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Thread: 400 Fifth Avenue @ 36th St - Setai Hotel and Condo - by Gwathmey Siegel & Associates

  1. #436

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    Quote Originally Posted by NoyokA View Post
    Some strategically placed setbacks especially nearing the top would have done a world of good.
    I agree.

    Quote Originally Posted by lofter1 View Post
    Harsh.
    I agree.

  2. #437

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    Set backs would have been nice.... maybe I should have said "But the rest is relatively super".

    --

    LOL... our ol' Ablarc's a harsh troll.

  3. #438

    Default "your [sic] a troll"

    If you're a poor grammarian, your grammar is poor.

  4. #439

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    Look who's talking, you spelled "sick" wrong.

    Anyway, it's supposed to be "you're sick, a troll"

    BTW: why is everybody suddenly dumping on ablarc?

  5. #440
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    I thought [sic] meant the improper spelling of the word before it.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sic

    Or maybe it is some joke that just flew over my head.

  6. #441

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    Quote Originally Posted by Fabrizio View Post
    BTW: why is everybody suddenly dumping on ablarc?
    Everybody?

  7. #442

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    Harsh, a troll, sick, can't spell....


    -------

    ramvid01: Here's some more Latin for you: "vescere bracis meis"



  8. #443

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    Quote Originally Posted by Fabrizio View Post
    BTW: why is everybody suddenly dumping on ablarc?
    Evidently the problem was ablarcís posts got shorter and shorter; many contained only one sentence. This was after years of verbose posts Ėsome of which were choked with pictures which have been sent to server heaven, perhaps never to return.

    Just to prove that wordy ablarc posts are still possible, hereís one that showed up not too long ago in the Gwathmey obituary thread, but itís also quite on-topic here, since it contains references to his architecture.

    Since it has several hundred words, it will no doubt satisfy some moderators; and it may even qualify as an example of trolling:


    * * *

    The room was pregnant with anticipation. The young architectural Turk would lecture at Harvard after all, but not under the Schoolís auspices, and not in the lecture hall. The student radicals had to invite him after the School refused, and he probably wasnít paid.

    In the facultyís eyes, here was a pariah to be shunned along with the apostates Venturi, Graves, and later Stern. His message appalled the good professors; it deeply undermined the painstakingly-assembled Modernist ideology that they pimped as gospel. To a man, they were disciples of Gropius, Sert and Kallmann (and in fact they actually were Gropius, Sert and Kallmann). And to a man, they boycotted the lecture.

    The young Turkís message he proudly shared with his colleagues in the New York Five, and it was this: a design process would be forged out of the early (Villa Savoie) vocabulary of Le Corbusier, combined with heavily encrypted references to buildings from the misty past --especially Renaissance Italy. Here would be erudite dialogue with history, but without the slightest descent into the literal; this movement was all about translation. And so abstruse were the translations that only the most historically literate had a prayer of pinpointing the translationís source. (It is this historicizing that causes some to mistake Gwathmey and Meier for PostModernists; in fact the vocabulary is entirely from the Modernist pattern book.)

    You could think of it as erudition parading behind a veil.

    Later --as Eisenman pointed out-- Graves and Eisenman jumped ship from the Modernist vocabulary, but not Gwathmey and Meier. The latter found that he could extract from Corbuís style more ravishing beauty (or at least, prettiness) than Corb himself ever knew was there, while Gwathmey started trying clothes from the wardrobe of Mies and others --sometimes with truly gauche results. His addition to Rudolphís Art and Architecture building is an unmitigated disaster; Rudolphís much greater talent shows Gwathmey to be the fair-to-middling architect that history will mostly judge him to be. His Astor Place building, however, I find lamentable only in that itís burdened with a ground floor bank; I donít mind that the curve is made with flat panes, and I think itís altogether a nice foil to Cooper Unionís glowering megalump(s).

    What appeared in this room at Harvard awash with expectancy was a man in his thirties, virile in a tweed jacket and a balding head. As his baritone droned on about the fairly interesting modernist houses he was showing, no one was willing to admit that the man had not much verbal to add to the slides that passed across the screen. The images were interesting, the words less so. (But truth be told, even the images had a certain sameness.)

    Most of what he had to say of interest was about his client relationships and professional practice; he was much more of a practitioner than the glib theoretician, Eisenman.

    Because we worked at the same school, I frequently conversed with Charles Gwathmey. I found him to be earnest, a little humorless and less brilliant than Eisenman, Graves or Meier. He didnít say much that was original, and you could observe him reach the end of his erudition on a subject that was based on history. This also meant he wasnít really much of a teacher; he had to rely on his undeniable professional accomplishment, his emphatic way of speaking and his bulging muscles to keep his studentsí respect.

    My job also brought me in contact with his fellows in the New York Five: Eisenman, Graves and Meier.They were all great historicists and sartorial sharpies. Graves and Meier mostly sported Italian suits and lavender ties, while Eisenman preferred wise-guy suspenders and a bow tie --preferably one that clashed with his striped preppie shirt; that was the twist that diverted you from spotting his getup as a pretty good impersonation of Willie Stark or Ed Begley.

    Gwathmey, however, tended towards black tee shirts that fit tightly because he had so much muscle to show. Gwathmey was a body builder. He managed to wow the ladies because his physique distracted them from his polished pate. It was a better shtick than Eisenmanís recitations of batting averages.

    Here was a man so full of testosterone that he was bald in his thirties, and his stentorian baritone helped drive home the point; it had metallic overtones.

    His passing will leave a vacuum; Gwathmey filled his particular niche pretty much all by himself.



    (The place to look for the encrypted references in this building to Renaissance Italy is in Mantua.)

  9. #444
    Forum Veteran TREPYE's Avatar
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    ^Overkill. Post as you please, ablarc; even if it is a one liner.
    This...
    Quote Originally Posted by NoyokA View Post
    ...in my opinion...
    ...seems to be a minority one.

  10. #445
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
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    Wow, I know not from what vortex the troll comment came, but, yes ^, thankfully, a minority opinion.

    It does seem, however, that it's still a case of either an apostrophe in its wrongful place or it's been left out of its rightful place .

    Thanks for the sick [first meaning] LOL moment of the week .

  11. #446

    Default Crown

    I was walking up Broadway last nite and the crown was lit up. Very nice!!!!!!!!

  12. #447
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    Here is the lit crown at sunset today - seems to be missing a couple of teeth!! It wasn't lit last night (Sunday, March 7), so it seems to still be in the testing phase.

    I wonder if the corners will always be dark - I hope not.


  13. #448
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    I prefer the corners remain dark - it adds contrast from a distance, and it makes it easier to appreciate the third dimension.

  14. #449

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    The corners, perhaps, but surely not the off-center gap; that must be a malfunction.

  15. #450
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gulcrapek View Post
    I prefer the corners remain dark - it adds contrast from a distance, and it makes it easier to appreciate the third dimension.
    I don't know - to me, it just looks like something is missing. Maybe highlight it in a different, 'cooler' color, like a dark blue?

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