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Thread: Roosevelt Island

  1. #61

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    Quote Originally Posted by Merry View Post
    Silicon Island

    Let the competition to turn New York into tech-central begin.

    by Julie V. Iovine
    Stanford Withdraws Roosevelt Island Bid


    Friday, December 16, 2011 | The Editors

    In a surprise move Stanford University announced today that they are withdrawing their bid to build a tech campus on Roosevelt Island. In a statement, the university said that several weeks’ worth of negotiations prompted the Board of Trustees to determine that the East Coast expansion was not in their best interest. “We are sorry that together we could not find a way to realize our mutual goals,” wrote Stanford president John Hennessy.

    The $200 million proposal with a master plan by Ennead was largely considered a front runner until this afternoon. The campus developed in a partnership with City College was to build more than 1.9 million square feet on the site now occupied by the Goldwater Hospital that would have brought housing for 200 profs and 2,000 students. While president Hennessy promised an accelerated launch—and a pledge of $1.5 bllion from a ten-year capital campaign—back in October, the plan seems to have fizzeled under pressure from students.

    “I applaud the mayor’s bold vision for this transformative project and wish the city well in turning that vision into a reality,” said Hennessy. “Stanford was very excited to participate in the competition, and we were honored to be selected as a finalist. We were looking forward to an innovative partnership with the city of New York.” The San Jose Mercury News noted that “Hennessy had cautioned that unless Stanford could get guarantees that it could build what it needs to build, plans will be abandoned.”

    In a flurry of statements that followed, both the city and City College looked for the silver lining. City College noted that the two institutions established a “strong on-going relationship during this process.” And Julie Wood from the mayor’s office essentially added that the show must go on. “We are in serious negotiations with several of the other applicants, each of whom has a game-changing project queued up. We look forward to announcing a winner soon.” That leaves the Cornell proposal with a team led by SOM as the only other contender for the Roosevelt Island site.

    Copyright © 2011 | The Architect's Newspaper, LLC

  2. #62
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
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    ^ and now...


    Cornell Gets $350 Million for NYC Campus

    By Oliver Staley and Henry Goldman

    Cornell University announced an anonymous $350 million gift to support its bid for a proposed engineering campus in New York City hours after Stanford University said it was pulling out of the competition.

    Cornell, based in Ithaca, New York, and Stanford were among 15 universities taking part in Mayor Michael Bloomberg’s competition to bring an engineering school to the city to create new companies and jobs. Stanford pulled out yesterday after failed negotiations with the city.

    Cornell, which has teamed with Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, has proposed a campus with 2 million square feet for almost 2,000 students on Roosevelt Island, one of the sites offered by the city. Bloomberg has offered universities around the world the right to compete to create a new engineering campus on city-owned land. New York plans to provide $100 million for infrastructure improvements at the site.

    “I am thankful and proud that this extraordinary individual gift will support Cornell’s goal to realize Mayor Bloomberg’s vision for New York City,” Cornell President David Skorton said yesterday in a statement.

    Cornell already has a medical school on the Upper East Side of Manhattan. In 2009, Sanford Weill, former chief executive officer of CitiGroup Inc., donated $170 million to that institution.

    Failed to Agree

    Stanford and New York officials failed to reach an agreement on a number of points, including whether the school could withdraw from the project without penalties, said a person familiar with some of the negotiations who wasn’t authorized to speak publicly. The impasse was partly a result of the different cultures and expectations of a private university and a major city, the person said.

    An earlier stumbling block over environmental liability was settled and not the reason for the withdrawal, the person said.

    The mayor invited proposals in July for the right to open a “world-class” campus for engineering and applied science, and on Oct. 27 he said he may award multiple winners. The project may generate $6 billion in economic activity with as many as 400 new companies and 22,000 permanent jobs in its first 30 years, Bloomberg said.

    Stanford, located near Palo Alto, California, had proposed a $2.5 billion campus on Roosevelt Island to be built over 30 years to house 200 professors and 2,000 students. The university planned to invest $100 million of its own money and embark on a 10-year fundraising campaign to build the campus. The university had announced a partnership with City College of New York, which would be its temporary home when it opened 2013.

    http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2011-1...withdraws.html

  3. #63
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    Stanford and New York officials failed to reach an agreement on a number of points, including whether the school could withdraw from the project without penalties


    Yeah.....


    Start a multi-million dollar expansion during a recession with no risk if you pull out?

    Even "academics" are not that naive.

  4. #64

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    So the city is putting up money to upgrade the infrastructure on RI. Will this include a new infill subway station on the E/M line?

  5. #65
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
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    Cornell Wins Contest for Science Campus on Roosevelt Island

    by Sara Polsky


    [Courtesy of Cornell University and Skidmore, Owings & Merrill.]

    A short three days after Stanford dropped out of the competition to build an applied sciences and engineering campus on Roosevelt Island, Cornell is to be announced as the winner today, the Journal, Times, Daily News and every other media outlet report. Cornell announced Friday that it had received a $350 million gift for the creation of the campus, which probably didn't hurt its case. (The city has promised the contest winner the Roosevelt Island land and $100 million.) Cornell's plan is for an SOM-designed campus with four acres of solar panels, 500 geothermal wells, and 2.1 million square feet of space for more than 2,000 students. Classes are set to start next fall.

    Cornell wins campus bid [WSJ]
    Bloomberg is said to pick Cornell for Science School [NYT]

    http://ny.curbed.com/archives/2011/1...elt_island.php

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    They should build a new elevator building to access the Quensboro bridge by foot or bike from Roosevelt Isl. I don't see why it would be so hard, it can be integrated into the new Cornell campus

  7. #67

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    Not good as a long term solution. An elevator going that high wouldn't move a large number of people.

    The distance from Manhattan to RI is only 100 feet greater than the Wards Island Bridge

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    Although disfiguring (IMO), a pedestrian bridge would be an excellent way to get people across. But at what cost? We're probably talking at least one hundred million dollars here. A bank of large capacity elevators in an integrated campus building would be the smarter choice. The marginal cost would be on the order of $10 million at the very most. I'm sure you've seen the elevators at Yankee Stadium on the first base side - 3 or 4 of those at Queensboro bridge would be extremely efficient

  9. #69
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    GG, Elevators break quite often.....especially exterior access ones.

    Putting them up there for public access would not be the best of solutions.

  10. #70
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    You're probably thinking of the clunkers on the A line in Washington heights, which is why I brought up the Yankee Stadium elevators. They are a model of efficiency and never break down, modern mass transport elevators are a very viable solution IMO. The ramp at the top could be covered to protect from the elements. They might even be able to fit a newstand up there to generate some rental income. Just a thought, seems like a waste to have no access to a bridge spanning right above the island

  11. #71
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    Actually, I was thinking more of elevators that were not quite as closely watched......

    I am not sure if they get special care because they are near Yankee Stadium, but the ones I was thinking about were the elevators that service the cliffs in Hoboken to get you to the Light Rail Station on 9th street.

    They are VERY sturdy, but even within a year they had the hell beaten out of them....


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  13. #73
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
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    Right idea, wrong place: Why Cornell’s high-tech campus belongs in the projects

    Roosevelt Island? Try public housing instead


    BY Roy Strickland


    Mariela Lombard
    Is this where a high-tech graduate campus belongs?

    Mayor Bloomberg’s international competition to bring a high-tech graduate school to the city is brilliant, and its potential to spur an in-town equivalent of Silicon Valley should be welcomed by all New Yorkers. But Roosevelt Island, the future location for the competition’s winner, Cornell University, is wrong. If a world-class campus is built there, New York will have lost the opportunity of a generation — to build the campus in New York City’s public housing projects.

    That’s right, the projects. With New York looking to become the new Silicon Valley, that’s where City Hall should build in the future.
    With their plentiful and underutilized open spaces, they can be the setting for dynamic relationships between town and gown. Here new laboratory buildings can thread among project towers and revitalize their surroundings.

    And because universities don’t just need Ph.D.s but also office and maintenance staff, here are job opportunities for project residents. Throw in a few K-12 schools, and project kids will have the chance for a seamless education all the way through graduate school, helping to strengthen families across generations (and nurture talents like Starbucks founder Howard Schultz, Hollywood entrepreneurs the Wayans brothers and Supreme Court Associate Justice Sonia Sotomayor, all of whom grew up in public housing).

    Do the projects have room? You bet. New York’s public housing often covers only 15% of its land, which leaves 85% open. At the time the projects went up, this was the cheap way to build: Fewer, taller buildings meant fewer expensive foundations to dig. And the spaces left behind are often 100- to 200-feet wide, ample enough for new buildings. (A University of Michigan study found space for up to 22 million square feet of construction in and around housing projects on the lower East Side. Cornell’s proposed campus? Two million square feet.)

    But a campus shouldn’t just be shoehorned into the projects. It should create a place that’s welcoming to both New Yorkers and the global academic and research community. Here’s how:

    • Go tall. If research and science are integral to the city’s future, mark them on the skyline.
    • Generate interesting shapes for campus buildings.
    • Where possible, cantilever or build platforms over project-adjacent infrastructure like the FDR Drive or uptown’s Park Ave train viaduct. That’s what Cornell Medical School already does along the East River.
    • Use terraces and roofs for gardens and playgrounds that integrate green design with neighborhood life.
    • At the ground level, put features like K-12 schools, libraries, recreation rooms and shops for easy public access.
    • Where possible, build new streets through the projects to better connect both housing and the campus to the city and promote social and economic exchanges.
    • Hire project residents to help maintain and run the campus.
    • Provide campus internships for city kids and get them started on creating the next Silicon Valley at an early age.

    Is this idea too outside the box? In Chelsea, a new, privately built apartment house is rising on a former parking lot in the Elliott-Chelsea Houses. In Harlem, a state-of-the-art charter school is going up on open land in the St. Nicholas Houses.

    These and other projects are examples of the Housing Authority’s efforts to maintain and enhance properties through public and private investment.

    Just think what a new Cornell could do.

    http://www.nydailynews.com/opinion/i...#ixzz1hGU4PqQU

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    Quote Originally Posted by Merry View Post
    Right idea, wrong place: Why Cornell’s high-tech campus belongs in the projects
    This reporter is why some people advocate for Eugenics

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    A future for Roosevelt Island, but what of transportation?

    By Benjamin Kabak

    Much like wide swaths of New York City outside of Manhattan south of 96th Street, Roosevelt Island has long been fetishized as a strange “other” amidst the urban life of New York City. Cut off from both Manhattan and Queens by water, the largely residential island with a few hospitals sits amidst the East River. The 59th St. Bridge passes over it, and only the F train, the Q0102 and a tram — how neat! — service the island. Its residents love it for its access and idyllic qualities amidst the hustle and bustle of the Big Apple.

    With the announcement earlier this week, though, of a brand new applied sciences campus run by Cornell University on the souther end of the two-mile landmass, life could change on Roosevelt Island. The school will start to open in 2017, and city officials expect it to be fully built out by 2027. The plans call for housing for 2500 students and another 280 faculty members, and the Economic Development Corp. says the campus alone will create 8000 new jobs. For an island with 12,000 residents, those totals represent a large influx of people.

    Already, transportation advocates are casting a wary eye on the project. In a lengthy press release on the campus, the word “transportation” appears just once, and it’s unclear at this stage how Cornell will improve accessibility to the southern part of the island. It’s a manageable half-mile walk from the F train, but that walk is a relatively long one compared with how close, say, Columbia, NYU and Fordham are to their nearest train stops.

    In a post yesterday, Cap’n Transit wondered how Roosevelt Island would remain relatively car-free. The infrastructure on the island can’t really support a huge influx of cars as it is even as the current hospital areas near where the campus will go up are relatively car-heavy. “Let’s hope,” the Cap’n writes, “that the Cornell and Technion designers have more vision than they showed in that lame fly-through, and that they build something urban and scholarly, with really narrow streets, like in Paris’s Latin Quarter. Let’s hope that they don’t think they’re too good to take the train to work, or at least to park at the Motorgate and take the bus. But if they do, let’s hope that Bloomberg, Steel and the RIOC will make them do the right thing.”

    One potential “right thing” could involve exploring a new subway stop for the island. The 53rd St. tunnel passes directly underneath what will be the southern end of the Cornell campus. There’s no station right now, and I have no idea if one is even technically or economically feasible. But it would serve to anchor the campus and would nearly eliminate the need to drive to Cornell-on-Roosevelt. Currently, while the F train itself at Roosevelt Island is very crowded, the station is only the 180th most popular. That figure is a bit deceptive though as the 37.6 percent increase in ridership from 2009 to 2010 was the second highest in the city. Over 2.5 million riders a year use the station, and that number will jump considerably with the campus.

    It is, at least, an idea. With the Cornell campus, the city could be sending upwards of 10,000 people a day to Roosevelt Island, and the transportation infrastructure improvements must be a part of the conversation before the project moves too far along. Will transit play the proper role or will it, as Stephen Smith worries, turn into yet another academic Corbusian nightmare in New York City?

    http://secondavenuesagas.com/2011/12...ransportation/

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