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Thread: Google Earth

  1. #31
    Chief Antagonist Ninjahedge's Avatar
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    Don't worry, Dick Cheney will be blurred out for National Security.

  2. #32

  3. #33
    Moderator NYatKNIGHT's Avatar
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    ^Cool. I am one of those dots.

  4. #34

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    ^
    So you went to DC.

    We thought about it. Had an invite from friends who worked the campaign in VA. In the end, big-screen TV at my brother's house won out. Most of the family took the day off and we had a party.

  5. #35
    Moderator NYatKNIGHT's Avatar
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    Didn't take much for the DC/MD/VA cousins to persuade me and my siblings to come down. They have houses/apartments to stay in, offices downtown for staging, local bar knowledge, and some tickets (which I lost out on).

    I've been getting lots of negative comments since I got back, like I must be crazy for standing out in the cold with all the crowds for something we couldn't see up close, but there was nothing negative about that experience. It was wonderful, no regrets whatsoever! The right clothes negate the cold. There was quite a bit of walking, but the festive crowds were polite and respectful, and it never was too densely packed despite how it looked on t.v. Looking at that satellite photo shows there was a lot more open space than it seemed from the perspective of the Capitol.

    The people in my section were...let's say, "less than respectful" whenever they showed Bush or Cheney on the jumbotrons. Some pretty hilarious comments actually, I mean come on! Cheney in a wheelchair? Not to mention a rousing rendition of "Hit the Road Jack" when W's helicopter flew over the Mall.

  6. #36

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    How about...

    Na-na-na-na.
    Na-na-na-na.
    Hey, hey, hey.
    Goodbye.

  7. #37
    Moderator NYatKNIGHT's Avatar
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    ^LOTS of that.

    The very first time they showed Bush you could hear a pin drop it got so quiet, which then lead to boisterous laughter. After that, the genie was out of the bottle.

  8. #38

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    My sister-in-law is African American, and they've had a long, tough road. That was the place for me to be.

    Other choices were Foley Square or one of the Downtown pubs. One of my favorites got some press.

    http://www.tribecatrib.com/news/news...ma0109009.html

  9. #39
    Moderator NYatKNIGHT's Avatar
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    Nice. It was quite a day everywhere.

  10. #40

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    I watched the live coverage here on the BBC, great moment to see.

  11. #41

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    Anti-terror bill targets online mapping services

    By Jim Sanders
    Published: Thursday, Apr. 2, 2009 - 12:00 am | Page 1A


    California has a new idea for thwarting terrorism: Attackers might not hit what they can't see.

    Assemblyman Joel Anderson is pushing to ban online mapping services from publishing clear photos of key buildings used by the public – but fuzzy images would be fine.

    "All I'm asking is that they reduce the level of detail," he said. "They can either smear it or back (the camera) off."

    America's enemies benefit from detailed aerial, satellite and street-view images of schools, churches, hospitals and government buildings, Anderson contends.

    Terrorists have push-button access to minute details of the buildings' exits, windows, facades, access routes – even rooftop vents, he said.

    The Alpine Republican points to news reports that terrorists who attacked various locations in Mumbai, India, last year used digital maps and other high-technology equipment.

    "We should not be helping bad people map their next target," Anderson said.

    Violators of Anderson's legislation, Assembly Bill 255, could face fines of $250,000 per day and prison terms of up to three years.

    Critics dismiss the bill as a feel-good measure that would not stop terrorists and could prompt all 50 states to adopt differing standards on mapping browsers.

    Assemblyman Paul Krekorian, D-Burbank, called the legislation a "fairly superficial response."

    "I don't see that it's going to contribute a lot to the global war on terrorism if we prohibit al-Qaida from using Google in California," Krekorian said.

    Assemblyman Chuck DeVore, an Irvine Republican and former military intelligence officer, said the bill could open a Pandora's box.

    "My concern is, what's next?" DeVore said. "Do politicians then demand that we blur out images of the homes of law enforcement personnel – or elected officials?"

    Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger and state homeland security officials have taken no position on AB 255, which has not yet been debated in legislative committees.

    The U.S. Department of Homeland Security declined substantive comment Tuesday but said it has not expressed security concerns to Google.

    Google, a kingpin of online mapping, contends that AB 255 may violate free-speech rights and impair interstate commerce.

    Microsoft Corp., which also provides an online mapping service, declined comment on AB 255.

    Passage of the bill would not bar professional or amateur photographers, commercial firms or public agencies from posting detailed photos of key buildings on the Internet.

    "Were this bill to pass, the same satellite images would still be publicly available," Google states in a letter to lawmakers.

    Restricting detailed imagery is not unprecedented, however. Google's street-view maps already blur the faces of passing people and cars.

    The U.S. Department of Defense banned the commercial gathering of detailed street-view imagery on military bases and installations last year after Google published detailed images of Fort Sam Houston in Texas.

    Anderson said that detailed photos of Israeli buildings also are restricted. He points to news reports of officials in India vowing to seek restrictions on online mapping.

    "I don't want to wait until a Californian dies," Anderson said of AB 255. "I want to act now to protect them."

    Republican Assemblywoman Connie Conway said that Tulare County teenagers have used online maps to identify foreclosed homes with swimming pools so that they can trespass and skateboard in them.

    Even if AB 255 would not stop terrorism, it could send a valuable message, she said.

    "Why should we make it easier?" Conway said of attacks against the United States.

    Pedestrians in downtown Sacramento had mixed views when told of the bill.

    "Anything that you can do to make things safer, I'm for, " said Lisa Laprade, 42, of Rancho Cordova.

    But Jon Strohl, 34, of Sacramento said he is reluctant to support Anderson's plan.

    "How many rights do we need to give up to protect ourselves?" he said.

    Brian Jackson, associate director of the Rand Corp.'s homeland security research program, said terrorists tend not to rely exclusively upon satellite images, which can be outdated or fail to contain all the information needed.

    "Most terrorists do on-site surveillance before they attack," Jackson said.

    Elaine Filadelfo, Google spokeswoman, said only that the firm has met with Anderson and plans to continue doing so.

    In a three-page letter to lawmakers, however, Google says AB 255 amounts to censorship against detailed maps that could be invaluable in relief efforts after emergencies or natural disasters.

    Google also noted technical concerns. For example, the street address of a church would not always be enough information to pinpoint what would require blurring, it said.

    "We don't know where that church is relative to that address – which side of the street, how far up or down the street, and the size of the church property or lot," Google said.

    "We do not know if there are new churches, older buildings that are no longer churches, a church that meets in a private meeting facility or auditorium, and so on."

    Privately, Google says it works cooperatively to address security concerns. The firm produces street-view images but obtains from other sources, including public agencies, many of the aerial and satellite photos it posts online.

    Anderson said he is willing to compromise, including carving out exceptions for emergency response and allowing detailed views of key buildings if requested by their owners.

    But Anderson has no plans to drop AB 255.

    "For us to ignore (a threat) would be unconscionable," he said.


    Call Jim Sanders, Bee Capitol Bureau, (916) 326-5538.

  12. #42
    Chief Antagonist Ninjahedge's Avatar
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    Passage of the bill would not bar professional or amateur photographers, commercial firms or public agencies from posting detailed photos of key buildings on the Internet.
    How much you wabt to bet that that list is never made truly public?

    I can see another round of police harassing people for taking photos. ESPECIALLY for such terrorist targets as:

    The ESB
    Rocerfeller Center
    The Crysler (sp) building.
    The UN
    The Mayors Mansion
    ALL the monuments in Washington.

    I mean, our nation is just not SAFE when so many people are taking pictures of this!!!!




    Bottom line is that, yes, this satelite mapping IS handy to terrorists. It makes their lives easier. But if they can't find it online, a few thousand will get them up in a copter for an arial tour anyway. What, we want to start treating all of the US like it was under a military lockdown?

    Sometimes it is easier to deal with the bed the dog lies in and give it a bath than pick out every single individual flea with a hammer.

  13. #43

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    Turning Google Street View Into Art
    By Cliff Kuang on December 16, 2009


    [Slideshow]

    The artist Jon Rafman is an alchemist. His best-known project takes the dumb, unblinking eye of Google Streetviews and turns it into an art medium. Combing through thousands upon thousands of images, he collects ones that feel like straight-up photography--images that suggest a hidden story; capture a fleeting, sweet moment; or simply document a beautiful landscape.

    His collections first appeared as part of a long essay on the blog Art Fag City, titled "The Nine Eyes of Street Views." But since then, Rafman's been busy: He's preparing the images for huge prints that will be displayed in an upcoming art exhibition, and he's also about to run a second printing of his book, 16 Google Street Views (the first printing disappeared almost immediately after it was announced). In advance of that, he generously provided Fast Company with a peek at his collection--many of which haven't been published before. At least not on Google Street Views, anyway.

  14. #44
    Chief Antagonist Ninjahedge's Avatar
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    Some interesting stuff... I wonder what permissions and ownership all this "art" has......

  15. #45
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
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    Not sure what to think about this.


    Open Books: Street View...

    By J. DAVID GOODMAN

    Say what you will about the privacy concerns raised by Google Street View, it does provide one valuable service besides the ability to virtually visit Johannesburg: catching criminals in the act.

    Following on the theory about stopped watches being right twice a day, the millions of snap shots taken by the service capture all sorts of behavior, good and bad, including drug dealing in Williamsburg.

    On Wednesday, police arrested seven members of an alleged heroin trafficking ring, some of whom can be seen on Street View lolling about the corner of Kingsland Avenue and Jackson Street. As Free Williamsburg notes, these guys were apparently on the corner so frequently as to become part of the scenery. It would have been surprising had they not been spotted by Google’s all-seeing eye.

    http://cityroom.blogs.nytimes.com/20...n/#more-242563

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