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Thread: Roosevelt Island

  1. #91
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
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    Taking shelter in CornellNYC Tech

    Roosevelt Islanders want to ride out the next storm on the $2 billion tech campus, saying it should be designed to be able to provide food, water and electricity for stranded residents.

    By Annie Karni

    After the northern tip and the western promenade of skinny Roosevelt Island flooded last month during Superstorm Sandy, community leaders brainstormed how to protect 14,000 residents, many of them elderly and disabled, from future natural disasters if evacuation proved impossible.

    Their solution: turn CornellNYC Tech, the $2 billion planned technology and applied sciences campus, whose first buildings are expected to open on Roosevelt Island in 2017, into a self-sustaining city—a place where residents could live for days without aid from the outside world.

    "We have a high disabled population and if we need to evacuate and it's not possible, people on respirators need to go somewhere where it's safe," said Ellen Polivy, president of the Roosevelt Island Community Coalition, a group of 33 member organizations that banded together to ease the town/gown relations. "Someplace where there is water for three days, electricity, food. If there's a storm, we want to figure out a way we can be at the Cornell campus."

    The city's Office of Emergency Management often recommends residents "shelter in place" during a disaster if evacuating is impossible. Being stranded is perhaps more likely to happen on the low-lying island than anywhere else in the city. It is accessible only by one subway line, one tram and one bridge to Queens.

    Ms. Polivy said islanders want Cornell's construction to incorporate amenities that would make it the go-to "shelter in place" for the community—a safe, enclosed place to weather a storm.
    Cornell officials said they were reviewing the request and also looking into expanding transportation options with ferries to and from the island.

    The university is already being designed with future storms in mind. Even before Sandy, plans were underway to raise the site above the floodplain by six or seven feet with materials from the demolished Goldwater Hospital, said Andrew Winters, director of capital projects and planning for CornellNYC Tech.

    "Based on the 100-year-flood plain, storm surges, global warming, it all leads to the conclusion that the required height is about 16 feet for elevation," Mr. Winters said. "We were already going to 20 or 21 feet pre-Sandy."

    The remaining question is whether the university can take on island residents in a crisis—a population that would dwarf the 2,500 students and 300 faculty members who will eventually inhabit the two-million square foot campus.

    "One thing that Sandy has done for us is that it put these sorts of issues in the forefront," Mr. Winters said.

    http://www.crainsnewyork.com/article...NOMY/121129936

  2. #92
    Chief Antagonist Ninjahedge's Avatar
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    So in order to build a college... it has to be a shelter?


    GMA (XXX) B

  3. #93

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    Curbed
    http://ny.curbed.com/archives/2013/1...s_revealed.php

    Cornell Tech's Glassy Green Roosevelt Island Campus Revealed

    Thursday, December 19, 2013, by Curbed Staff



    After finally getting the green light, Cornell just unleashed a slew of new renderings that show what its new Roosevelt Island tech campus will actually look like. At 2 million square feet, the glassy, sustainable, public-space-prioritizing project has tapped the brains of a long roster of respected city architects and firms: Morphosis' Pritzker Prize-winning Thom Mayne; Weiss/Manfredi Architecture; Handel Architects; and Skidmore Owings & Merrill. Peruse through the images below to get a feel for the designs of 1) the first academic building, with aspirations for net-zero energy use; 2) the "tech walk" or central campus plaza; 3) the corporate co-location building (which will have students working side-by-side with entrepreneurs and tech-industry professionals); and 4) the first residential building, set to hold 350 units. To give a sense of the import of the project in the eyes of the city, and how victorious arriving at this stage must feel like, Mayor Bloomberg himself appears in the explanatory video full of scalies.











    http://tech.cornell.edu/future-campus/

  4. #94
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    I don't like how the residential tower blocks the 59th Street Bridge when viewed from the south.

  5. #95
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
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    Roosevelt Islanders Not Smitten With Cornell's Campus Design



    The masterplan for Cornell's tech campus on Roosevelt Island won approval last spring, giving the university the green light for construction to begin this year. Even though all systems are go, Cornell is trying to be a good neighbor, so they're making an effort to keep the community informed. After revealing detailed designs for the first buildings last month, Cornell presented the updated plans for the first academic building (highlighted by the red arrow in the picture at right) to the community board last night.

    Designed by Thom Mayne of Morphosis Architects, the building features glazed glass on the first floor so that activity within the building can be seen from outside. Sustainability is key for the whole campus so while glass will make up 40 percent of the building, the rest will be solid materials to minimize heating and cooling needs. The whole thing will be topped by a solar panel array to help the building achieve net-zero energy usage. All of the architects and developers congratulated each other and tooted their own horns when the design were recently detailed, but the community wasn't so smitten.


    The first academic building. Rendering by Kilograph

    For all the school's modern touches, including an open floor plan designed for maximum "flexibility," the board pointed out a glaring omission: no audio induction looping for the hearing impaired outside of the public spaces on the first floor. Cornell previously promised to include audio loops, but they were left out of the updated plans. "What's especially frustrating is that this is a technology school," said one hearing-imparied board member. The American Disabilities Act requires new buildings to offer assisted listening systems in assembly areas or lecture spaces, so the systems will be added to all upper-level classrooms.


    Campus overview. First academic building at left. Rendering by Kilograph

    Another sticking point was the landscaping. Longtime resident Judy Berdy was saddened by the proposed removal of the vast majority of trees currently on the site, particularly on the northern end. She gave an impassioned plea for the architects to "go back to the drawing board" and reconsider whether all those trees needed to be removed. Community members met her comments with a smattering of applause, and the board voted to include tree preservation as a condition for approval of the academic building plans.


    Slides showing the proposed facade materials for the Central Utility Plant

    Plans were also presented for the renewal energy Central Utility Plant or CUP, which will be used by Con Edison and select members of the Cornell community. Since Con Edison requires the building to be opaque, the plan is to create a secondary façade around the building with dark rust-colored panels that are slanted to provide different perspectives and create "rhythm." But residents thought the paneling was too dark and "much more stark than that being proposed for the other buildings." Berdy felt the material would detract from the "open campus" feel the architects were going for. The board approved CUP on the condition that they change the façade and provide sufficient off-street access to the equipment vans that would be entering the building.


    Slides showing the inspiration for the CUP facade materials

    Several board members felt that there was a lack of cohesiveness to the plans; the buildings are being designed by different architectural firms—Thom Mayne of Morphosis Architects designed the first academic building, while Weiss Manfredi is creating the corporate co-location building— on different construction schedules. Even something as relatively simple as garbage disposal became problematic because of the various architects on the project.


    First academic building at right. Rendering by Kilograph

    Initially, board members claimed they were told that all the university's garbage was supposed to go to a central location on campus to minimize truck traffic on the island. While the first academic building does have one location in the cellar—designed to decrease organic waste by 95 percent through the use of a pulper and dehydrator—there is no specified place for all the University's waste because some of the plans for future buildings are still being created by other architectural firms. Despite the objections, plans the campus will proceed, and Cornell Tech will break ground later this year.

    —Kizzy Cox

    http://ny.curbed.com/archives/2014/0...pus_design.php

  6. #96
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    I just want to see an elevator/staircase built to the pedestrian walkway on the bridge

  7. #97
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
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    ^ I'm really surprised that this wasn't done a long time ago, after this:

    Between 1930 and 1955, there was a vehicular elevator to transport cars and passengers to and from Welfare Island, now known as Roosevelt Island. This was demolished in 1970.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Queensboro_Bridge

    Do you walk/have you walked across the bridge much, GG? I imagine it would be quite an interesting visual experience.


  8. #98

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    Quote Originally Posted by Merry View Post
    ^ I'm really surprised that this wasn't done a long time ago, after this:
    The issue of an elevator/stairway came up several years ago when the RI bridge was stuck open and coincidentally, the tram was down for maintenance. There were concerns about emergency services.

    The elevator was installed during the time there was a subway stop on the bridge.

    To put in an elevator, one traffic lane would have to be removed. To justify that loss, you have to consider how much foot traffic an elevator would generate. Forget the stairs, it's 150 feet.

    The idea was dropped.

  9. #99
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    There's no reason to remove any lane. All you need is a building that abuts the bridge and a short plank brindge

  10. #100

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    Do you know that for a fact? I remember there was a big CB meeting about this.

    Anyway, how much use will it get? And how often will it break down?

    I think the money would be better spent on a ferry dock.

    EDIT: "A building that abuts the bridge" would be denied. It's a landmark.
    Last edited by ZippyTheChimp; January 12th, 2014 at 04:22 PM.

  11. #101
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
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    Roosevelt Island's Goldwater Hospital Is Now See-Through

    by Hana R. Alberts


    Photos via Roosevelt Islander.

    First there was a hospital, and now there isn't, really. Well, a shell of one. Roosevelt Island's Goldwater Hospital is in the process of getting razed to make way for Cornell's new tech campus on the southern half of Roosevelt Island. The enormous facility once held 2,106 beds, and was known for architecture that was intended to facilitate healing as much as formal medication did. The Roosevelt Islander blog captured a few images of the teardown, noting that Cornell's official construction updates say that no explosives or a wrecking ball will be used. A large excavator will tear down the facade together with a shearing machine, which cuts through steel beams. Photographer Charles Giraudet, who chronicled the empty hospital in thousands of photos, must be pretty bummed.



    Roosevelt Island Cornell NYC Tech Structural Demolition Of Goldwater Hospital About To Begin [Islander]

  12. #102
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    I disagree, that architecture was a piece of crap. Good riddance

  13. #103
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
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    Quiet Island, With Change Coming

    The Quiet Manhattan: Roosevelt Island

    By AILEEN JACOBSON



    Slide Show

    When Yarin and Talia Katz first came to the United States from Israel, they spent a year sampling various parts of New York City and New Jersey with monthly rentals. In 2011, when they were ready to settle down, Mr. Katz said, “We pretty much knew we wanted to move to Roosevelt Island.”

    The commute to Manhattan’s diamond district, where they both work, takes 10 to 15 minutes on the F train, he said. “We like the commute, the atmosphere, the green, the parks, the water. And the quiet of the place. There are not a lot of cars.” Their year-old son, Thomas, attends a day care center near the tram, the other direct transportation to Manhattan.

    “It’s like a suburb in the city,” said Corinne Volpe, an agent with Sotheby’s International Realty who has lived on the island since 2006. Formerly an Upper East Side resident, she said, she was attracted by the “knock-your-socks-off views” from nearly every spot on the island, which is 800 feet across at its widest and two miles long. She and her husband were also impressed by the lack of city sounds. “It’s so quiet, it’s eerie,” she said.


    415 MAIN STREET, #5A A two-bedroom two-bath condominium with city and bridge views and
    rooftop terrace, listed at $1.2 million. Ruth Fremson/The New York Times

    But change is coming to this island, which is technically part of Manhattan (though leased by the state through 2068) and parallels its shoreline from around East 46th to East 85th Streets. A technology campus called Cornell Tech is being built on a 12-acre site by Cornell University, in an academic partnership with the Technion-Israel Institute of Technology in Haifa. A hospital that stood there is being demolished, and four new buildings, including a residence for students and faculty, are to open in 2017, with more to come. The project is currently scheduled for completion in 2043.

    Separately, a residential building from private developers is going up, and two more are planned. Also, a subsidy program that has kept many rents and co-op prices under market rates is running out on several buildings.

    Ms. Volpe sees the new developments as “a golden age,” with more inhabitants stimulating added amenities, perhaps a movie theater. Others are ambivalent.

    Judith Berdy, who arrived in 1977 and is now the president of the Roosevelt Island Historical Society, said she always liked the island’s ethnic and economic diversity, much of it fostered by the Mitchell-Lama affordable-housing program. Her one-bedroom co-op, for which she paid $26,000 in 2005, is leaving the program, which means she could sell her apartment for “somewhere over half a million,” she said. “But I ain’t goin’ nowhere.” On the downside, she said, “when they privatize these buildings, we’ll get only rich people. We’ll lose the diversity.”

    Rossana Ceruzzi, a teacher and translator, moved to the island in 2001 and soon discovered, she said, that the green spaces reminded her of her grandmother’s farm in Italy. She started taking care of animals, and, she said, “I am now in the process of forming my own wildlife organization.” The building where she rents a one-bedroom apartment for about $1,400 a month is in the early stages of going co-op, she said, but purchase, maintenance and new rental prices have not yet been released. “I plan to stay so far, unless they force me out,” she said. “It’s a paradise.”

    What You’ll Find

    Before residential development began in the 1970s, Roosevelt Island, which had a series of names, was home to several institutions, including a penitentiary and the New York City Lunatic Asylum. The prison is gone, but in 2006 the former asylum’s atrium became the lobby of a 500-unit apartment building called the Octagon.

    It is on the northern side of the island, near a park and an 1872 lighthouse that was designed by James Renwick Jr. (who also designed St. Patrick’s Cathedral). The southern tip of the island is occupied by a park dedicated to Franklin D. Roosevelt, after whom the island was named in 1971. Promenades for walking or bicycling line the island’s perimeter.

    There is only one main thoroughfare, Main Street. Parks, gardens and playing fields are scattered among the high-rises where most of the island’s roughly 12,000 residents live. Some work for the United Nations, which affords an easy commute.

    A parking garage called Motorgate must be used for most cars, and a free bus takes people around. Trash is gathered through underground vacuum tubes, so no sanitation trucks rumble about. Stores and restaurants are concentrated in two areas, Shops on Main and Riverwalk Commons.


    425 MAIN STREET, #7S A two-bedroom two-bath condominium with views and washer/dryer,
    listed at $1,060,000. Ruth Fremson/The New York Times

    The building of Cornell Tech has caused consternation among some residents, said Ellen Polivy, co-chairwoman of the Roosevelt Island Community Coalition, which represents 37 groups. “The biggest concern is about trucking and air quality,” she said. Cornell has agreed to barge much of the material in and out, and has been “respectful and responsible so far.” However, she said, her group continues to worry about the effects of trucks and extra cars on air quality and on parking. The overburdening of busy commuter routes is another issue, she said.

    What You’ll Pay

    Rentals are more common than sales, with a recent search revealing 28 rentals, including one-bedrooms for less than $2,000 a month and a four-bedroom unit at $4,495. Six homes were available for sale.

    Though the sample is small, sale prices “are definitely going up,” said Elena Sarkissian, an agent for Douglas Elliman Real Estate, who compared last year’s sales through mid-October to this year’s. During the 2013 period, one one-bedroom apartment closed at $695,000, while this year eight closed at an average of $766,688, an increase of 10.3 percent. Four two-bedroom apartments sold this year at an average of $1,060,000, compared with last year’s five sales at an average of $893,313, Ms. Sarkissian said, for an 18.7 percent rise. No studios traded either year. In the 2013 period, eight three-bedroom apartments sold at an average price of $1.386 million, but none have sold so far this year.

    All the sales were condominiums, though three co-ops are now on the market, ranging in price from $495,000 to $949,000 and all at 531 Main Street, which has just emerged from Mitchell-Lama rules.


    531 MAIN STREET, #617 A one-bedroom one-bath co-op in a doorman building with an indoor pool,
    listed at $495,000. Ruth Fremson/The New York Times

    What to Do


    A farmers market takes place on Saturday mornings near the ramp of the Roosevelt Island Bridge to Queens. The Roosevelt Island Library hosts films and book discussions, among other happenings, and the Roosevelt Island Visual Art Association organizes art exhibitions and musical events. The Sportspark includes an indoor pool, a basketball court, a ping-pong room and fitness classes. Indoor and outdoor tennis courts dot the island.

    The Schools

    Public School/Intermediate School 217 is the only public school on the island. It has about 540 students, in prekindergarten through Grade 8, representing more than 60 countries in their backgrounds, said Mandana Beckman, the principal. A Gifted and Talented program started five years ago. The school received a B on its most recent report card but is constantly improving, she said. This year, Cornell Tech started an after-school computer program.

    The Commute

    From the island’s only subway stop, the F train takes about 10 minutes to reach Rockefeller Center. The Roosevelt Island Tram, the only other direct route to Manhattan, takes about four minutes to cross the East River; it stops at Second Avenue, between 59th and 60th Streets, and uses Metrocards.

    Vehicles from Manhattan must drive over the Queensboro Bridge and take local roads to the Roosevelt Island Bridge. The Q102 bus makes stops on the i

    The History

    From 1916 to 1957, a trolley that ran across the Queensboro Bridge stopped mid-bridge so passengers could alight on the island, said Judith Berdy, the historical society president. They descended by elevators inside a nine-story storehouse. To board the trolley, passengers entered kiosks in Manhattan or Queens. In 2007, the society moved and restored one of those terra-cotta structures, opening it as a visitor center on the site of the storehouse, demolished in 1970 to make way for the tram.

    http://www.nytimes.com/2014/11/09/re...s&emc=rss&_r=0

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