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Thread: The Alexander - 250 East 49th Street - Turtle Bay - Condo

  1. #1

    Default The Alexander - 250 East 49th Street - Turtle Bay - Condo

    This is my aunts block so she wants to know what's up......she says 2 <nice> brownstones were knocked down and I walked by the site.......I'd say the lot width is about 30-40 feet.

    The location is E 49th b/t 2nd and 3rd, but very close to second, south side of the street (Just west of the SW corner of 49th/2nd)

    Any help? Can't be anything major but it's good to know.

  2. #2
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    At 252, 254 and 256 East 49th there are recent demolition permits for 3 floor buildings. There's a new building application listed but not posted. Sydness Architects is the architect.

    At 254 there is a scaffolding application that refers to an 8 floor building with 30 units; I'm assuming that's what's going up.

  3. #3
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    Ok found it

    250 East 49th Street
    20 floors, 209 ft
    31 units
    Architect: Sydness Architects


  4. #4
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    Ughhhhh...

    Look at those scary tentacles supporting the section overhanging the poor little building to the left.

  5. #5

    Thumbs down

    Trying to be innovative for the sake of being innovative and completely missing the mark.

  6. #6

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    Wouldnīt we rather have the "2 <nice> brownstones" ?

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by Fabrizio
    Wouldnīt we rather have the "2 <nice> brownstones" ?
    Yes. The block is almost entirely brownstones, one is even the residence of the guy representing Sierra Leone at the UN (there's a plaque).

    I'm surprised at its height. That building will not fit in. What a shame.

    BTW thanks a lot Gul.
    Last edited by sfenn1117; August 15th, 2005 at 10:34 PM.

  8. #8

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    Are they nice brownstones that have all of their exterior ornamentaition and cornices, or are they run-down brownstones whose ornamentation has been stripped? If the former, it's a shame to lose them. If the latter (which is typical for the area east of Third), then it's no big loss notwithstanding the fact that this is a lame building. Moreover, the building on 2nd seems to have lost all of its ornamentation. Therefore, it's a shame that it was not demolished as well.

  9. #9
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    Hopefully the monstrosity pictured has not been approved.

    The post that mentions 8 stories describes a building that would be far better in size, and could hardly be worse in design.

  10. #10

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    "Moreover, the building on 2nd seems to have lost all of its ornamentation. Therefore, it's a shame that it was not demolished as well."

    LondonLawyer.... this is a ploy building owners do all the time. They strip their buildings rather than invest in upkeep... itīs a protection against possible landmarking. They should be fined.... and required to replace what has been lost. Also: even if these building have been stripped, they still create a people-friendly, low, intimate scale.... and that alone is often worth preserving.

  11. #11

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    Hi, Fabrizio.

    I speculate that the buildings that have been stripped of their ornamentation are rent controlled buildings and the owners don't want to pay to maintain it.

    These buildings look horrible without the mouldings. I agree that they should be required to replace them.

  12. #12

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    I agree, what a shame that the brownstones were demolished to make room for a monstrosity, rather than being restored. I fear that the midtown east brownstone is going to soon go the way of the Hippodrome and the Third Avenue El...extinct

  13. #13
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    Better for this area would be something that tries to imitate the neighborhood on the lower stories, and either does the same with a setback higher up OR tries to be "invisible" with the use of mirrored glass and the like.


    Any building that would be more than 3 stories higher than the brownstones would stand out (good bad or otherwise) but at least this would be less noticable.

    Unfortunately, all the buildings I see going up now are the fastest pre-fab constructions I have seen. They do not even TRY to imitate anything, just cheap and fast exterior and concentrate on the marble countertops so they can call it a "luxury" rental or condominium.

    It's a shame, but that's what people want that can be built for the most profit margin in the shortest time frame.

    And that is what we are getting.

  14. #14
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    I really don't understand the acceptance of the cantilevered building extensions such as the one shown in the rendering above.

    They look ridiculous.

    Why does DOB / City Planning even allow this?

  15. #15

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    Infact, it amazes me that such a BIG deal is made about granite counter tops and a few European-made appliances....when you are paying nearly a million dollars for an apartment. Notice that there is usually no talk in the sales pitch about build quality ...only about the half-inch thick marble or wood veneer in the lobby. Is there any other major American city with such ugly and shoddy residential buildings buit in the center of town? Certainly no where in Europe. You can bet that this buildingī s web-site will show the pleasures of living on a "low-rise" block.... even while effectively destroying it.

    The NIMBYīs arenīt doing their job. As Ninjahedge mentions, there should be design guidelines about set-backs and street wall heights... otherwise say goodbye to these fragile side streets.

    BTW: Londonlawyer: that "stripped" building on the corner shows a nice canopy... a bar, a restaurant?... absolutely charming (with or with out itīs ornamentation)...pehaps itīs home to the kind of neighborhood joint we all appreaciate and expect in a residential area. What would you prefer, another glass high-rise with a Duane Reade? How ībout if we leave it alone.
    Last edited by Fabrizio; August 16th, 2005 at 09:37 AM.

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