Page 3 of 11 FirstFirst 1234567 ... LastLast
Results 31 to 45 of 159

Thread: Stamford, CT

  1. #31

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Bob View Post
    5. Remove height restrictions on all buildings; eliminate zoning restrictions on signs and advertisements.
    6. Allow advertising signage along I-95. (Restaurants should be able to advertise.)
    7. Consider NEON as the city's chosen art form.
    Let 'em know what you think. I'm sure you'll be a big hit in Stamford, Bob.

  2. #32
    Build the Tower Verre antinimby's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    in Limbo
    Posts
    8,976

    Default

    The same can be said for New York also.

  3. #33
    Forum Veteran
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Battery Park City
    Posts
    1,199

    Default

    Planning Board likes plan for Ritz

    By Doug Dalena
    Staff Writer

    January 10, 2007

    STAMFORD - A revised plan for a twin-towered Ritz-Carlton hotel and condominium complex at Atlantic Street and Tresser Boulevard won the unanimous endorsement of the Planning Board last night.

    Developers F.D. Rich Co. and Cappelli Enterprises will present the proposal to the Zoning Board, which has final approval for the project, during a Jan. 22 public hearing.

    Atlantic Centre would include 289 condominiums and 198 hotel rooms in two 400-foot towers flanking the Atlantic Street post office.

    "It's a spectacular design," said Robin Stein, the city's planning director.

    The towers would become the city's tallest buildings, and with the proposed Tresser Square development across the street - with three towers higher than 300 feet - could dramatically alter the city's skyline.

    The 1916-built post office would become the hotel's main restaurant, with outdoor seating at the top of the stone staircase leading from Atlantic Street, said Peter Brassard of Costas Kondylis and Partners, the architect.

    The original plan had the post office becoming the hotel's ballroom, but Ritz-Carlton officials wanted the space to have more daily activity, said Bruce Berg, Cappelli's executive vice president.

    The developers would demolish the post office's 1939 addition.

    The post office would open a branch within the new complex on Tresser Boulevard.

    In perhaps the most significant change to the proposal, the two towers are now rectangular instead of curved.

    The rectangular design allows more floor area and is less costly to build, said John Lindell, director of design and construction for F.D. Rich Co.

    A secondary entrance plaza on Federal Street is being changed to a driveway connecting to the main entrance plaza on Atlantic Street.

    The Zoning Board will be faced with whether to approve a change that would allow the 400-foot towers. The change would link the extra height - 50 feet above current regulations - to contributions to the Mill River Greenway project, if the Zoning Board granted a special exception. The Atlantic Centre proposal would require a $950,000 contribution, but the rule change would apply anywhere in the central business district.

    The Zoning Board rejected the same proposal when Rich and Cappelli sought approval for the Trump Parc condominium tower at Washington Boulevard and Broad Street. But several members said their main objection to the proposed 400-foot building was tied to the small half-acre development site. The board has since approved Trump Parc at 350 feet.

    The Ritz-Carlton would be built on 4.4 acres, some of which would be leased from the St. John Urban Development Corp., which owns two of its three affordable apartment towers on adjacent land.

    One side of the hotel parking garage would be 20 feet from the northern side of Tower C, the easternmost of the three St. John Towers, and another would be 40 feet from the eastern side of the tower. The condominium towers would each be 65 feet from Tower C.

    The extra 50 feet in height that Rich and Cappelli are requesting would allow a more slender design and provide more units with higher views, Berg said. That would increase the price of the uppermost units, making the project more likely to get financing, he said.

    "What the city gets is superior design," said William Hennessey, the developers' attorney. "It's a much more elegant design."

    Board member Jay Tepper questioned the wisdom of tying zoning bonuses such as extra height to cash payments, even when the city might need the money.

    "The end doesn't justify the means all the time," he said.

    Chairman Duane Hill said the city often grants bonuses if the developer provides something in return that benefits the city. The Mill River Greenway project would do that, and would need funding for years.

    "It's one thing to get it built," he said. "It's another thing to sustain and maintain it."

    In addition to the park contribution, the development would produce $2.4 million in annual property taxes and $3.8 million for affordable housing, the developers said.

    Copyright © 2007, Southern Connecticut Newspapers, Inc.

  4. #34

    Default trump parc stamford

    Looks like a 37 story Trump building broke ground in Stamford. I can't say it looks good, but I like the fact that the satellite cities around New York are seeing more healthy buildiup.

  5. #35
    Forum Veteran
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Battery Park City
    Posts
    1,199

    Default Parc Place

    PARC PLACE
    By KATHERINE DYKSTRA


    May 17, 2007 -- When plans were announced for City Place and Highgrove, two luxury high-rise condo buildings in downtown Stamford, Conn., the city was abuzz. With around 100 units apiece, both quickly garnered interest from buyers.

    "They were heavily pre-sold," said Jessica Dee Rohm, senior managing director for Cappelli Enterprises. "They sold like 60 percent at Highgrove."

    But neither building was able to achieve its financing, so despite interest and the caliber of the architects attached - Robert A.M. Stern was to design Highgrove, and Arquitectonica was working on City Place - the plans had to be scrapped.

    Now, another development team has come along with the goal of bringing new-construction high-rise condo living to Stamford. And this time we're betting it won't fail.

    The difference between those projects and this one? The developers' track records, which include similar buildings in Westchester that have met with tons of success.

    The developers are Donald Trump and Louis Cappelli, and this time they have teamed up with Thomas Rich of Stamford's F. D. Rich Company to build the 35-story Trump Parc Stamford.

    Just as before, the demand is there; after only one month of advertising, there were more than 200 names on the waiting list when ground was broken on Tuesday. And this is for 171 condos.

    "The building is selling like hotcakes, and we haven't even started construction," says Trump, who has worked with Cappelli on two previous projects: Trump Tower at City Center in White Plains and Trump Plaza in New Rochelle.

    Both were hugely successful (the New Rochelle building sold out in three months, notes Trump), bringing their respective areas higher price points and a flashy urban vibe.

    "Now it's time we moved this collaboration to Stamford; I think it's ready for downtown residential high-rises," says Cappelli.

    Trump Parc is the second part of a two-phase development, which started with 200,000 square feet of retail space and a 500-car parking garage at Washington Boulevard and Broad Street, in the central business district. The residential tower will begin on the seventh floor and will be made up of one-, two- and three-bedroom condos. The majority are two-bedrooms averaging 1,600 square feet and costing around $1 million.

    "It's a new price point for the area," says Cappelli. "We've reached that price point in White Plains at the Ritz-Carlton, so we know it's a good price for the Trump project."

    On average, the Ritz White Plains is seeing $1,000 per square foot with units on the higher floors seeing upwards of $2,000 a square foot.

    Most of the interested buyers thus far have been young professionals drawn to the area by the recent opening of the American headquarters of the United Bank of Switzerland and the impending opening of the same for the Royal Bank of Scotland. (According to Cappelli, the latter will bring more than 2,000 new people to the area within the next 14 to 15 months.) There are also many interested empty-nesters looking to move from the suburbs to the city.

    With that in mind, Cappelli has more plans for Stamford, including a Ritz-Carlton hotel/condo estimated to contain "about 300 units."

    "There's probably going to be demand there for three or four projects," says Cappelli. "We're looking for other sites and even have contracts out now."
    And, Cappelli boasts: "It's already a 24-hour city, there's restaurants and nightlife and theaters and culture. It's on the the Long Island Sound. It's a mini-Manhattan."

    Trump agrees: "It's happening; it's a great location. A lot of tremendous things have happened in Stamford."

    Designed by Costas Kondylis, Trump Parc will be Connecticut's first LEED-certified green high-rise, and will include 13,000 square feet of amenities, such as a lap pool, 20-seat screening room, billiard room and outdoor recreation deck.

    There will be a 36,000-square-foot restaurant, which will also provide room service and catering to residents.

    At 35 stories, it will also eclipse Landmark Tower as the tallest building around.

    "Landmark Tower, at 270 feet, was a symbol of the city's revitalization [when it was built in 1970]," says Rich. The F.D. Rich Company was designated the sole redeveloper of the downtown urban renewal project in 1960. "Now, Trump Parc, at 350 feet, will serve as a new landmark."

  6. #36

    Default why did the high grove fail?

    I'm surprised that didn't get built. What happened?

    I do think this project will go forward - they already have the financing.

  7. #37

    Default antares project

    http://www.nytimes.com/2007/05/21/ny...1stamford.html

    Looks like this is getting closer to approval. Should be beneficial, but I think it would benefit if there was some sort of light rail or shuttle to the train station.

  8. #38

    Default Light Rail Coming ?

    February 2008
    A Quarterly Newsletter for the Citizens of Stamford
    Vol. 8, No. 1
    Table of Contents

















































    CITY EXPLORES NEW LIGHT RAIL TRANSIT ROUTE TO CONNECT SOUTH END TO POINTS NORTH
    The Mayor’s announcement in October that the City has initiated a six month feasibility study for a new light rail transit route connecting the South End, Downtown and Bull’s Head commercial areas has generated interest in the press and with residents. The City’s proposed transit system is designed to address the Stamford region’s overwhelming traffic congestion and to develop innovative strategies for a more sustainable future for the City.
    With the major redevelopment of the City’s South End, the City is looking for ways to provide easy access to all parts of Stamford through public transportation. The proposed transit system would connect Stamford’s downtown core to the South End, Landmark Square, and the retail hub at Bull’s Head. By extending the range of access to the train station, Mayor Malloy contends, the City can increase the value of downtown real estate relative to other suburban office locations and provide a greater share of Stamford’s commuters with an attractive and cost effective alternative to single occupant vehicle commuting.
    Since 1985 more than 20 U.S. cities have built light rail systems. The largest systems (Boston, Los Angeles, Philadelphia, San Francisco and San Diego) have daily ridership of over 100,000. In addition to the approximately 20 U.S. cities that have built full scale light rail systems, an additional 20 or so have implemented shorter downtown oriented routes using historic streetcars. This is differentiated from the “trolley look” buses that are common in many cities in that the vehicle operates with electric overhead power (trolley pole) and rides on steel track. With a few exceptions, most heritage routes are substantially shorter (between one mile and six miles total length) and are focused on downtown circulation, rather than the movement of large numbers of daily commuters. The success of these transit projects in attracting ridership and offering transportation alternatives in similarly sized cities, has encouraged City of Stamford planners to pursue the project.

    Given Stamford’s size and potential for transit ridership, a lower cost alternative to a light rail system could be a single downtown light rail line, potentially beginning with only a single operational track with passing sidings. Much larger systems, including San Diego, Baltimore and Sacramento started initially with single track operation to limit their startup costs. With a much more modest capital investment than is required for a full scale light rail system, the City of Stamford can achieve many of the same objectives for its commercial core in terms of environmental benefits, transportation function and economic development.

    The current proposed plan traces a basic route along Atlantic and Bedford Streets. The viability of this route is enhanced by the upcoming widening of the Atlantic Street underpass and the potential for platform extension at the railroad station to facilitate access from the east. The recent Zoning Board approval for the Harbor Point component of the Antares project contains a condition that a four lane right of way be provided for those limited sections of the roadway where Antares owns frontage property.
    With a long range vision of light rail transit being analyzed during the coming fiscal year, funding opportunities can be identified and each segment of the Atlantic Street/Bedford Street right of way can be coordinated with future plans in the development of the South End, downtown and Bull’s Head areas.
    The proposed transit system is an innovative initiative that would benefit the City of Stamford in a number of ways. The project would catalyze Transit Oriented Development both in the traditional downtown core and in surrounding areas in the South End and Bull’s Head center. It would inevitably expand the customer base and customer access for existing downtown businesses and it would enhance the market value for downtown office, retail and residential development. The results of the feasibility study will be eagerly awaited by residents and visitors alike who are interested in finding alternatives to traffic congestion.

  9. #39

    Smile Light Rail Coming ?



    February 2008


    A Quarterly Newsletter for the Citizens of Stamford
    Vol. 8, No. 1
    Table of Contents


























    CITY EXPLORES NEW LIGHT RAIL TRANSIT ROUTE TO CONNECT SOUTH END TO POINTS NORTH
    The Mayor’s announcement in October that the City has initiated a six month feasibility study for a new light rail transit route connecting the South End, Downtown and Bull’s Head commercial areas has generated interest in the press and with residents. The City’s proposed transit system is designed to address the Stamford region’s overwhelming traffic congestion and to develop innovative strategies for a more sustainable future for the City.
    With the major redevelopment of the City’s South End, the City is looking for ways to provide easy access to all parts of Stamford through public transportation. The proposed transit system would connect Stamford’s downtown core to the South End, Landmark Square, and the retail hub at Bull’s Head. By extending the range of access to the train station, Mayor Malloy contends, the City can increase the value of downtown real estate relative to other suburban office locations and provide a greater share of Stamford’s commuters with an attractive and cost effective alternative to single occupant vehicle commuting.
    Since 1985 more than 20 U.S. cities have built light rail systems. The largest systems (Boston, Los Angeles, Philadelphia, San Francisco and San Diego) have daily ridership of over 100,000. In addition to the approximately 20 U.S. cities that have built full scale light rail systems, an additional 20 or so have implemented shorter downtown oriented routes using historic streetcars. This is differentiated from the “trolley look” buses that are common in many cities in that the vehicle operates with electric overhead power (trolley pole) and rides on steel track. With a few exceptions, most heritage routes are substantially shorter (between one mile and six miles total length) and are focused on downtown circulation, rather than the movement of large numbers of daily commuters. The success of these transit projects in attracting ridership and offering transportation alternatives in similarly sized cities, has encouraged City of Stamford planners to pursue the project.

    Given Stamford’s size and potential for transit ridership, a lower cost alternative to a light rail system could be a single downtown light rail line, potentially beginning with only a single operational track with passing sidings. Much larger systems, including San Diego, Baltimore and Sacramento started initially with single track operation to limit their startup costs. With a much more modest capital investment than is required for a full scale light rail system, the City of Stamford can achieve many of the same objectives for its commercial core in terms of environmental benefits, transportation function and economic development.

    The current proposed plan traces a basic route along Atlantic and Bedford Streets. The viability of this route is enhanced by the upcoming widening of the Atlantic Street underpass and the potential for platform extension at the railroad station to facilitate access from the east. The recent Zoning Board approval for the Harbor Point component of the Antares project contains a condition that a four lane right of way be provided for those limited sections of the roadway where Antares owns frontage property.
    With a long range vision of light rail transit being analyzed during the coming fiscal year, funding opportunities can be identified and each segment of the Atlantic Street/Bedford Street right of way can be coordinated with future plans in the development of the South End, downtown and Bull’s Head areas.
    The proposed transit system is an innovative initiative that would benefit the City of Stamford in a number of ways. The project would catalyze Transit Oriented Development both in the traditional downtown core and in surrounding areas in the South End and Bull’s Head center. It would inevitably expand the customer base and customer access for existing downtown businesses and it would enhance the market value for downtown office, retail and residential development. The results of the feasibility study will be eagerly awaited by residents and visitors alike who are interested in finding alternatives to traffic congestion.

  10. #40
    Forum Veteran
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    On the Rails in North NJ
    Posts
    2,585

    Default

    Here's some of my Stamford pictures...


    DSC04423 by Nexis4Jersey09, on Flickr


    DSC04424 by Nexis4Jersey09, on Flickr


    DSC04437 by Nexis4Jersey09, on Flickr


    DSC04496 by Nexis4Jersey09, on Flickr


    DSC04482 by Nexis4Jersey09, on Flickr

  11. #41

    Default

    Nice pics. I wasn't that impressed by it though(some trash in the streets, confusing transit center, decrepit buildings, etc.) but I did like the Plaza at the Town Center, and it's something that certain cities on here could use *coughDowntownNewarkcough*.

  12. #42
    Forum Veteran
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    On the Rails in North NJ
    Posts
    2,585

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Marv95 View Post
    Nice pics. I wasn't that impressed by it though(some trash in the streets, confusing transit center, decrepit buildings, etc.) but I did like the Plaza at the Town Center, and it's something that certain cities on here could use *coughDowntownNewarkcough*.
    I was mostly impressed with Stamford except a few poorer sections rubbing against the newer middle class areas.... The Transit center needs to be redesigned....its very confusing and the waiting area is weird.. It needs to be brought into the 21st Century. Like Jamaica Station.... There were so areas of Downtown leaving you with that wth impressive....


    DSC04452 by Nexis4Jersey09, on Flickr


    DSC04412 by Nexis4Jersey09, on Flickr

  13. #43
    Senior Member DMAG's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Trumbull, CT
    Posts
    255

    Default

    I've worked in Stamford for the past 3 years.... but live in Scarsdale, NY. Admittedly the city is a bit run down and there are some "questionable" areas, but it has some nice areas and some good restaurants. I just wish the Harlem train line line ran to Stamford....driving from Westchester during rush hour stinks. I watched the Trump Parc get built....was kinda cool to see that.

  14. #44

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by czsz View Post
    I'm curious as to what there is to Stamford beyond glass boxes hosting the offices of corporations too timid (or perhaps too tax-sheltered) to headquarter themselves in New York.
    Crack houses.

    Anyone thinking Stanford has arived, should try walking down to the train staion after the sun goes down. There are some very unsafe areas located in close proximity to UBS and RBS.

    I work in Stamford and am not a big fan.

  15. #45
    Forum Veteran
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    On the Rails in North NJ
    Posts
    2,585

    Default

    Stamford Update
    Harbor Point


    018 by Nexis4Jersey09, on Flickr


    020 by Nexis4Jersey09, on Flickr


    021 by Nexis4Jersey09, on Flickr


    022 by Nexis4Jersey09, on Flickr


    026 by Nexis4Jersey09, on Flickr


    028 by Nexis4Jersey09, on Flickr


    029 by Nexis4Jersey09, on Flickr


    031 by Nexis4Jersey09, on Flickr


    033 by Nexis4Jersey09, on Flickr


    035 by Nexis4Jersey09, on Flickr


    036 by Nexis4Jersey09, on Flickr


    038 by Nexis4Jersey09, on Flickr


    040 by Nexis4Jersey09, on Flickr


    049 by Nexis4Jersey09, on Flickr


    050 by Nexis4Jersey09, on Flickr


    052 by Nexis4Jersey09, on Flickr


    055 by Nexis4Jersey09, on Flickr


    056 by Nexis4Jersey09, on Flickr

Page 3 of 11 FirstFirst 1234567 ... LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  


Google+ - Facebook - Twitter - Meetup

Edward's photos on Flickr - Wired New York on Flickr - In Queens - In Red Hook - Bryant Park - SQL Backup Software