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Thread: Sixties Demolitions

  1. #16
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Comelade
    There is a super Internet site, http://www.lostnewyorkcity.com/
    Thanks for that link...

    But I'm confused as to why The Cable Building (still standing at Broadway & Houston) is included.

  2. #17
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    Anyone know what kind of lease Penn Plaza and MSG have over Penn Station? That is one combo of buildings that is a serious blight on the cityscape.

  3. #18
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    As always, ablarc provides an inimitable wealth of information with one of his excellent threads.

    Speaking of Lost NYC, the webmaster of that site was a semi-regular poster here, and he always was very informative and eager to share information. He hasn't been around for a while, though; anyone know what happened to him?

  4. #19
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    Who was he (username)?

  5. #20
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    lostnyc :P

  6. #21

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    I'm still in touch with hime (Randall). He's busy selling casts he makes from rubber moulds he surreptitiously makes from carvings on old buildings. Very cool idea- I wish i could incorporate them into a design!



    http://www.lostnewyorkcity.com/forum...?showtopic=136

  7. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by Fabrizio
    I doubt that people will ever be crying over the loss of the NYColiseum at Columbus Circle, or the loss of a Madison Square Garden. These buildings were built with one thing in mind: efficiency and cost ...and that can always be duplicated. There is no art there. The Seagrams, the CBS building, Lever House, The Ford Foundation building, 510 5th, the UN building, even the (former) Pan Am etc. are a different story.... if any of those should be threatened, there will most certainly be a debate.... as is happening with 2 Columbus Circle.
    That's right, it's the presence of art that makes a building worth preserving. The sad thing is that we travel through history with a blind spot for the art of
    forty to seventy years back in time. For this period, the mere existence of a preservation movement not based on NIMBY considerations should be enough reason to shelve thoughts of demolition.

  8. #23
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    Regarding similarities between the Baths of Caracalla and the Old Penn Station ...

    While Caracalla certainly served as the inspiration for the main room of the Old Penn, there are many distinctions.

    The size of the two buildings is quite distinct, with the main room (tepidarium) at Caracalla smaller (82' x 170'; 125' high) than the main waitng room it inspired at Penn (277' long; 150' high).

    The lay-out of the two buildings is also quite different as can be seen in the images below.

    Caracalla

    http://www.greatbuildings.com/buildings/Thermae_of_Caracalla.html

    The central mass of the building measured 390 feet wide by 740 feet long.

    The largest room, the vaulted tepidarium, measured 82 by 170 feet. The inside height of the tepidarium has been estimated at 125 feet

    http://wings.buffalo.edu/AandL/Maecenas/rome/baths_caracalla/ac880320.html







    Old Penn Station

    http://www.forgotten-ny.com/STREET%20SCENES/Penn%20Station/penn.html


    Waiting Room: 277-foot long, 150-foot ceiling

    http://www.greatbuildings.com/models/Pennsylvania_Station_mod.html#mod





    http://www.answers.com/main/ntquery?...Penn%20Station



  9. #24

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    It's horrible to see all of the magnificent old buildings that we lost, but we are lucky to have kept so many as well. Areas like the UWS, parts of the UES (west of 3rd), the Village, the Flatiron Dist., etc. have mostly pre-war buildings. Moreover, I was looking at books recently of yesterday and today photos of Denver and Chicago, cities that have far, far, far fewer old structures per capita than NY. Sadly for them, they had many magnificent buildings from the late 1800's and early 1900's that were razed and replaced with crap.

  10. #25

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    edit.
    Last edited by Jim Koeleman; December 12th, 2008 at 07:02 AM.

  11. #26

  12. #27

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    Quote Originally Posted by expose05 View Post
    Some people say things happen for a reason. When people saw penn station get destroyed people were appauled and angry. Sadly somethings that were so historic and beautiful got destroyed and that's when the landmarks commission was created. So some good came out of it in ( Im not saying it was good to destroy those buildings) which these buildings got destroyed but so many buildings now are being saved and preserved. They are an example which mistakes were made and how we must never make those mistakes again in the future.
    Yeah, but have you been following the Landmarks Commission's recent performance? It's the little gems we're losing these days --the ones that give fine-grained character to a place.

    .
    Last edited by ablarc; September 19th, 2006 at 08:15 AM. Reason: punctuation

  13. #28

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    Quote Originally Posted by ablarc View Post
    Yeah, but have you been following the Landmarks Commission's recent performance? It's the little gems we're losing these days --the ones that give fine-grained character to a place.

    .
    I like Bloomberg. But, he needs to rethink his appointment of Robert Tierney at Landmarks.

    Unlike recent administrations including the Guliani era, Mr. Tierney's job is extremely important, as development pressures are pushing every site in NYC to re-evaluated for expansion, demolition, etc to maximize the FAR.

    Look what has recently fallen: Horn and Hardart 57th street, Warhol Factory 33rd st, The Sutton Theatre, Le Madri building 18th st, the Beekman Theatre.

    Look what is going: The Drake hotel, West 55th and west 54th street townhouses, west 13th street carriage house.

    I think the time has come to evaluate EVERY BUILDING IN THIS CITY - start with Manhattan, as the pressure is greatest there.

    We cannot afford to look back as we do to the 1960s and ask, "Why didnt anyone do anything?"

  14. #29
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    What makes you think that Tierney isn't doing exactly what he's been appointed to do?

  15. #30
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    Does anybody know why the knaves that decided to demolish the Singer Building chose its particular site. I mean they could have built Liberty Plaza a block away or something. Couldn't they? Why, why, why did they have to go out of their way to demolish that beauty when there might have been other sites available???

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