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Thread: Rebuilding New Orleans

  1. #16
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    And many of the less grand neighborhoods throughout New Orleans had an unmistakeable beauty: lush & funky & irreplaceable.

    The thought of what might be re-built in their place gives one pause.

  2. #17
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    Maybe Daniel Liebskind can come up with some Masterplan - something with a sliver of "levee" that every August 31st can open up to let 100,000 gallons of sewage flow into the city at the precise moment the levess failed in 2005. Then, that winning design can be systematically dismantled until we have something that can be built....


    ....only to be let down when some ho-hum corporate schmo is given the contract to design it. After an initially, disappointing first draft - we will, in fact, get a plan to rebuild New Orleans - not as a vibrant city - but as an inpenetrable city, within a fort, behind a levee, protected by a dam, encased within a bomb-proof wall - 25 feet from the nearest street.

    I predict the corner stone of the new city will be layed in four years, with construction to commence once we determine that a snowball does have a chance in hell.

    Before that can happen we will have to determine if Lake Ponchartrain (that irascible and unpatriotic body of water) is, in fact, too close to the city. Victims families will call for the lake to be moved out of the state - while folks living on the lakefront will try to wrest control from the infidels and regain the high ground in the struggle to recast and recreate their community.

    Until it is all settled, the government will fence it all in and Chinese people from near and far will be on the outskirts selling pictures of drowning victims. George Pataki will appear each year, coming out og his 364 days of hibernation, to make a rambling, bombastic speech that actually says nothing but alludes to a "soaring memorial" every other sentence.

    Ultimately it will be rebuilt, and will be christened "New New Orleans" - which stuttering people everywhere will spell "N-E-W O-R-L-E-A-N-S".

  3. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by BrooklynRider
    will be christened "New New Orleans" - which stuttering people everywhere will spell "N-E-W O-R-L-E-A-N-S".
    haha - I love futurama.

  4. #19
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    If this is the way things are going to go in New Orleans then maybe Hastert was right -- bull-doze the whole thing, Uptown included...

    WSJ: White rich elude Orleans chaos, don't want poor blacks back

    John Byrne
    http://rawstory.com/news/2005/WSJ_Wh...oor__0908.html


    The Wall Street Journal front-page headline reads, "Old-Line Families / Escape Worst of Flood / And Plot the Future / Mr. O'Dwyer, at His Mansion, / Enjoys Highball With Ice; / Meeting With the Mayor."

    That is, however, just the beginning. According to the (paid-restricted) Journal, New Orleans' wealthy white neighborhoods emerged very much intact, while black neighborhoods are swimming in toxic sludge. The Journal piece, by Christopher Cooper, reads as something torn from the pages of Fitzgerald's iconic portrait of the roaring twenties--The Great Gatsby.

    "NEW ORLEANS -- On a sultry morning earlier this week," Cooper writes, "Ashton O'Dwyer stepped out of his home on this city's grandest street and made a beeline for his neighbor's pool. Wearing nothing but a pair of blue swim trunks and carrying two milk jugs, he drew enough pool water to flush the toilet in his home."

    He continues: "The mostly African-American neighborhoods of New Orleans are largely underwater, and the people who lived there have scattered across the country. But in many of the predominantly white and more affluent areas, streets are dry and passable. Gracious homes are mostly intact and powered by generators. Yesterday, officials reiterated that all residents must leave New Orleans, but it's still unclear how far they will go to enforce the order."
    "The green expanse of Audubon Park, in the city's Uptown area, has doubled in recent days as a heliport for the city's rich -- and a terminus for the small armies of private security guards who have been dispatched to keep the homes there safe and habitable. Mr. O'Dwyer has cellphone service and ice cubes to cool off his highballs in the evening. By yesterday, the city water service even sprang to life, making the daily trips to his neighbor's pool unnecessary. A pair of oil-company engineers, dispatched by his son-in-law, delivered four cases of water, a box of delicacies including herring with mustard sauce and 15 gallons of generator gasoline."

    How do they want the city rebuilt?

    "The power elite of New Orleans -- whether they are still in the city or have moved temporarily to enclaves such as Destin, Fla., and Vail, Colo. -- insist the remade city won't simply restore the old order. New Orleans before the flood was burdened by a teeming underclass, substandard schools and a high crime rate. The city has few corporate headquarters.

    "The new city must be something very different, Mr. Reiss says, with better services and fewer poor people. "Those who want to see this city rebuilt want to see it done in a completely different way: demographically, geographically and politically," he says. "I'm not just speaking for myself here. The way we've been living is not going to happen again, or we're out."

    Not every white business leader agrees, Cooper notes.

    "Some black leaders and their allies in New Orleans fear that it boils down to preventing large numbers of blacks from returning to the city and eliminating the African-American voting majority. Rep. William Jefferson, a sharecropper's son who was educated at Harvard and is currently serving his eighth term in Congress, says, "This is an example of poor people forced to make choices because they don't have the money to do otherwise," Mr. Jefferson says.

  5. #20

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    ROTFALMAO!!!! BTW, what about those who want to see the city rebuilt block by block as it was before the flood? Or those who argue that we need to "reimagine" the city and hold "Listening to the Bayou" meetings and come up with wacky ideas that residents don't want, like a tunneling I-10. Also, the French Quarter will be closed and Marti Gras will be canceled because nothing that does not affirm death can be done on hallowed ground
    Quote Originally Posted by BrooklynRider
    Maybe Daniel Liebskind can come up with some Masterplan -
    Last edited by Edward; September 8th, 2005 at 10:03 PM. Reason: Quote too long

  6. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by Law & Order
    What does that mean? I see laughing my ass off, but I dont know the ROFTA.
    rolling on the floor and laughing my ass off.

  7. #22

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    Translating from the asshole language: Grentrify New Orleans so that its the Soho of the Bayou....and get those n***rs out.

    Quote Originally Posted by lofter1
    [b][i]If this is the way things are going to go in New Orleans then maybe Hastert was right -
    Last edited by Edward; September 8th, 2005 at 10:04 PM. Reason: Quote too long

  8. #23
    Crabby airline hostess - stache's Avatar
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    Hmm, who's gonna clean Whitey's toilets? Maybe they expect their maids to commute by bus two hours each way every day (with Sunday evening off).

  9. #24
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    This would be a very smart move, considering Carter's extensive work with Habitat for Humanity...

    Dem 9/11 Commissioner Calls For Jimmy Carter To Head Rebuilding Of New Orleans
    Fri Sep 09 2005 12:01:20 ET

    This morning on Fox's "Fox and Friends," former Indiana Democrat congressman and 9/11 commissioner Tim Roemer called on President Bush to name former President Jimmy Carter to the head of efforts to rebuild New Orleans.

    Roemer told the stunned hosts: "The second thing we should do is put somebody like former President Jimmy Carter in charge of rebuilding New Orleans."

  10. #25

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    I think that putting Carter in charge would be a great idea, as long as Bush doesn't try to micrcomanage the rebuilding.

  11. #26
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    How insulting is it that Carter has not been asked by George the Retard not to assist. I'll take Carter's perceived weaknesses from back in his days in the White House to any strength this administration professes to have.

  12. #27
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    From the Christian Science Monitor (9.09.05):

    http://news.yahoo.com/s/csm/20050909...HE0BHNlYwN0bWE-

    The rebuilding lessons at ground zero may prove instructive to the Gulf Coast - inspiring hope that reconstruction can be done, but also providing a reality check. These things take time. Gulf Coast planners, to their credit, are moving quickly. They've already contacted the Lower Manhattan Development Corp. (LMDC), created to oversee the rebuilding of ground zero.

    "We plan to continue assisting in any way that will be useful in terms of the precedents established here, the lessons learned, and ... to offer encouragement that there is a better future ahead," says Stefan Pryor, LMDC president. "We have every confidence that Louisiana and the Gulf states will recover better than ever, just as lower Manhattan is doing."

    Part of that confidence comes from the rebuilding process itself, despite the setbacks and slow pace.

  13. #28
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    Make It an Island

    NY Times
    Op-Ed Contributor

    By BRUCE BABBITT
    Published: September 10, 2005

    http://www.nytimes.com/2005/09/10/op...10babbitt.html

    Washington

    AFTER the victims are interred and public officials held to account for the destruction of a great American city, Congress must determine what to rebuild and what to abandon to the encroaching waters of the Gulf of Mexico.

    New Orleans will survive only as an island surrounded by miles of open water. It will take a national effort, led by our best scientists, engineers and city planners, to achieve even this reduced vision of an American Venice. We must take the time to redesign the city to function as an island, with an island infrastructure, including relocated streets, highways and utilities. The island will need higher, stronger seawalls and levees sufficient to withstand new threats, including the rising sea levels and bigger hurricanes spawned in warming Atlantic waters.

    Sea levels are likely to rise two to three feet in this century. Coastal maps drawn from consensus estimates show that virtually all of the delta lands south of Baton Rouge and below Interstate 10 - some 5,000 square miles - will be submerged by the end of this century.

    State and local officials are understandably in denial about the impending loss of so much Louisiana land and heritage. The depth of their paralysis is underlined by a recent program to collect discarded Christmas trees from New Orleans to stack on barrier islands against the tides.

    In recent years state agencies assembled a $14 billion project called Coastal 2050. One of its proposals was to cut gaps in the Mississippi River levees, which would provide outlets for the river to deposit some of its sediment onshore to help rebuild the delta. This idea may help in a few areas, but it will do little to offset the vastly larger forces of a rising sea.

    Other proposals in the package include building coastal barriers, plugging delta channels dredged by oil companies and re-vegetating barrier islands. But overall the Coastal 2050 projects have as much chance of success as King Canute commanding the tides to recede.

    Congress should resist the urge to appropriate huge sums for piecemeal reconstruction efforts. Restoration of the city and the delta will be a national effort, and it should be guided by a national plan. Congress should charge a commission of our best scientists, engineers and planners to asses the alternatives, draw up a regional land plan and recommend a realistic course of action.

    Bruce Babbitt, a former secretary of the interior, is the author of the forthcoming "Cities in the Wilderness."

  14. #29

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    NOOOOOO! Nothing has happened here worth merit to help people in New Orleans. If they do things down there LMDC-style, we'll see a series of public hearings like Listening to the City (Listening to the Bayou?) coming up with all sorts of pie in the sky ideas and warring interests will fight to carve up the city (think Pro-Rebuilders, vs. Memorialists, vs. Urban Planning Dreamers who wanted more pork in the WTC battle.) In the case of New Orleans, it will be developers who want to make New Orleans like Disneyland while ignoring the poor of the city, versus fundamentalist "abandon ship" types who would leave most of the city as a wasteland.
    Quote Originally Posted by lofter1
    From the Christian Science Monitor (9.09.05):

  15. #30
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    Cover-up: toxic waters 'will make New Orleans unsafe for a decade'

    By Geoffrey Lean, Environment Correspondent
    Published: 11 September 2005
    http://news.independent.co.uk/world/...icle311818.ece

    Toxic chemicals in the New Orleans flood waters will make the city unsafe for full human habitation for a decade, a US government official has told The Independent on Sunday. And, he added, the Bush administration is covering up the danger.

    In an exclusive interview, Hugh Kaufman, an expert on toxic waste and responses to environmental disasters at the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), said the way the polluted water was being pumped out was increasing the danger to health.

    The pollution was far worse than had been admitted, he said, because his agency was failing to take enough samples and was refusing to make public the results of those it had analysed. "Inept political hacks" running the clean-up will imperil the health of low-income migrant workers by getting them to do the work.

    His intervention came as President Bush's approval ratings fell below 40 per cent for the first time. Yesterday, Britain's Deputy Prime Minister, John Prescott, turned the screw by criticising the US President's opposition to the Kyoto protocol on global warming. He compared New Orleans to island nations such as the Maldives, which are threatened by rising sea levels. Other US sources spelt out the extent of the danger from one of America's most polluted industrial areas, known locally as "Cancer Alley". The 66 chemical plants, refineries and petroleum storage depots churn out 600m lb of toxic waste each year. Other dangerous substances are in site storage tanks or at the port of New Orleans. No one knows how much pollution has escaped through damaged plants and leaking pipes into the "toxic gumbo" now drowning the city. Mr Kaufman says no one is trying to find out.

    Few people are better qualified to judge the extent of the problem. Mr Kaufman, who has been with the EPA since it was founded 35 years ago, helped to set up its hazardous waste programme. After serving as chief investigator to the EPA's ombudsman, he is now senior policy analyst in its Office of Solid Wastes and Emergency Response. He said the clean-up needed to be "the most massive public works exercise ever done", adding: "It will take 10 years to get everything up and running and safe."

    Mr Kaufman claimed the Bush administration was playing down the need for a clean-up: the EPA has not been included in the core White House group tackling the crisis. "Its budget has been cut and inept political hacks have been put in key positions," Mr Kaufman said. "All the money for emergency response has gone to buy guns and cowboys - which don't do anything when a hurricane hits. We were less prepared for this than we would have been on 10 September 2001."

    He said the water being pumped out of the city was not being tested for pollution and would damage Lake Pontchartrain and the Mississippi river, and endanger people using it downstream.

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