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Thread: New Calatrava-designed Tower in Chicago to surpass Sears Tower

  1. #16
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    re: Fordham Spire

    oooh, nice...


    T W I S T & S H O U T : C A L A T R A V A ! ! !

  2. #17
    Chief Antagonist Ninjahedge's Avatar
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    Holy nightmarish floor plans batman!!!!!


    Also, I wonder where the tuned mass damper is going to be? With than much spiral, it is awfully hard to get the brace frames that far from center......

  3. #18
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    Here is a link to a terrific Calatrava site (titled "The Unofficial Site"):

    http://www.calatrava.info/

    No info there yet on Fordham Spire, but lots of great images and info on his other works.

  4. #19

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    Tower would get city in touch with its feminine side

    July 26, 2005

    BY KEVIN NANCE ARCHITECTURE CRITIC
    Chicago Sun-Times


    The tradition of Chicago architecture is a manly one, and not only because virtually all of its best-known architects (notwithstanding current rising stars Carol Ross Barney and Jeanne Gang) have been men. From Jenney to Sullivan to Mies, the signal qualities of great buildings in the City of Big Shoulders have had masculine connotations: a pumped-up muscularity, a solidity, a broadness. We're particularly defined by our tall buildings, and can anything be more phallic than a skyscraper? Symbolically speaking, we're a metropolis of satyrs.


    But if his proposed Fordham Spire manages to clear the regulatory, political and financial briar patch that now lies before it, Spanish architect Santiago Calatrava will bring something startlingly new to the Chicago skyline: a feminine mystique.

    Although he tends to distance himself from interpretations of his designs as "organic" or anthropomorphic -- the evocative nature of his work, he claims, is usually a byproduct of structural considerations -- Calatrava has designed a building that looks for all the world like a tall, stately woman in a flowing, gauzy gown that swirls around her legs. It's exactly the manner of Ginger Rogers on a dance floor with Fred Astaire: the ethereal lightness, the illusion of movement. You're ready to fly down to Rio whenever she is.

    You find this sensuous, even sexy quality in the unlikeliest corners of Calatrava's output. It's there in his bridges and transit stations, which are often topped with curving, undulant structures that hint at a feminine languor, of which I think the architect is at least partly aware.

    The evidence is in his preparatory doodlings for projects like the Liege Railway station in Belgium, which include a watercolor sketch of a voluptuously reclining female nude; the station roof's curves echo hers. There's more of this kind of thing in his Fordham Spire sketchbook, which is full of lithe dancers straight out of Matisse.

    Joining the boys club


    Then there are Calatrava's interior spaces, many of which are as genital as anything in the famously humid flower paintings of Georgia O'Keefe. (The artist always denied that she intended any such imagery, and maybe she didn't, but failing to see it requires an act of willful blindness.) The exterior of Calatrava's addition to the Milwaukee Art Museum is often compared to a bird spreading its wings, but look inside at the main hall and you'll see, in its bisected ceiling and related ornaments, wings of a different sort.

    It's a tricky business, politically and otherwise, to impute gender characteristics to inanimate objects, but of course we do it all the time. In our Anglo-Saxon lexicon, ships are female; so are certain countries and, in fact, the Earth. In the Romance languages, including Calatrava's native tongue, every noun is assigned a feminine or masculine article. If he thinks of bridges, airport terminals, train stations and even skyscrapers in terms of the female, why not?

    And if this produces a building that adds a fresh element to the boys club of Chicago architecture, cherchez la femme.

    SLIDESHOW

  5. #20
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    Great design. Am I the only one pissed this isn't going to be here?

  6. #21

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    This is awesone.

    This tower does not belong in NY for several reasons:

    1. NY is an anti-development city. We can't even build a stadium in a dilapidated area in which a private developer wants to make a $1B investment! If someone wanted to build a tower this tall here, people living in rent-controlled units would freak out that it would block their sunlight. Look at how Ratner was put over a barrel for the Gehry tower!

    2. NY is OUTRAGEOUSLY expensive. I was shocked to see that this tower would cost $500M. In NY, this would cost at least $1.5B. Did anyone see the post in the section on Wired NY re: NYC Hotels in which a developer said that there's a lot of demand for new hotels and that developers want to build them but that it's too expensive to make it worthwhile? This is a problem. In my opinion, the city should get developers to build high end hotels on the blighted sections of 5th that I've mentioned and acquire the sites via eminent domain.

    PS: This is the quote that I referred to:

    "....Still, some developers see a downside to the current market. Izak Senbahar, who built the year-old Alex hotel at 205 E. 45th St., says land is too expensive. He paid $85 a square foot for the land where The Alex stands; today, he says, he would have to pay between $300 and $400 a square foot.

    "I'd love to build another hotel," says Mr. Senbahar, who owns seven residential properties here. "But it's hard to make the financial analysis work with those numbers."

    ©2005 Crain Communications Inc.
    Last edited by londonlawyer; July 26th, 2005 at 11:36 AM.

  7. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by PHLguy
    ^hello...Freedom Tower? (If either are built)


    Other than FT wasn't the con ed supposed to have an 85 floor office tower with 3 80 floor apt? or was that cancelled, other than that, your right, chicago makes NY look like it has no balls.

    While the Freedom Tower will be quite tall, it will actually be no taller than the original WTC., accept for yet another antenna. Chicago still ranks number 1 in terms of building height in the country. They have no where near the number of buildings New York has but the ones it does have do really scrape the sky! More power to Chicago, they lack in many ways for such a large city but they certainly strive for fantastic architecture and development!

  8. #23

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    For some reason whenever I see Fordham Spire I think Freedom Spire.

    The design is somewhat unoriginal, I've always had that complaint of Calatrava but with some fine tuning it should look fine enough and to an unknowing critic it should look fantastic. I suppose thats all that matters.

  9. #24

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    Are you saying that the spire is unoriginal, Stern? It fits well with the building, I think, which is a lot more than can be said for, say, the pile that sits atop a very graceful Bloomberg Building.

    Calatrava is a genius. That's an overused word, but he's worthy of it in its proper sense.

  10. #25
    The Dude Abides
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    Quote Originally Posted by PHLguy
    ^hello...Freedom Tower? (If either are built)


    Other than FT wasn't the con ed supposed to have an 85 floor office tower with 3 80 floor apt? or was that cancelled, other than that, your right, chicago makes NY look like it has no balls.
    No, you cannot compare this to the Freedom Tower. The two have nothing in common. One is residential/hotel, the other is commercial. One will be built in Chicago, the other in New York. One is being built by a private developer financed by a bank, the other by someone who is using insurance money. The Freedom Tower will be built, whereas Fordham Spire is not definite.

    Why are you bringing up Con Ed? The site is being cleared, as someone mentioned, and we haven't even seen renderings from a winning architect. There's no telling what will happen.

    Maybe if you had some point of reference with the South Dearborn Tower that was proposed several years ago, you would agree how similar that proposal was to the Fordham Spire. The building was to be the nation's tallest, with a spire reaching 2,000 feet. It would have been part hotel, part residential. It would have been located in almost the exact same spot on the lakefront, and would also have had a very slender, albeit more traditional, shape.

    On a different note...It's interesting that we're seeing the beginnings of a New Yorkish resistance to tall construction in this "Streeterville" part of town. Call me crazy, but if Chicago eventually attracts enough wealthy residents who are anti-development for the same reasons as those on the Upper West and East sides, this type of building may soon be unbuildable there as well, or at least will be downsized significantly.

  11. #26

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    The design doesn't really say "Chicago" to me...it's a city of right angles, and elegantly so. This looks like a sort of arbitrary anomaly.

  12. #27

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    Quote Originally Posted by JD
    Are you saying that the spire is unoriginal, Stern? It fits well with the building, I think, which is a lot more than can be said for, say, the pile that sits atop a very graceful Bloomberg Building.

    Calatrava is a genius. That's an overused word, but he's worthy of it in its proper sense.
    Not the spire but the spiral.

  13. #28
    Forum Veteran krulltime's Avatar
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    I love it! Is just beautiful... Dont you wish you can be in one of those twisting apartments!

    Please guys let it grow in Chicago... We will get more buildings here with more names like Caltrava and others.

  14. #29

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    Quote Originally Posted by Stern
    For some reason whenever I see Fordham Spire I think Freedom Spire.

    The design is somewhat unoriginal, I've always had that complaint of Calatrava but with some fine tuning it should look fine enough and to an unknowing critic it should look fantastic. I suppose thats all that matters.
    I'm perplexed, Stern. How can the design be unoriginal? I can't think of another building in the world like it--save, perhaps, Calatrava's new tower in Sweden. And that looks positively blah compared to this thing.

  15. #30

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    PS: This makes Santiago's cube design for South Street look retarded!

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