Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 45

Thread: Gansevoort Park Hotel - 420 Park Avenue South @ East 29th St - by Stephen B. Jacobs

  1. #1

    Default Gansevoort Park Hotel - 420 Park Avenue South @ East 29th St - by Stephen B. Jacobs

    Many small buildings on Park Ave. South and on East 29th are empty and scaffolding is up. One occupied building has a sign stating that the restaurant tenant will be moving in July.

    A rendering had been posted for this site on the 400 Park Ave. South site a long time ago.

    PS: I hope that 400 Park Ave. South starts soon.

  2. #2

    Default

    is that b/w 28th and 29th or 29th and 30th? west side of the street i assume?

  3. #3

    Default

    It's on the west side of the avenue. I believe it's between 28th and 29th Sts. However, it's on the corner of 29th and some of the buildings are midblock on 29th.

  4. #4

    Default

    DOB has a permit for a new 15 story building by Garrett Gourlay at 414 PAS. Based on the size of the building it looks like all the low-rises on that block will be taken down.

    http://a810-bisweb.nyc.gov/bisweb/Jo...26&requestid=1

    No demo permits, just for scaffolding.

  5. #5

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by sfenn1117 View Post
    DOB has a permit for a new 15 story building by Garrett Gourlay at 414 PAS. Based on the size of the building it looks like all the low-rises on that block will be taken down.

    http://a810-bisweb.nyc.gov/bisweb/Jo...26&requestid=1

    No demo permits, just for scaffolding.
    Thanks. Does Gourlay have a website?

  6. #6

    Default

    Wow I hope Pizza by the Inch finds a new home - that place is amazing!

    I have to say - that area is already really congested. I can't imagine how packed the streets will be with a few new towers going up. Between the 28th street train station and the 24 hour McDonalds that area is crowded pretty much all day/night.

  7. #7

    Default

    I'd be happier if this was still planned as an office tower.

    Photo of the site.

    As london mentions, this is the same site as "Horvath Tower" and some Ernst & Young looking office tower by BMDG. Maybe these 2 threads should be merged under 420 Park Ave. South.

    I attatched the now gone renderings of "Horvath Tower" by Keane Odell.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Horvath Tower 1  Keane Odell.gif 
Views:	438 
Size:	29.4 KB 
ID:	4274   Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Horvath Tower 2  Keane Odell.gif 
Views:	578 
Size:	58.3 KB 
ID:	4275   Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Horvath Tower 3  Keane Odell.gif 
Views:	481 
Size:	39.0 KB 
ID:	4276  

  8. #8

    Default

    Thanks for posting this photo, Derek.

    For those who have not walked by this site, it includes all of the buildings depicted in the photo.


  9. #9

    Default

    Thanks for posting this photo, Derek.

    For those who have not walked by this site, it includes all of the buildings depicted in the photo. except the big yellow brock one on the right hand side which is on 29th St.


  10. #10

    Default

    The buildings on PAS are nothing special, but those two walk-ups on E 29th are nice. More retail losses though.

    Gourlay does have a website but it doesn't offer much.
    http://go-arch.com/

  11. #11

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by sfenn1117 View Post
    The buildings on PAS are nothing special, but those two walk-ups on E 29th are nice. More retail losses though.

    Gourlay does have a website but it doesn't offer much.
    http://go-arch.com/
    I completely agree with you re: the two buildings on E 29th. They're quite nice. In fact, there are many beautiful old buildings on that street especially one located on the north side of the street which was recently restored.

  12. #12

    Default


    Square Feet

    "Counting on a Hotel to Make a Neighborhood Hot"

    By C. J. HUGHES
    Published: August 22, 2007

    To understand how the meatpacking district in downtown Manhattan was transformed from an obscure collection of a few bistros and boutiques scattered among beef-filled warehouses to a hot residential, commercial and entertainment destination, consider Michael Achenbaum’s explanation.

    Stephen B. Jacobs Group
    A developer is betting that his Gansevoort Park hotel, above, can replicate the success of his Hotel Gansevoort in Manhattan.

    The area around Park Avenue South and East 29th Street.
    One crucial event, he said, was the debut of the Hotel Gansevoort in March 2004 at West 13th Street and Ninth Avenue. After that, he said, the neighborhood suddenly seemed to have a lot more electricity.

    Mr. Achenbaum is not entirely objective, of course; he was the hotel’s developer. But the opening of his 13-story 187-room glass-and-steel property, which cost $70 million to build, was a relatively early signal to other investors about the area’s potential.

    In addition, the building’s distinctive rooftop bar and pool, open to nonguests, were almost instantly trendy and heightened the buzz about the neighborhood.

    Now Mr. Achenbaum, a principal of WSA Management, based in Garden City on Long Island, hopes to copy that neighborhood-fostering success with a new hotel, Gansevoort Park, at the southwestern corner of Park Avenue South and East 29th Street. It is to be developed with Centurion Realty, whose portfolio includes four million square feet of residential and commercial properties, including 12 other New York buildings.

    The hurdles, though, might be more daunting, since the area — squeezed between Murray Hill and the Flatiron District, with an unremarkable hodgepodge of phone stores, pharmacies and 16-story offices — does not have a catchy name, or much cachet.

    Still, Mr. Achenbaum is thinking splashy, and big: a 19-story glass-and-limestone building with 225 rooms, which will cost $200 million. (The financing is being provided by HSH Nordbank, a German commercial bank, and was locked in before the current credit crisis, he said.)

    A wide 150-foot-tall glass column containing light-emitting diodes will display mutating colors along the corner of the building’s facade, in a nod to four similar 15-foot columns at the Hotel Gansevoort.

    Gansevoort Park’s top three floors, open to the public, will cover 8,000 square feet. They will include bars, decks and a pool, though the exact configuration is being kept secret, Mr. Achenbaum said, to prevent a competitor from trying to install a similar feature before the hotel is finished in the spring of 2009.

    Guest-only areas will include a 3,500-square-foot catering space on the third floor, an outdoor deck and a 2,000-square-foot mezzanine-level spa.

    A 10,000-square-foot glass-fronted restaurant space on the sidewalk level, meanwhile, will be leased by Prime One Twelve, a New York offshoot of a Miami Beach steakhouse, though Mr. Achenbaum would not discuss the terms.

    He would say, though, that he hopes to get $200 a square foot in annual rent for an adjacent two-floor 1,800-square-foot retail space, preferably from a clothing store.

    The hotel site, which encompasses seven parcels that wrap around the corner, now holds a series of low-slung drab buildings, with street-level tenants that include a shoe store, a French restaurant and a bank. Demolition is to start next month, Mr. Achenbaum said.

    Gansevoort Park is likely to attract a different clientele than the midmarket hotels that dot the surrounding blocks. Many were built at the turn of the last century, when this neighborhood was a thriving hotel district.

    Similar-size hotels, like Hotel Thirty Thirty, which offers 253 rooms at 30 East 30th Street, or the Carlton, with 316 rooms at 88 Madison Avenue, charge about $250 a night for rooms on summer weekends.

    Gansevoort Park’s rooms, meanwhile, will cost about twice that.

    If the Park Avenue South area is underserved by luxury hotels, so is New York City over all, and the time is right to build them, said Daniel Lesser, a senior managing director with CB Richard Ellis and a specialist in hospitality real estate.

    In the last few years, conversions of hotels into condominiums have claimed more than 2,000 rooms in Manhattan, Mr. Lesser said, and the city is poised to lose almost that many more, with the imminent closing of the Hotel Pennsylvania, near Madison Square Garden, which has 1,700 rooms.

    Strong demand for New York’s existing 67,000 rooms has meant an average weekly occupancy rate in the last year of 82 percent, according to Smith Travel Research, a lodging industry data provider based in Hendersonville, Tenn. In practical terms, this means weekend nights are usually completely booked, said Jan Freitag, a vice president.

    By comparison, Miami, which also attracts a mix of business and leisure travelers, is filling 76 percent of its hotel rooms, while San Francisco is at 72 percent.

    “Any new hotel makes sense, because the city clearly needs rooms,” said Mr. Lesser, without commenting on the Gansevoort Park specifically. “And this goes for every submarket, river to river, from 125th Street to Lower Manhattan.”

    Gradually, developers seem to be responding. About 8,000 rooms are now under construction, which would be a 12 percent increase, according to Smith Travel. Some, like Gansevoort Park, are planned for traditionally underserved areas; other neighborhoods that have been identified as prime sites are the Bowery and Harlem.

    Although Gansevoort Park’s developers may sell some rooms as condos, for now they are focused on making the property a round-the-clock business, they said.

    It is critical, then, that they attract those who work in the area, at employers like Credit Suisse First Boston, which has large offices at 1 and 11 Madison Avenue, about five blocks away, said Nathan Gindi, vice president of Centurion Realty, which is based in Manhattan.

    “We want people to come in for lunch and after work, not just check in and out,” he said. “We want this to be a destination.”

  13. #13

    Default

    I'm guessing the original building permit by Garrett Gourlay was for residential and the new owners are developing this hotel. This is a nice development, a trendy hotel could change the feel of this dreary area.

  14. #14
    Crabby airline hostess - stache's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Nairobi Hilton
    Posts
    8,511

    Question LL what's the deal?

    You're posting the same article in multiple threads(?)

  15. #15
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    NYC - Downtown
    Posts
    32,654

    Default

    And the same pic of the same cheesy project

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Hudson River Park
    By Edward in forum New York City Guide For New Yorkers
    Replies: 383
    Last Post: July 3rd, 2014, 05:21 PM
  2. Night owls released in Central Park
    By Edward in forum New York City Guide For New Yorkers
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: February 4th, 2011, 09:53 AM
  3. W New York - Times Square Hotel
    By hyperfine in forum New York City Guide For Visitors
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: January 18th, 2005, 08:55 PM
  4. Central Park at dusk and Manhattan skyline
    By Edward in forum Photos and Videos of New York
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: February 11th, 2002, 05:37 AM
  5. Pictures of luxurious W Hotel - Times Square
    By Edward in forum New York City Guide For Visitors
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: December 29th, 2001, 12:36 AM

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  


Google+ - Facebook - Twitter - Meetup

Edward's photos on Flickr - Wired New York on Flickr - In Queens - In Red Hook - Bryant Park - SQL Backup Software