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Thread: Google Earth

  1. #61

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    think Google's cameras are invasive... look into the military's image taking satellite technology (think Hubble pointed down toward earth), they actually have one.

  2. #62

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    More people seem to get up in arms about video; but are oblivious, and welcoming, of electronic surveillance, which is much more invasive.

    Walk around with you face in a smart-phone, accessing sites, your accounts - systems know who you are, where you are, your travel routine, your preferences, not 2 or 3 years ago, but in real time.

  3. #63

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    Much of this is a cultural difference. Europe has much tougher privacy laws and data collecting laws than the US.

    And with private information, Europeans will have more trust in government and less trust in corporations.

  4. #64
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    Ya, anyway... here's a fascinating addition to the Google Earth repertoire:

    Google Earth Historical Layer Adds WWII Images

    The effects of World War II were far-reaching, but hard to put into perspective from the texts of history books. From the bombed-out streets of London to devastated monuments in Paris, Google is adding historical imagery to Google Earth to provide a more complete look at the widespread destruction caused by the war.

    "There are history books, movies, and photographs, but they portray isolated places and events more than the connected whole," chief technology advocate Michael T. Jones, wrote in a blog post. "So we've addressed this by launching historical imagery in Google Earth in a number of new areas, including London in 1945, in coordination with archivists in these countries."

    The new feature, made available Thursday, lets users see before and after images of places including buildings, monuments, and snapshots from everyday life.
    Data like this was first made available when Google Earth 5.0 launched last February. Composite images from war-torn locales like Stuttgart, Germany; Naples, Italy; and Lyon, France showed the devastation of a conflict most people are too young to understand. Shots from Poland allowed users to see Warsaw, a beautiful city in 1935 that was 85 percent destroyed just 10 years later.

    Google said Thursday's addition to these archival photographs includes most of 1945 London and Paris as well as other notable places in Europe. To discover these cities, type the name of the city in the upper left part of the browser and click the clock icon to launch historical imagery. Explorers can scroll through a timeline feature to determine the year they want to check out, from 1945 to present day. Current images are also available in Street View and Google Maps.

    Last week, Google announced a partnership with Slooh to show live images from space via Google Earth's Sky layer.

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  5. #65

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    Corporate America wants us all to roll over and play dead.

    From Google with their lack of concern for your privacy, to Monsanto with their genetically modified crops. You are expected to lay back and relax.

    The kvetching and moaning in Europe over Google might make more sense if one understands our privacy laws and the environment that Google finds it's self in here:

    Excepts from MSNBC:

    ‘La difference’ is stark in EU, U.S. privacy laws

    European courts and lawmakers have been wrestling with the implications of technology and privacy ever since, often coming to conclusions that are foreign to their American counterparts.

    In Europe, privacy is different

    Some of those rulings might seem like a panacea for Americans who believe their privacy is slowly slipping away. In many parts of Europe, for example:

    - Personal information cannot be collected without consumers’ permission, and they have the right to review the data and correct inaccuracies.

    - Companies that process data must register their activities with the government.

    - Employers cannot read workers’ private e-mail.

    - Personal information cannot be shared by companies or across borders without express permission from the data subject.

    - Checkout clerks cannot ask for shoppers’ phone numbers.

    Those rights, and many others, stem from The European Union Directive on Data Protection of 1995, which mandated that each EU nation pass a national privacy law and create a Data Protection Authority to protect citizens' privacy and investigate attacks on it.

    National laws come in several flavors, and emanate from varied traditions. But taken together, they are the backbone of a basic European principle: Privacy is a human right."

    "The reason that privacy laws in Europe and the U.S. are so different springs from a basic divergence in attitude: Europeans reserve their deepest distrust for corporations, while Americans are far more concerned about their government invading their privacy."

    Full article here: http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/15221111...e-privacy_lost

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    Privacy Laws Trip Up Google’s Expansion in Parts of Europe

    Google is getting caught in a web of privacy laws that threaten its growth and the positive image it has cultivated as a company dedicated to doing good.

    In Switzerland, data protection officials are quietly pressing Google to scrap its plans to introduce Street View, a mapping service that provides a vivid, 360-degree, ground-level photographic panorama from any address, which would violate strict Swiss privacy laws that prohibit the unauthorized use of personal images or property.

    In Germany, where Street View is also not available, simply taking photographs for the service violates privacy laws.

    http://www.nytimes.com/2008/11/18/te.../18google.html

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    IMHO, in the end Google will be successful here but forcing the company to include safeguards is a wise one.
    Last edited by Fabrizio; November 14th, 2010 at 09:51 AM.

  6. #66
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    ^Of course they will. And of course we should. Obvious stuff. Distrust of corporations at this point is a given and I don't think anybody here is against safeguards, or against pressuring corporations to do the right thing; personally it seems like I spent my entire twenties protesting against things like Monsanto's GMOs and corporate trade agreements from Miami to Seattle and DC.

    But I also understand the bigger problem with corporations to be a global one and not just American...I understand that unfortunate trade agreements have been signed by parties including Europe...so I have to laugh when I read this:

    Corporate America wants us all to roll over and play dead.
    because while that may be true, it's hardly limited to corporate America. Welcome to the Planet Earth, circa 2010. Pick your battle and fight it....God bless ya...but regarding Google Earth just realize that more detailed mapping of the planet's surface is inevitable...including streets and buildings and everything else that's already public... I'm glad so much of the information is being made easily available to us all, and not just the "corporations" or government.

  7. #67
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    Continuing right along...the potential for these Google Earth historical layers I referred to in post #64 is incredible. This could be an evolution in how history (and probably everything else) will be presented to students in the future. It's tremendous.

  8. #68

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    The Ends of the Road

    Alan Taylor

    Inspired in part by the great geography game GeoGuessr, I spent some time recently in Google Maps, finding the edges of their Street View image coverage. I've always been drawn to the end of the road, to the edges of where one might be allowed to travel, whether blocked by geographic features, international borders, or simply the lack of any further road. Gathered below is a virtual visit to a few of these road ends around the world -- borders, shorelines, dead ends and overlooks from New Zealand to Svalbard, from Alaska to South Africa.


    At the end of the Milford Sound Highway, in Southland, New Zealand, part of Fiordland National Park. See it Mapped. (© Google, Inc.)

    26 photos with Google street views

  9. #69
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    To me, the ultimate end of the road is the impasse between North & South America, at the Darién Gap in Panama. It's where dreams die, so to speak!

    No street view to be found here, unfortunately

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