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Thread: Hurricane Katrina

  1. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by BrooklynRider
    The Mayor's Fund to Advance New York City is collecting funds from New Yorkers (put "Hurricane Katrina Relief" in note line). This will be money given to relief on behalf of the citizens of New York.
    link

  2. #47
    Crabby airline hostess - stache's Avatar
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    These poor people need to get a clue. If they are able, they need to start walking out of town. It will be easier for the busses to get to them that way.

  3. #48
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Law & Order
    Didnt The U.S. save their asses?
    Yep -- But you do have to wonder about someone who is from the Kuwaiti "Ministry of Endowment" ...

  4. #49
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by stache
    These poor people need to get a clue. If they are able, they need to start walking out of town. It will be easier for the busses to get to them that way.
    The busses are passing them by -- only those in the Dome are being allowed on the busses.

    Why the hell weren't busses provided BEFORE the hurricane when the evacuation was ordered? Many of these people had no independent transportation.

    And don't tell me the government did the best they could. They saw the trouble brewing as early as Saturday but did nothing to serve those citizens who could not fend for themselves.

    Again, I say God have mercy on those of us in Manhattan when the shit hits the fan.

  5. #50
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    Big difference, lofter, is that we're not below sea level. If Katrina had hit us, most of the city is high enough above sea level to escape 30-foot storm surges.

    Of course, if we're hit by a possible tsunami if Cumbre Vieja in the Canary Islands erupts, we might have a problem; that thing's supposed to be over 80 feet high.

  6. #51
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    World responds to Katrina with compassion — mostly

    VIENNA, Austria (AP) — From papal prayers to telegrams from China, the world reacted with an outpouring of compassion Wednesday for the victims of Hurricane Katrina in messages tinged by shock that a disaster of this scale could occur in the United States.

    Islamic extremists rejoiced in America's misfortune, giving the storm a military rank and declaring in Internet chatter that "Private" Katrina had joined the global jihad, or holy war. With "God's help," they declared, oil prices would hit $100 a barrel this year.

    Venezuela's government, which has had tense relations with Washington, offered humanitarian aid and fuel. Venezuela's Citgo Petroleum Corp. pledged a $1 million donation for hurricane aid. (Related story: Economic fallout will be massive)

    Saudi King Abdullah bin Abdulaziz also called President Bush to offer assistance. The minister of petroleum and mineral resources said Monday that Saudi Arabia is ready to immediately increase its crude oil production to replace any market shortages and help stabilize world crude prices.

    The storm was seen as an equalizer — proof that any country, weak or strong, can be victimized by a natural disaster. (Related story: Tsunami zone sympathizes)

    Images of flood-ravaged New Orleans earned particular sympathy in central Europe, where dozens died in raging floodwaters only days ago.

    "Nature proved that no matter how rich and economically developed you are, you can't fight it," says Danut Afasei, a local official in Romania's Harghita county, where flooding killed 13 people last week.

    Throughout Europe, concerned citizens lamented the loss of life and the damage caused to New Orleans, often described as one of North America's most "European" cities.

    French President Jacques Chirac and German Chancellor Gerhard Schroeder sent messages of sympathy to President Bush. Chirac, who has famously quarreled with Bush over the Iraq war, addressed this letter, "Dear George."

    Pope Benedict XVI said he was praying for victims of the "tragic" hurricane while China's President Hu Jintao expressed his "belief that that the American people will definitely overcome the natural disaster and rebuild their beautiful homeland."
    (Related story: Pope prays for victims, rescuers)

    Britain's Queen Elizabeth II also sent a message to Bush saying she was "deeply shocked and saddened" at the devastation caused by the hurricane and expressing her condolences, "especially to the families of those who have lost their lives, to the injured and to all who have been affected by this terrible disaster."

    The U.S. Embassy in Bern, Switzerland — a capital at the foot of the Alps hit by flooding last week — said calls were rushing in from Swiss individuals and institutions looking for a way to donate to relief efforts.

    "We are getting calls from the Swiss public looking to express their condolences, (and) people are also asking for an account number where they can make donations," said spokesman Daniel Wendell.

    The Internet-edition Vienna daily Der Standard had recorded 820 postings commenting on a front-page story on the hurricane. In one of the postings, signature "Emerald" asked where money could be donated to the victims, but the question sparked a debate about whether a rich country like the United States needed such aid.

    In response, one posting, from signature "far out," argued that hurricane victims who are poor still needed support.

    A spokeswoman for the Canadian Red Cross said lists of volunteers experienced in large-scale disasters were being assembled.

    Amid the sympathy, however, there was criticism.

    As U.S. military engineers struggled to shore up breached levees, experts in the Netherlands expressed surprise that New Orleans' flood systems failed to restrain the raging waters.

    With half of the country's population of 16 million living below sea level, the Netherlands prepared for a "perfect storm" soon after floods in 1953 killed 2,000 people. The nation installed massive hydraulic sea walls.


    "I don't want to sound overly critical, but it's hard to imagine that (the damage caused by Katrina) could happen in a Western country," said Ted Sluijter, spokesman for the park where the sea walls are exhibited. "It seemed like plans for protection and evacuation weren't really in place, and once it happened, the coordination was on loose hinges." (Related story: New Orleans didn't heed engineers' warnings)

    The sympathy was muted in some corners by a sense that the United States reaped what it sowed, since the country is seen as the main contributor to global warming.

    Joern Ehlers, a spokesman for World Wildlife Fund Germany, said global warming had increased the intensity of hurricanes.

    "The Americans have a big impact on the greenhouse effect," Ehlers said. (Related story: Scientists: Global warming pumps up storms)

    But Harlan L. Watson, the U.S. envoy for negotiations on climate change, denied any link between global warming and the strength of storms.

    "Our scientists are telling us right now that there's not a linkage," he said in Geneva. "I'll rely on their information."

    Copyright 2005 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

  7. #52
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    I'm going to suggest, at the expense of possible wrath, that folks forgo the "Disaster Inc." organizations like Catholic Charities and Red Cross and go to Craigslist. You can utilize the same resources and more DIRECTLY help people.

    We can see the struggle playing out on TV between reporters on the ground trying to convey TRUTH and spin masters diluting the true horror. Screw the bureaucracies - they failed and, in doing so, help create this mess - help the people directly. They are finding their way onto Craigslist. Seek them out.

  8. #53
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TLOZ Link5
    Big difference, lofter, is that we're not below sea level.
    That's not the shit I'm talking about. Not the natural disaster stuff. It's the other shit -- when some man-made ugly thing happens. Again.
    As we can see it doesn't take long for communication, distribution, transportation, supply systems to break down. And the geniuses in charge probably think they have it figured out and will be able to keep things running.

    I have no faith in them at all.

  9. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by BrooklynRider
    Criagslist (New Orleans & Mobile) have Katrina On-line Emergency Centers. I've volunteered to call and email survivor and evacuee families, friends and loved ones as needed.
    Stupid question before I volunteer: if someone can use the Internet to access Craigslist, wouldn't they be able to use e-mail anyway?

  10. #55
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    Op-Ed Columnist
    http://www.nytimes.com/2005/09/02/op...02krugman.html
    A Can't-Do Government

    By PAUL KRUGMAN
    Published: September 2, 2005

    Before 9/11 the Federal Emergency Management Agency listed the three most likely catastrophic disasters facing America: a terrorist attack on New York, a major earthquake in San Francisco and a hurricane strike on New Orleans. "The New Orleans hurricane scenario," The Houston Chronicle wrote in December 2001, "may be the deadliest of all." It described a potential catastrophe very much like the one now happening.

    So why were New Orleans and the nation so unprepared? After 9/11, hard questions were deferred in the name of national unity, then buried under a thick coat of whitewash. This time, we need accountability.

    First question: Why have aid and security taken so long to arrive? Katrina hit five days ago - and it was already clear by last Friday that Katrina could do immense damage along the Gulf Coast. Yet the response you'd expect from an advanced country never happened. Thousands of Americans are dead or dying, not because they refused to evacuate, but because they were too poor or too sick to get out without help - and help wasn't provided. Many have yet to receive any help at all.

    There will and should be many questions about the response of state and local governments; in particular, couldn't they have done more to help the poor and sick escape? But the evidence points, above all, to a stunning lack of both preparation and urgency in the federal government's response.

    Even military resources in the right place weren't ordered into action. "On Wednesday," said an editorial in The Sun Herald in Biloxi, Miss., "reporters listening to horrific stories of death and survival at the Biloxi Junior High School shelter looked north across Irish Hill Road and saw Air Force personnel playing basketball and performing calisthenics. Playing basketball and performing calisthenics!"

    Maybe administration officials believed that the local National Guard could keep order and deliver relief. But many members of the National Guard and much of its equipment - including high-water vehicles - are in Iraq. "The National Guard needs that equipment back home to support the homeland security mission," a Louisiana Guard officer told reporters several weeks ago.

    Second question: Why wasn't more preventive action taken? After 2003 the Army Corps of Engineers sharply slowed its flood-control work, including work on sinking levees. "The corps," an Editor and Publisher article says, citing a series of articles in The Times-Picayune in New Orleans, "never tried to hide the fact that the spending pressures of the war in Iraq, as well as homeland security - coming at the same time as federal tax cuts - was the reason for the strain."

    In 2002 the corps' chief resigned, reportedly under threat of being fired, after he criticized the administration's proposed cuts in the corps' budget, including flood-control spending.

    Third question: Did the Bush administration destroy FEMA's effectiveness? The administration has, by all accounts, treated the emergency management agency like an unwanted stepchild, leading to a mass exodus of experienced professionals.

    Last year James Lee Witt, who won bipartisan praise for his leadership of the agency during the Clinton years, said at a Congressional hearing: "I am extremely concerned that the ability of our nation to prepare for and respond to disasters has been sharply eroded. I hear from emergency managers, local and state leaders, and first responders nearly every day that the FEMA they knew and worked well with has now disappeared."

    I don't think this is a simple tale of incompetence. The reason the military wasn't rushed in to help along the Gulf Coast is, I believe, the same reason nothing was done to stop looting after the fall of Baghdad. Flood control was neglected for the same reason our troops in Iraq didn't get adequate armor.

    At a fundamental level, I'd argue, our current leaders just aren't serious about some of the essential functions of government. They like waging war, but they don't like providing security, rescuing those in need or spending on preventive measures. And they never, ever ask for shared sacrifice.

    Yesterday Mr. Bush made an utterly fantastic claim: that nobody expected the breach of the levees. In fact, there had been repeated warnings about exactly that risk.

    So America, once famous for its can-do attitude, now has a can't-do government that makes excuses instead of doing its job. And while it makes those excuses, Americans are dying.

  11. #56
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    How many times over the past few days have we heard officials say "What has happened is worse than could have been imagined"?

    Perhaps if they had read this article from National Geographic (October 2004) they wouldn't be so quick to claim ignorance and run from responsibility.

    http://205.188.130.53/ngm/0410/feature5/


    Photograph by Tyrone Turner

    The Louisiana bayou, hardest working marsh in America, is in big trouble—with dire consequences for residents, the nearby city of New Orleans, and seafood lovers everywhere...

  12. #57
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    There's got to be some answer besides incompetence for the total failure of the feds to effectively help out NO. I just can't believe they can be that unorganized...

  13. #58

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    Indeed...

    -Much of the National Guard which would have assisted is in Iraq
    -Much of the money which could have gone into strengthening the levee system was sent to Iraq
    -Many of the social programmes which may have financially assisted the poor and suffering in New Orleans enough to allow them, at least, the financial means to escape the hurricane, were cut, in favour of more military spending...needed because of the Iraq War
    -Of the Homeland Security money which may have helped preparedness for such a crisis, a far greater amount per capita went to virtually depopulated Western states like Wyoming than those vulnerable to natural or manmade disasters

    While I don't believe, necessarily, that widespread flooding and such could have been completely prevented, but surely the scenes of people living among corpses, fecal matter, and armed rape-gangs are not those one begins to expect to see in the United States, at least when priorities are properly ordered.

  14. #59

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ninjahedge
    Careful bobby, youar agrument is starting to sound like an Us vs. Them.
    Well, did you watch the news specials about Katarina last night? Here are my observations:

    - people stuck in New Orleans dying are 99% poor black folks who had no means to evacuate;

    - people interviewed in big SUVs (loaded with food and water) complaining about gas shortage and no hotel rooms are all white folks.

    I'd thought we've gotten over the racial divide?

  15. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by bobby fletcher
    Well, did you watch the news specials about Katarina last night? Here are my observations:

    - people stuck in New Orleans dying are 99% poor black folks who had no means to evacuate;

    - people interviewed in big SUVs (loaded with food and water) complaining about gas shortage and no hotel rooms are all white folks.

    I'd thought we've gotten over the racial divide?
    It is not just racial.

    It is financial. I see plenty of black folks here in SUV's here in NYC whining about the price of gas.

    But the news people don't want to talk to city-folk.

    The key for eliminating racial profiling and seperation is for ALL people to stop using it, not just the ones abusing it.

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