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Thread: Skywalk - Glass Viewing Platform over Grand Canyon

  1. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by alonzo-ny View Post
    I have always wondered, call me ignorant, but from what i understood native americans desired to live from the land as they did before us british etc arrived so why now do they build casinos and million dollar skywalks, not exactly living off the land is it?
    There land was taken from then and they are forced to live on reserves; income isn't exactly billions of dollars. Have to make money somehow.

  2. #17
    Forum Veteran TREPYE's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ablarc View Post
    Buildings in the shape of cliff walls: very clever and well done.
    Yeah you're right. Talk about contextual . I cant wait till it is done cuz I would so walk on it, it looks really spectacular.

  3. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by ryeler View Post
    There land was taken from then and they are forced to live on reserves; income isn't exactly billions of dollars. Have to make money somehow.
    What im trying to say is they survived before money was even a concept. Is what your trying to say that they cant live off the land they have in the reserves?

  4. #19

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    Short answer: Yes

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Native_..._United_States

    Start at Removal and Reservations

  5. #20

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    The entire dynamic of their lives has changed. The world around them has changed, so they need to change accordingly. Before, money was just peices of paper to them, now, it is a necessity. To answer your question, in many cases they cannot survive off their land. Before their land was taken from them they had the entire continent to live off the land, only taking what they needed, now, they are in many cases forced to live in parts of the country with no economical or geographical prosperity (maybe not so for western reserves, where oil may be found?). Take the glass walk for an example, is their a town or anything near there where money can be brought in? No, they need tourists to be brought in. These people are neglected once they are in there reserves.

  6. #21

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    That whole situation sucks, a human society where they didnt destroy their land and respected nature for once and they were destroyed by other humans, really sad.

  7. #22
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    Plus we, the citizens of the USA, owe the tribes collectively billions of dollars ... which might have come in handy after our government forced them onto reservations ...

    Tribes File Trust Funds Mismanagement Lawsuit Against Federal Government

    http://www.narf.org/pubs/pr/06trust.htm
    December 28, 2006

    BOULDER, CO – The Native American Rights Fund (NARF), a non-profit law firm in Boulder, Colorado announced today that it has filed a class action lawsuit in federal district court in Washington, D.C. on behalf of over two hundred and fifty (250) Indian Tribes. The suit seeks full and complete accountings from the federal government for hundreds of tribal accounts worth billions of dollars that are held in trust by the United States. The federal government long ago assumed the role of trustee for tribal trust funds, and created the accounts at issue. The funds come from revenues from tribal natural resources such as timber, minerals, oil and gas; court judgments entered against the United States for the unlawful appropriation of Indian land and property; and, income from the investments of money held in the accounts. The federal government gave Tribes no choice about the creation of these trust fund accounts, some of which date back to the 1800s ...

  8. #23

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    It is just as bad in Canada. I actually live in near Caledonia Ontario, im not sure if anyone in the states has ever heard of it, but some native peoples are on a peice of land that is claimed by many other people that it 'belongs to the town', and its not theirs. I personnaly believe that it belongs to the natives, but the whole thing is just a giant mess.

    As regards for the lawsuit, I think it's a great idea, but i doubt the federal government would ever fork out billions of dollars for them. sad

  9. #24
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    The land was taken from their ancestors and not from them. We have natives that live in dreadful reserves in Northern Ontario. Why don't they do what millions of others have done over the generations and move to where the jobs and opportunities are?

    How many immigrants fled Europe and other continents over the centuries for the opportunities in North America. How many lost everything and left under horrible conditions to come here? My parents fled communist central Europe when everything was taken from them. They came to Canada with nothing, not even the english language. Instead of stewing about what happened to them they looked forward. They worked hard and today they are totally well off.

    Yet these natives continue to pine for something that was lost to them hundreds of years ago. Why not realize that's its time to put the past in the past and get on with living with today's reality. I know it isn't PC to say this but that's my view.

  10. #25
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    Ed007 -- The Tribes are not pining for "something that was lost". The US Government created a Trust Fund (the Natives had no choice in the matter -- it was a fait accompli when they were moved off their land and onto reservations). The Fund was fed by proceeds from land leases and resources taken from lands "given" to the Tribes. Yet for the past 100+ years the US Government has failed to fulfill its fiduciary responsibility to manage the Trust and to pay out the proceeds to the Tribes. Apparently agents of the US Government have actually robbed the Fund. Legally the Tribes have a very strong case. But the US Government has reneged on just about every agreement that it ever wrote with the Tribes from day one, so getting us (the citizens of the US) to pay the Tribes what is rightfully theirs might be an impossible task.

    It's nothing any of us should feel an ounce of pride about. In fact it is shameful when you study the history.

    As for those who immigrated to the US: that is a whole different ball of wax. They had no contract assuring them of anything once they arrived in the US. The Tribes, on the other hand, have written contracts with the US Government -- and are declared separate and sovereign entities by the US Constitution.

  11. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ed007Toronto View Post
    Yet these natives continue to pine for something that was lost to them hundreds of years ago. Why not realize that's its time to put the past in the past and get on with living with today's reality. I know it isn't PC to say this but that's my view.
    They shouldn't have to change. Towards the beggining they were promised compinsation, but it never came. I rememmber reading about confrences where native leaders said they wanted to forgive and forget, but they need justice first.

    Reality shouldn't have to confict with a certain culture. People in northern parts of Canada, South America, or Africa should not have to change just because western civilization has. That is the type of ignorance that is pushing our world economy into a worse state; making the gap between the rich and the poor larger. It is a choice that people have, to live in the ways that their ancestors did. The aboriginals of North America just got caught in a really bad situation, that they're still in. Realization isn't necissary.

  12. #27
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    Back to the "Skywalk" ...

    Buzz Aldrin keynotes Grand Canyon Skywalk
    opening ceremony


    APN Photo


    Indian leaders and former astronauts stepped
    gingerly beyond the Grand Canyon's rim Tuesday,
    staring through the glass floor and into the 4,000-foot
    chasm below during the opening ceremony for a new
    observation deck.

    LA TIMES
    By Chris Kahn, Associated Press
    March 20, 2007

    ARIZONA | GRAND CANYON

    A few members of the Hualapai Indian Tribe, which allowed the Grand Canyon Skywalk to be built, hopped up and down on the horseshoe-shaped structure. At its edge — 70 feet beyond the rim — the group peeked over the glass wall.

    "I can hear the glass cracking!" Hualapai chairman Charlie Vaughn said playfully.

    The deck is anchored deep into a limestone cliff. As people walk across it, the glass layers creak and the deck wobbles almost imperceptibly. To one side, the Colorado river appears as a slim, pea-green ribbon. To the other is a triangular dip in the canyon's ridge, known as "Eagle Point" because it looks like a bird with outstretched wings.

    When the wind blows, only the most daring visitors resist grabbing the steel rail to steady their knees.

    Former astronaut Buzz Aldrin, who was invited to join the tribe along with former astronaut John Herrington, declared it a "magnificent first walk."

    "It felt wonderful," Aldrin said after stepping off the deck, although "not exactly like floating on air."

    The Hualapai, whose reservation is about 90 miles west of Grand Canyon National Park, allowed Las Vegas developer David Jin to build the $30-million Skywalk in hopes of creating a unique attraction on their section of the canyon.

    "To me, I believe this is going to help us. We don't get any help from the outside, so why not?" said Dallas Quasula Sr., 74, a tribal elder who was at the Skywalk. "This is going to be our bread and butter."

    The tribe will include access to the deck in a variety of tour packages ranging from $49.95 to $199.00. They'll allow up to 120 people at a time to look down to the canyon floor thousands of feet below, a vantage point more than twice as high as the world's tallest buildings.

    Architect Mark Johnson said the Skywalk can support the weight of a few hundred people and will withstand wind up to 100 mph. The observation deck has a 3-inch-thick glass bottom and has been equipped with shock absorbers to keep it from bouncing like a diving board as people walk on it.

    The Skywalk is scheduled to open to the public March 28.

    Copyright 2007 Los Angeles Times

  13. #28
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    Skywalk's glass made for clarity, durability


    Rob Schumacher/The Arizona Republic
    Hualapai Tribe leaders make a ceremonial walk Tuesday afternoon on
    the glass-bottomed Skywalk, which hangs 4,000 feet above the floor
    of the Grand Canyon.

    The Arizona Republic
    Russ Wiles
    Mar. 21, 2007 12:00 AM

    The glass used in the new Grand Canyon Skywalk has a connection to French kings and the Palace of Versailles.

    The durable, ultraclear glass for the bridge was manufactured by Saint-Gobain, a three-century-old Paris firm that supplied the glass in 1682 for the palace's famed Hall of Mirrors. More recently, Saint-Gobain also made the glass used in the "Pyramid" building at Paris' Louvre museum.

    The tempered, laminated Skywalk glass, which is more than two inches thick, was manufactured at a plant in Cologne, Germany. It contains less iron oxide than regular glass, increasing clarity. It's capable of withstanding a magnitude 8.0 earthquake and winds of 100 miles per hour.

    Saint-Gobain, the world's largest supplier of building materials including abrasives and ceramics, generated $52 billion in sales last year. It employs 200,000 people worldwide, including 24,000 in the U.S. and Canada, many in the company's CertainTeed subsidiary.

    Copyright © 2007, azcentral.com.

  14. #29
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    Grand Canyon glass Skywalk opens

    BBC

    link ^^^ to VIDEO with Aerial views

  15. #30

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    Quote Originally Posted by lofter1 View Post
    It's capable of withstanding a magnitude 8.0 earthquake and winds of 100 miles per hour.
    Can't see the seams. How many pieces of glass?

    How do they keep it clean?

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