4. Central Synagogue - 652 Lexington Avenue
    By Edward in forum New York City Guide For Visitors
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: February 21st, 2003, 10:49 AM
  5. Special Issues for Merrill, the Landlord
    By Edward in forum New York Real Estate
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: January 23rd, 2002, 12:04 PM

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  


Google+ - Facebook - Twitter - Meetup

Edward's photos on Flickr - Wired New York on Flickr - In Queens - In Red Hook - Bryant Park - SQL Backup Software