Results 1 to 12 of 12

Thread: 75-1/2 Bedford Street - West Village - Narrowest House in NYC

  1. #1
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    7,476

    Default 75-1/2 Bedford Street - West Village - Narrowest House in NYC

    Skinniest house in New York City will cost you fat price of $2.75 million

    BY Bill Hutchinson

    August 26th 2009


    The city's skinniest house, 75 1/2 Bedford St. in West Village, is listed for sale for $2.75M. The home's interior is slightly more than 8-feet wide.


    It was built in 1873, squeezed between 75 and 77 Bedford St.

    The skinniest house in New York City is on the market for a fat price.
    The 9-1/2-feet-wide townhouse at 75-1/2 Bedford St. in the West Village was put up for sale this week for an asking price of $2.75 million, or $2,777 a square foot.

    "It's a legendary house because it's the narrowest house in New York and it's got a lot of lore," said Alex Nicholas, the Corcoran real estate broker who is handling the listing.

    Nicholas said he'll begin showing the three-story, 990-square-foot house next week.

    He is confident he'll get the big-bucks asking price even in the soft real estate market.

    "It's a unique space - one of a kind," Nicholas said.

    Built in 1873, the diminutive house is squeezed between 75 and 77 Bedford St. and has been home to a who's-who list of luminaries, including anthropologist Margaret Mead and Pulitzer Prize-winning poet Edna St. Vincent Millay.

    Author Ann McGovern lived there briefly and the red-brick house inspired her to co-write the novel "Mr. Skinner's Skinny House."

    Corcoran's Web site claims that actors Cary Grant and John Barrymore also once called the thin house home.

    The interior of the house is only 8-1/2-feet wide and 42-feet long and has a trapdoor in the kitchen floor that leads to a finished basement.
    At the rear of the house are floor-to-ceiling French doors on the first and second floor that open onto a tree-shaded back yard that is shared with neighbors.

    With a garret skylight on the third floor and oversized windows the house boasts an abundance of natural light.

    "It has a great sense of air," said Nicholas. "It doesn't feel like you're in the city."

    Real estate records show the current owner, Steven Balsamo, purchased the house in 2000 for $1.6 million from Christopher Dubs, an architecture preservationist.

    Dubs bought the house in 1994 for $270,000 and spent about $200,000 fixing it.

  2. #2
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    7,476

    Default

    HOME FOR NARROW MINDED

    SKINNIEST HOUSE FOR SALE

    By JEREMY OLSHAN



    TOO RICH, TOO THIN? This 9 1 / 2 -foot-wide townhouse -- 75 1 / 2 Bedford St. in the Village -- is on sale for a hefty sum. Acting legends John Barrymore and Cary Grant (inset) both slept here.

    You have to be pretty skinny to fit into this address.

    At 9½ feet wide, it's the narrowest house in Manhattan. But given that it's located in the heart of Greenwich Village and has been home to famous artists and writers, it will take a fat wallet to purchase this sliver of real estate.

    On the market for the first time since 2000, 75½ Bedford St. was just put up for sale for $2.75 million -- a million dollars more than it was purchased for and nearly 10 times its asking price of two decades ago.

    "This is a place for someone who wants a bit of history, charm, and, well, uniqueness," Alex Nicholas, real-estate broker for the Corcoran Group, told The Post. "But when you have the narrowest house in all New York, you'll always be newsworthy."

    Indeed, the 1,500-square-foot townhouse made headlines when it was sold in 1943, 1982, and 2000.

    It's the kind of real estate that tourists and native New Yorkers cannot help but gawk at as they pass by, Nicholas said.

    Owner Stephen Balsamo, who never lived at the house as his primary residence, renovated the 1873 home to maximize its space.

    In the kitchen, a custom stove has all four burners in a single row, rather than the usual two-by-two arrangement. The three floors are all open, but the balconies overlooking the garden were extended, adding depth to make up for lack of width.

    Among the luminaries who have lived in the tiny town house are Pulitzer Prize winner Edna St. Vin cent Millay. Accord ing to legend, ac tors Cary Grant and John Barry more are also said to have slept be tween its narrow walls.

    Visitors to the home expect to find it dark and claustro phobic, but as a result of the sweeping windows in the back, "every floor has amazing light," Nicholas said.

    "On the top floor, there's a huge skylight," he said. "This is old-world charm that's very bright."

    Nicholas would not say how many buyers have expressed interest in the property since it went on sale this week. But all indications are that the market for skinny homes is not contracting, he said.

    http://www.nypost.com/seven/08262009...ded_186560.htm

  3. #3
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    7,476

    Default

    Real Estate Mysteries: The skinny on the skinniest house in the city

    75 1/2 Bedford Street was once home to Edna St. Vincent Millay and other famous names

    February 05, 2008

    By Katherine Dykstra


    75 1/2 Bedford Street

    The narrowest house in the city, a townhouse at 75½ Bedford Street, is so slim that one may wonder how this tiny slip of a building came into being – and why it still remains.

    Wedged between 75 and 77 Bedford, 75½ is only nine-and-a-half-feet wide on the outside, eight-and-a-half-feet wide on the inside, and 32 feet deep.

    The home's precise date of construction is in question, but one thing is certain: This itty-bitty home has drawn a long list of famous inhabitants.

    The home was constructed in the mid-1800s over a carriage drive between two homes that led to horse stables in the backyard.

    It is believed to have been built in 1873, but there are some who say that based on land values and on the home's original architectural style, Italiante, it is more in line with 1850s construction.

    The list of former owners and renters reads like a who's who of New York. There's the cartoonist William Steig, the anthropologist Margaret Mead and the writer Ann McGovern, who co-authored a book called "Mr. Skinner's Skinny House" about a man who lives in the narrowest house in the city.

    It is also rumored that both Cary Grant and John Barrymore spent time there. And during the early 1920s, when artists began to flock to Greenwich Village, the home became an enclave for the pioneers who started the Cherry Lane Theater.

    But the home's most notable resident, and the name etched into the plaque on its façade, is Edna St. Vincent Millay, the Pulitzer Prize-winning poet. Millay won her Pulitzer in 1923, for "The Harp-Weaver and Other Poems," while she was living in the house. She was the first woman to win the prize for poetry.

    It was Millay and her Dutch husband, Eugen Jan Boissevain, who had the home renovated from the Italiante to the Dutch Colonial style in the 1920s. During their short stint in the home, they added the casement windows, skylight and Dutch stepped gable that passersby see today.

    In the 1950s, a family with the last name Carroad purchased the home along with a couple of the properties around it. The family owned it until the early 1990s.

    That was when Christopher Dubs, who has a background in architecture preservation, discovered it. Though the home was in disrepair, Dubs was intrigued, and in 1994 he bought it for $270,000.

    "It was an old, ugly 1960s renovation that someone had done," said Dubs. "It had red mosaic tile and a horrible kitchen and all these little chopped up rooms upstairs."

    Dubs had yet to start work on the house when Mayor David Dinkins came to recognize the building as the one-time home of Millay.

    "The mayor came and they're standing in front of it, and it was horrible," said Dubs. "We put the plaque on the ugly brick facing."

    The big repairs—fixing the plumbing and getting the heat up and running—were made immediately so Dubs could rent it out. The "full cosmetic," as he called it, came a few years later when he was able to devote the necessary time.

    What he imagined would take two weeks—each of the four floors, including the basement, measures less than 300 square feet—turned into a four-month adventure.

    "Once you touched one thing, you had to do the next thing," Dubs said.

    Complicating matters was the fact that the house is in a landmark district, so Dubs had to get permission from the city to make the changes he wanted. And he needed to keep the home's appearance consistent with the time period.

    That meant finding bricks circa 1920 when it came time to repoint the façade. He found them in a Long Island brickyard. Inside, he exposed the natural beams in the ceiling, replastered the walls, and installed old French doors and Juliet wrought-iron balconies in the back.

    On the main floor he swapped the kitchen with the den and put a stove in one fireplace (the house has five of them) with four burners in a row, rather than the standard two-by-two configuration in order to save space.

    "I knew how important space was, and in that house that was elevated to a whole other level," says Dubs.

    When he finished his renovations, which cost him $200,000, he was able to rent the house out for $6,000 a month. And, in 2000, he sold it for $1.6 million, nearly quadrupling the investment he made to buy it and fix it up.

    "We had multiple offers. In fact, if I remember right, we had a bidding war on it," said Ileen Shoenfeld of Brown Harris Stevens, who represented Dubs. "This house was very unique. And its uniqueness made it very desirable."

    "There was a bidding war," said Patrick Lilly, senior managing director at Coldwell Banker, which represented Steven Balsamo, who ended up purchasing the house. Propertyshark.com records indicate that Balsamo still owns it. Calls to confirm this information were not immediately returned.

    Lilly, who has worked in the West Village for 24 years and who specializes in townhouses, estimates that 75½ Bedford Street is now worth about $2.5 million.

    "The designer buildings are going for a little over $2,000 a square foot, so $2,500 is about as high as you can get in the Village," he said. "There was a Halstead deal on another small house that was 1,700 square feet, and that went for over $3 million. This one is 990 square feet."

    The price paid for 75½ Bedford Street is "because of its size and its pedigree and its uniqueness," said Lilly. "You're always going to pay a premium for uniqueness."

    http://therealdeal.com/newyork/articles/8896

  4. #4

    Default

    We need more of these.

    Obviously, it makes sense to the real estate community.

    Look at the price.

  5. #5
    Moderator NYatKNIGHT's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Manhattan - South Village
    Posts
    4,240

    Default

    It's in a really great area too. Nice one, Merry.

  6. #6

    Default

    Believe it or not I actually live in an Edwardian apartment building in Australia that is about the same width !

    And many of the Victorian terrace houses in the inner suburbs of Melbourne are this size or even smaller.

  7. #7
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    7,476

    Default

    ^ Welcome to the forum, fellow Aussie .

    A couple more interior shots:



    Mmmm (?)...

    "...Seriously. We want to know who you think would be perfect for this apartment. We'll get you started with some guesses:

    1. Mayor Bloomberg, if he ever breaks up with that relative giantess he is dating.
    2. David Blaine (what, like he needs space?).
    3. The Olsen twins.
    4. The entire cast of 90210.
    5. Bernie Madoff's penis.

    We're betting those five could afford it, at least. That is, if the 90210 cast all chips in together with the money they've been saving by not eating food, and Bernie's wang drains his account in Grand Cayman."

    http://nymag.com/daily/intel/2009/08...townhouse.html

  8. #8
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    7,476

    Default

    Skinniest House Loses a Few

    October 1, 2009, by Sara



    75 1/2 Bedford Street, the narrowest house in New York City, exploded onto the market a month ago with a price tag of $2.75 million for 990 square feet. The city waited with baited breath and offers of $10,000 in free IKEA furniture, but the house did not sell. And now! The mid-nineteenth-century house has gotten a 9 percent price cut (and a few new listing photos), for a new ask of $2,499,000. Once occupied by Edna St. Vincent Millay and, rumor has it, Cary Grant and John Barrymore, it last sold for $1.6 million in 2000.

    Listing: 75.5 Bedford [Corcoran]
    CurbedWire: Narrow House Gets Free Ikea [Curbed]
    On the Market: NYC's Narrowest House [Curbed]

    http://curbed.com/archives/2009/10/0...oses_a_few.php

  9. #9
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    7,476

    Default

    Narrowest House Sells for $2.175 Million

    January 12, 2010, by Sara



    The sale of 75 1/2 Bedford Street, NYC's skinniest house, has made it to public record. The nine-and-half-foot-wide house of indeterminate mid-1800s construction date was asking $2.75 million when it hit the market at the end of August, and it saw one chop to $2.499 million before it found a buyer. That buyer's identifying information is sadly obscured behind a corporation (with, clue, a P.O. Box in South Florida), but we do at least now know the 999-square-foot property's final sales price: $2.175 million. A profit for seller Stephen Balsamo, who paid $1.6 million for the house -- after a bidding war -- back in 2000. And a bit of a deal for the buyer, who got a roughly 13 percent discount off the most recent asking price. (More of a deal considering an early '08 estimate that pegged the value of the house at $2.5 million.)


    Listing: 75.5 Bedford [Corcoran]
    Recorded Sale for 75 1/2 Bedford Street [StreetEasy]
    75 1/2 Bedford Street coverage [Curbed]

    http://curbed.com/archives/2010/01/1...75_million.php

  10. #10

    Default

    On the Market: NYC's Narrowest House Returns to Market Asking $4.3 Million





    Curbed NY - 3 days ago


    Click here to view the full photogallery.


    "The half is back!" proclaimed an excited e-mail from a tipster this morning. And indeed it is: 75 1/2 Bedford Street, NYC's skinniest house, is back on the market. Dramatic price increases with each flip attempt are nothing new for the townhouse, which sold for $1.6 million in 2000, was asking $2.75 million in 2009, and found a buyer willing to pay $2.175 million in early 2010. Even so, the new price is a whopper at $4.3 million. Part of the draw is the boldface names that have been associated with the house over the years, including Cary Grant, John Barrymore, poet Edna St. Vincent Millay, and anthropologist Margaret Mead. This time there's one other factor: the 990-square-foot house just got renovated!

    The mid-1800s house—a 3BR, 2BA—has just been "meticulously restored," according to the brokerbabble. Now the inside looks something like this:
    Flooring throughout is reclaimed rift and quarter-sawn antique oak. The beautifully appointed kitchen features white oak cabinetry, custom millwork, Crema Ella Italian marble countertops and backsplash. The windowed master bath, with a balcony overlooking the planted garden, is exquisitely designed with a claw foot tub, separate shower, mosaic tiles, Italian marble and English Lefroy Brooks fixtures. Each fireplace is framed with natural Travertine marble. All of these modern conveniences have been seamlessly integrated, including central air, washer/dryer and new radiators throughout. The 2nd bath features Dolomite and Calacatta marble.
    The listing photos don't show much of the home's new look, but check out what there is in the gallery above. For comparison, here's a pre-renovation peek from the old listing:


    http://beta.local.yahoo.com/market-n...?woeid=2517895

  11. #11
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    7,476

    Default

    NYC's Narrowest House Has a Surprisingly Big Backyard

    June 20, 2011, by Sara Polsky











    (more exterior and interior pics)

    New York City's narrowest house, 75 1/2 Bedford Street, came back on the market last month—after selling in early 2010 for $2.175 million—at the dramatically increased price of $4.3 million. The most recent buyer gave the nine-and-a-half-foot-wide house a thorough renovation, with reclaimed oak flooring, custom cabinetry, and built-in shelving and storage space. But there's one feature the owner didn't need to change: the home's secret garden, a backyard it shares with two neighboring townhouses. The garden also has a side entrance so 75 1/2 Bedford's residents can avoid the camera-toting tourists out front. Since we spotted two tour groups and a few other folks with cameras wandering by just during our brief visit (chronicled in the gallery above), that might be the garden's most valuable feature.

    Each townhouse owner is responsible for caring for his/her own portion of the garden, but any big changes would have to be approved by all. So even though one owner has drawn up plans to partition the shared space, it seems unlikely to happen. That means whoever picks up 75 1/2 Bedford next will be able to look out across the whole garden from the tub, a setup that was one of our favorite features of the renovation. Each floor also has a balcony that lifts up to allow for a fire escape—another good idea, considering that burn marks from past fires are still visible on the old ceiling beams.

    As for the 990-square-foot interior, the built-in storage and furniture—including a kitchen bench and a Murphy bed—make the place seem surprisingly livable, for a buyer who doesn't mind tourists outside, sharp corners on the stairs, or paying $4.3 million for both of the above.

    75.5 Bedford Street [Town]

    http://ny.curbed.com/archives/2011/0...g_backyard.php

  12. #12
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    7,476

    Default

    New York City's Narrowest House Finds a Buyer at Last

    by Sara Polsky





    The house at 75 1/2 Bedford Street has the advantage of being New York City's narrowest house, with a secret garden, lots of celebrity history—Cary Grant, John Barrymore, Edna St. Vincent Millay, and Margaret Mead are among those who've called the place home—and a tendency to reach for the stars when it comes to asking prices. The home sold for $2.175 million in early 2010, had a thorough renovation, and returned to market asking $4.3 million. Numerous PriceChops followed, taking the ask all the way down to $3.495 million in mid-2012. After a vacation from the market and a return at the same price, the property is now listed as in contract. We'll be very curious to see what it actually sells for.



    Listing: 75.5 Bedford Street [Town via StreetEasy]

    http://ny.curbed.com/archives/2013/0...er_at_last.php

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 383
    Last Post: July 21st, 2012, 01:38 PM
  2. A Prickly Mason-Dixon Line in the Village
    By Kris in forum New York City Guide For New Yorkers
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: April 22nd, 2008, 07:08 PM
  3. The Zebra at 420 West 42nd Street
    By Edward in forum New York Real Estate
    Replies: 23
    Last Post: August 30th, 2007, 01:28 PM
  4. The House Filmgoers Love to Hate
    By ZippyTheChimp in forum New York City Guide For Visitors
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: August 11th, 2003, 12:16 PM
  5. Carnegie Mews - 211 West 56th Street
    By noharmony in forum New York Real Estate
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: December 19th, 2001, 10:14 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  


Google+ - Facebook - Twitter - Meetup

Edward's photos on Flickr - Wired New York on Flickr - In Queens - In Red Hook - Bryant Park - SQL Backup Software