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Thread: 105 Norfolk Street - Blue Condo - by Bernard Tschumi

  1. #46

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    Quote Originally Posted by ryan
    I love the rendering - just hope the reality lives up to it.
    I hope white steam comes out of the top of it!!

  2. #47

  3. #48
    Forum Veteran macreator's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by czsz
    Was anything ever more out of place?
    I suppose it is out of place -- but who cares? It looks like a very unique building -- not a cookie-cutter "brick luxury" tower with exposed floorplates a la Avalon Chrystie.

  4. #49

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    Quote Originally Posted by czsz
    Was anything ever more out of place?
    Chrysler Building perhaps?

    Wrong type of thinking....

  5. #50

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    First of all, the Chrysler building although the tallest when it was built, was still a skyscraper among skyscrapers...set in a mid-town business district. And from the base of the crown on down, it´s massing and proportions are actually classical and it´s look is no different from any other art-deco skyscraper of the day. See 745 5th, built a few years earlier ...or especially the Fuller Building built in 1929. What made the Chrysler unique was the curved crown and spire...and the aluminum cladding... but the building fit very nicely into the neigborhood.
    Last edited by Fabrizio; January 7th, 2006 at 04:59 PM.

  6. #51

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    Quote Originally Posted by Fabrizio
    First of all, the Chrysler building although the tallest when it was built, was still a skyscraper among skyscrapers...set in a mid-town business district. And from the base of the crown on down, it´s massing and proportions are actually classical and it´s look is no different from any other art-deco skyscraper of the day. See 745 5th, built a few years earlier ...or especially the Fuller Building built in 1929. What made the Chrysler unique was the curved crown and spire...and the aluminum cladding... but the building fit very nicely into the neigborhood.
    The Guggenheim then...

    As evident by the photograph just posted this won't be the only highrise in the area and this is after all only New York City, I guess that's all beyond the point though...

  7. #52

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    Yes the real aliens-in-the-neighborhood are things like the Gugenheim, the Whitney, the Calhoun School on West End ... but they´re also relatively small and public buildings.

    This condo will certainly be joined by other over-styled creations... who knows, in 20 years time it all might be a great new neighborhood of architectural experimentation... or perhaps we´ll be saying, "what where they thinking?".

    (In the end I guess do agree with Macreator... better this than "a cookie-cutter "brick luxury" tower with exposed floorplates a la Avalon Chrystie".)

  8. #53

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    I'm not a big fan of context and even if I was there's not much context near Canal Street. IMO the sign of a healthy city is innovative architecture.

  9. #54
    Forum Veteran macreator's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stern
    IMO the sign of a healthy city is innovative architecture.
    Agreed

  10. #55

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    Something tells me, when the cheap glass is bolted onto the facade, that the cheerleaders comparing this building to the Chrysler or the Eiffel Tower (egad!) will find that it shall have more in common with the early-on-wow-factor-but-aging-ungracefully Westin Times Square.

    For that reason among others, the design doesn't necessarily seem that innovative to me...it merely allows it to seem even more conspicuous than it would as the sole tower in a relatively lowrise area, which is just a bit too much self-conscious anomalousness. It really borders on pretension.

  11. #56

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    ^ Agreed. Once the newness factor quickly wears off we'll be left with an ill proportioned structure covered in what appears to be a still frame from some media player visualization. Monumental and enduring it will not be.

  12. #57
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    With no cladding having been installed yet, it seems a bit to early to guess as to the quality or cost of the glass.

  13. #58
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    If the nearby "Hotel on Rivington" is any indication then no one should get their hopes too high for how the exterior of this one will look.

    http://www.hotelonrivington.com/



  14. #59
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    Touché. But at least there are no exposed floorplates, eh?

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