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Thread: 7 Train Extension

  1. #301

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    Quote Originally Posted by BrooklynRider View Post
    Ultimately, this new line is only providing a connection. Not a new destination.
    Not sure what you mean by this.

    The purpose of the extension is to provide subway service to the railyards - that's the destination. The connection to the grid is at Grand Central. It would be nice if the line connected to Penn Station, but I think it would be a waste of resources when measured against other options.

    Additional stations (I had hoped for two) would have been a boon to further development.
    There should be a station at 42nd and 10th, but two? Where?

    Quote Originally Posted by Noyoka
    When you think about the City's commercial skyscraper construction they all occur where a number of subways converge.
    True, but although the railyards is a big project, it's puny compared to the Midtown and Downtown CBD's. You have to look at total floor space and population vs transportation capacity. I doubt the far west side will develop into a large commercial district; more likely residential development. People are more willing to walk from home to the subway than from work to the subway.

    Will the #7 be enough? Probably not. The solution would be a big project. Look at a subway map and it's obvious that a north-south line is needed on the west side. A line from the IRT at Broadway and 72nd, down Amsterdam-10th Ave to 23rd would be nice, but that's 2 miles of tunnel.

    The #7 is positioned to be extended in the future; the tunnel ends at 26th st, and the access shaft for TBM's will remain. I see two choices:

    A station at 23rd, south along 10th to 14th St to connect to the L.

    A station at 23rd, east along 23rd. A tunnel the same length as the one being constructed would take it to Madison Sq.

  2. #302
    Forum Veteran Tectonic's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ZippyTheChimp View Post
    Will the #7 be enough? Probably not. The solution would be a big project. Look at a subway map and it's obvious that a north-south line is needed on the west side. A line from the IRT at Broadway and 72nd, down Amsterdam-10th Ave to 23rd would be nice, but that's 2 miles of tunnel.

    The #7 is positioned to be extended in the future; the tunnel ends at 26th st, and the access shaft for TBM's will remain. I see two choices:

    A station at 23rd, south along 10th to 14th St to connect to the L.
    I agree, I think there is strain building on the #1 line which always seems crowded.

  3. #303
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    Crain's
    February 16, 2010 3:52 PM

    Outcry emerges for 41st St. stop on new 7-line

    Construction industry and powerful real estate group launch effort, including Web-based petition, to support the construction of the once-proposed station.

    The real estate and construction industries have started a full-court press, including a Web-based petition, to resurrect plans to build a stop at West 41st and Ninth Avenue for the extension of the No. 7 train line.

    Over the weekend, the Real Estate Board of New York launched a Web site http://www.BuildTheStation.com so people could sign a petition to encourage elected officials to finance the stop. Currently, the line will only include one new stop, at West 34th Street. This week, both residential and commercial brokers are expected to ask tenants in buildings on the far West side near West 42nd Street to sign petitions.

    There were plans to build a shell for a station on West 41st Street and then go back and build out the stop. However, a couple of months ago, plans to build the shell were abandoned.

    Steven Spinola, president of REBNY, says a lot of area residents don't even know the plan to build the shell have been abandoned so the petition is an attempt to raise awareness and spur people to contact local officials.

    “We've been told it would cost a lot more money to go back and build the station later,” Mr. Spinola said.

  4. #304

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    ^ Must be done ^

  5. #305
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    I just signed the petition.

    I urge everyone else to do so, also.

  6. #306
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    I signed it as well.

  7. #307
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    Default I did too

    but they sure as hell did not get my ph#!

  8. #308
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
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    Push Begins for 2nd Stop on No. 7 Subway Extension

    By CHARLES V. BAGLI

    More than two years ago, the Metropolitan Transportation Authority and the city concluded that there was enough money for only one new station on the extension of the No. 7 line, at 34th Street and 11th Avenue.

    Plans for a second station, at 10th Avenue and 41st Street, were shelved. But now that the tunnel boring machines have chewed through 10 blocks, the real estate industry wants the second station built.

    Fresh off a victorious effort to persuade the federal government to move the Khalid Shaikh Mohammed trial from New York City, the Real Estate Board of New York, the powerful lobbying arm of the industry, has turned its attention to the missing link in the No. 7 line. This week it started a Web site (BuildTheStation.com), a petition drive and a lobbying campaign to press the Obama administration to come up with hundreds of millions of dollars to pay for the station.

    “We think it should have two stops,” said Steven Spinola, president of the Real Estate Board. “There is substantial growth already taking place near 10th and 41st. For them to quietly let the station evaporate, without anyone telling anybody, is a mistake.”

    The station’s status is not exactly news, however. City and transit authority officials say that the station was eliminated from the plans more than two years ago, and it was not a secret. There were newspaper articles and protests by elected officials, including Senator Charles E. Schumer and Representative Jerrold Nadler. The city and the authority did retain an “option” with its construction contractor to build the second station, but that expired in September 2008.

    For now, the plan is to continue to cut a tunnel from 34th and 11th to the current No. 7 terminus at Times Square. The tunnel will pass by 41st and 10th, where the second station was to be built.

    The subway extension, scheduled to be finished at the end of 2013, is a major element of the Bloomberg administration’s signature project: turning the West Side into the city’s newest residential and commercial district. Promoters said the subway would bring public transit to the windswept neighborhood and ignite high-rise development where warehouses, factories and parking lots once stood.

    Mr. Spinola said developers like Joseph Moinian and Larry Silverstein and tenants in some of the new towers on 42nd Street had long understood that the station would be built. The board, in fact, is so eager to see plans for it resurrected in these financially trying times that it says local landlords may be willing to provide some cash, say $50 million of the $800 million cost.

    “It was hard to believe that tunnel would go right through the station but there’d be no station,” said Mary Ann Tighe, chairwoman of the Real Estate Board.

    Ms. Tighe said the station was a perfect shovel-ready project for federal money earmarked for infrastructure projects. She is working with Mr. Schumer.

    On Tuesday, Mr. Schumer said, “Everyone involved should jump at the opportunity to create a second stop at 41st and 10th, which would open a portion of Manhattan that is ripe for development.”

    But not all landlords are up in arms about the omission. Unlike commercial developers, residential developers on the West Side have long said the subway extension was a good idea but not critical to their success.

    “It helps residential guys,” said Tom Elghanayan, chairman of TF Cornerstone. “But if it’s not built, it’d be fatal for commercial development.

    That means no office development in that part of town.”

    Cornerstone recently completed and leased a building with 395 apartments on the east side of 10th Avenue, between 37th and 38th Streets. It is now finishing a two-tower building on the west side of the avenue with 865 apartments.

    The second station would be on land at 41st Street and 10th Avenue where Related Companies is erecting a large residential tower. “I’m not slowing my building down for it,” said Related’s chief executive, Stephen M. Ross. “We were told there’s no money around at all. God knows, the M.T.A. doesn’t have any money.”

    The other station, at 34th and 11th Avenue, is key to another proposed Related project: a $15 billion development of office towers, residential buildings and parks over the railyards between 30th and 33rd Streets, from 10th to 12th Avenues.

    The No. 7 subway line extension has been one long compromise since 2002. Originally, the Bloomberg administration wanted to extend the line from Times Square west and south to 34th Street, before turning east to run into Pennsylvania Station.

    But the estimated cost of the two-block-long link to Penn Station, which required drilling underneath existing rail lines, was prohibitive at $1 billion.

    The extension was never a priority for the transportation authority, which builds, operates and maintains the city’s subways and commuter rail operations. To avoid a battle with proponents of the long planned Second Avenue subway, the Bloomberg administration offered to pay for the No. 7 line extension.

    But by 2006, the administration, in an effort to pare costs, said it would carve out the cavern and platforms for the second station but indefinitely delay building the station. In late 2007, the city and the authority scuttled the station project altogether.

    “A 10th Avenue station might sound nice,” said Andrew Brent, a spokesman for Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg, “but the M.T.A. and state budget problems are well known, and the city is in no position to step in to pay for that, too.”

    http://www.nytimes.com/2010/02/17/nyregion/17seven.html

  9. #309
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Merry View Post

    The city and the authority did retain an “option” with its construction contractor to build the second station, but that expired in September 2008.

    ... The second station would be on land at 41st Street and 10th Avenue where Related Companies is erecting a large residential tower. “I’m not slowing my building down for it,” said Related’s chief executive, Stephen M. Ross. “We were told there’s no money around at all. God knows, the M.T.A. doesn’t have any money.”
    This creates a huge problem for the Tenth / 41st Station. The way the Related project is being constructed the entire corner at Tenth / 41st is built out to the sidewalk (although there is open space about 50' to the east along W 41st). This should have been part of the redevelopment plan for that site. Now it will have to go through armies of lawyers to make it work.

    Stupidity on the part of NYC politicians. Very clever on the part of Related.

  10. #310

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    It's $800 million to build one subway station?

  11. #311
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    ^^ They make them out of pure gold now.

    Do they still plan to air condition the platforms on this extension?

  12. #312

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    I agree that this station needs to be built, however the 10th Ave. Station is not possible now because of (MTA) budget problems. But, I still feel the (MTA) should at least build a temporary station structure so there would be a possibility for a future station. I would rather have to wait few years for a new station instead of the whole extension being ditched.

  13. #313
    Crabby airline hostess - stache's Avatar
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    It would have made more sense to just extend the 7 to 1oth. Ave. Nobody goes to Javitz.

  14. #314

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    Quote Originally Posted by stache View Post
    Nobody goes to Javitz.
    It's too crowded?

  15. #315

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    Quote Originally Posted by stache View Post
    It would have made more sense to just extend the 7 to 1oth. Ave. Nobody goes to Javitz.
    What about the railyard?

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