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Thread: New Jersey Transit

  1. #136
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sid View Post
    I appreciate Nexis' dedication somewhat, but the problem is he almost NEVER gives links to any sources to back up what he says. I'm not just talking here, I see him on other forums as well. He talks about new light rail and heavy rail lines, and new stations in New Jersey all the time, but never shares his supposed sources. Ever.
    True , i guess i should work on that more.... 45% of my info comes form Employees , so i just assume there right and never check the source out. The Majority of times they are right tho....

  2. #137

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nexis4Jersey View Post
    True , i guess i should work on that more.... 45% of my info comes form Employees , so i just assume there right and never check the source out. The Majority of times they are right tho....
    I only say this because I'm often interested in reading more about these things you say. Like you'll say they're going to build a new light rail line going west through Jersey City from Hoboken Terminal. Why can't I find anything about that online? Or all these other new lines you talk about.

  3. #138
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sid View Post
    I only say this because I'm often interested in reading more about these things you say. Like you'll say they're going to build a new light rail line going west through Jersey City from Hoboken Terminal. Why can't I find anything about that online? Or all these other new lines you talk about.
    Some of this is old news , and thus the links are gone....thats the problem i have with alot of the projects. Even the ones UC like the Pennsuaken Transit Center , its very hard getting info on them for some reason. But if you dig hard enough or go to the cities where these lines are proposed to run through they have a map and info on it.

  4. #139

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    Good news, but I think the rest of the article was either cut off, or the writer just wanted to get the news out before he had a chance to write it up.

    http://www.mycentraljersey.com/artic...yssey=obinsite

  5. #140
    Jersey Patriot JCMAN320's Avatar
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    Exclamation Hudson River Tunnels Have 20 years Left to Live

    Amtrak chief gives aging Hudson rail tunnels 20 years to live, tops

    By Steve Strunsky/The Star-Ledger
    Email the author | Follow on Twitter
    on May 05, 2014 at 3:00 PM


    Workers demonstrated in North Bergen, in support of the ARC trans-Hudson rail tunnel in November 2010, which was cancelled by Gov Chris Christie. Amtrak CEO Joe Boardman warns the two existing tunnels now serving a crowded 160,000 passers per day could be forced to shut down within 20 years. (Ramin Talaie/Getty Images)

    Amtrak Chief Executive Officer Joe Boardman said the two existing rail tunnels that now carry 160,000 commuters a day under the Hudson River will have to be shut within 20 years, according to a published report.

    “I’m being told we got something less than 20 years before we have to shut one or two down,” Boardman said during a transportation conference last week in Manhattan, according to a report by Capital New York. “Something less than 20. I don’t know if that something less than 20 is seven, or some other number. But to build two new ones, you’re talking seven to nine years to deliver, if we all decided today that we could do it."

    The executive director of the transportation think tank that hosted the conference, the Regional Plan Association, described Boardman’s remarks as “a big shock,” the report said.

    “I’ve been hearing abstractly people at Amtrak and other people at New Jersey Transit say for years the tunnels are over 100 years old and we have to be worried about them,” the executive director, Tom Wright, was quoted as saying. “To actually have Joe put something concrete on the table, less than 20 years … Within my office, there was a level of, ‘Wow, this is really serious.'”

    In late 2010, Gov. Chris Christie cited already rising cost estimates and potential overruns when he cancelled longtime plans for the so-called ARC tunnel, a multi-billion dollar project that would have added two new tubes and doubled trans-Hudson rail capacity.

    NJ Transit was the lead agency on the project, which also involved the federal government and the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey. Christie directed the Port Authority to redirect $1.8 billion of the $3 billion it had set aside for the ARC project, and instead use it to overhaul the Pulaski Skyway and related infrastructure projects.

    Amtrak has since announced that it would take the lead on a new, "Gateway" tunnel project, though funding for the project has not been determined, and projections for its completion date range from 15 to 25 years.

    And that's not soon enough, said Boardman, according to the report.

    NJ Transit declined to comment.

    http://www.nj.com/news/index.ssf/201...t_river_hudson

  6. #141
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    What does Big Chris have to say about this?

  7. #142
    Crabby airline hostess - stache's Avatar
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    "What's for dinner"?

  8. #143
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
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    104-Year-Old Portal Bridge Presents $900 Million Problem for Rail Commuters

    By PATRICK McGEEHAN


    The Portal Bridge, over which 450 trains carry more than 150,000 riders a day, is in desperate need of replacement.
    The cost of replacing the bridge, which is blamed for frequent delays, is estimated at $900 million, none of which has been lined up.
    Robert Stolarik for The New York Times


    It carries more passenger trains than any other railroad bridge in the Western Hemisphere, yet few people beyond those who rely on it have heard of it. It goes largely unnoticed, unless something goes wrong, which happens with irritating frequency. After all, the bridge is 104 years old.

    Every time it swings open to let a boat pass is a test of early-20th-century technology that can snarl train travel from Boston to Washington, the nation’s busiest rail corridor. And over the years, because it is partially made out of wood, it also has proved to be quite flammable.

    To the tens of thousands of commuters on the hundreds of trains that cross it going to or coming from New York City, the Portal Bridge is infamous.

    Since the start of last year, the bridge has been blamed for about 250 delays on the rails, according to New Jersey Transit, which is its heaviest user.

    Even in an era when so much of the nation’s infrastructure is in a state of disrepair, the Portal Bridge stands out. Everyone agrees that it is in desperate need of replacement, but no one has come up with the money for a new crossing. Two recent significant delays caused by the bridge have focused attention on Amtrak’s stalled effort to obtain the nearly $1 billion needed to replace the creaky bridge.


    A sparking wire set the wood fenders under the bridge ablaze in May 2005, disrupting Amtrak
    and New Jersey Transit service on the Northeast Corridor.
    Bill Kostroun/Associated Press


    Each day, about 450 trains carry more than 150,000 riders over the Portal, a fragile choke point that crosses the Hackensack River halfway between Manhattan and Newark.

    Every time its center section opens to let a tugboat push a barge full of sludge downriver, there is a reasonable chance that a lot of people will be late for work — or dinner — with delays radiating out from Pennsylvania Station in New York and stretching from the nation’s capital to Massachusetts.

    When the bridge’s name is uttered in official announcements or in email alerts, riders know that frustration lies just around the bend.

    “If you’re on the train and they say Portal Bridge, you know you’d better make other plans,” said Patrick Williams, who commutes to Midtown Manhattan from Long Branch, N.J. “It usually means big delays for thousands of people.”


    In November 1996, a northbound Amtrak train derailed and sideswiped another train right after crossing the Portal Bridge.
    Bill Kostroun/Associated Press


    Most of those delays are measured in minutes, but when serious problems arise, the backups can last for hours. That is what happened twice over the summer when the bridge failed to swing back into place, delaying trains for as long as 45 minutes during the evening rush.

    A few weeks earlier, wooden fenders beneath the bridge caught fire just after 6:30 p.m., forcing Amtrak officials to cut power to the bridge. In the 70 minutes it took to extinguish the fire and reopen the bridge, 31 trains had been delayed and an additional 21 had been canceled. Commutes to New Jersey suburbs that would take just over an hour took three hours.

    The bridge is largely made of steel, but it has burned before: In 2005, a sparking wire set the fenders ablaze, shutting down all train travel on Amtrak’s mainline in the region overnight.

    Within Amtrak, which owns and operates it, the Portal is known as the “Achilles’ heel of the Northeast Corridor,” said Drew Galloway, assistant vice president for planning and development.

    “There are maintenance crews there around the clock. But you can only do so much to a century-old swing bridge.”


    A rendering for a renovated Portal Bridge.
    HNTB


    For something built in 1910, Mr. Galloway said, “structurally, it probably is in reasonable condition.” But, he added, its mechanical and electrical systems are “reaching the end of their useful lives.”

    Indeed, the bridge, expected to last 100 years, is swinging on borrowed time. Federal transportation officials have recognized its precarious state for many years, and they have a plan to replace it with a two-track bridge tall enough for boats to pass under it.

    But that plan carries an estimated price of $900 million, none of which has been lined up yet. Mr. Galloway said Amtrak was pushing the project, with New Jersey Transit as its local partner. New Jersey Transit, which operates commuter trains and buses throughout the state, split the $32 million cost of the preliminary engineering of a replacement with Amtrak and also paid $12 million for its final design.

    When the governor of New Jersey, Chris Christie, a Republican, announced that New Jersey Transit was canceling its plan to build rail tunnels under the Hudson River to Manhattan, he criticized Democratic elected officials for failing to include funding for a new Portal Bridge in that project. In 2011, Mr. Christie said he had let federal officials know that New Jersey was prepared to contribute a “significant amount of money” toward a new bridge.

    “There can’t be high-speed rail between New York and Washington without a change at the Portal Bridge,” Mr. Christie said then.

    In fact, since a train derailed on it on a Saturday morning in late 1996, the Portal Bridge has lowered the speed of trains approaching and leaving New York to 60 miles per hour. Several cars of that train, which was carrying mail, wound up falling from the tracks into the marsh below. No one was killed, but 43 passengers and crew members on two trains were injured.

    Federal investigators determined the cause was a failure to return the rails to the right position after the bridge swung open for a tugboat. Before an opening, the tracks on the bridge’s deck must be raised so they can safely swing over the fixed segments that lead up to them. Getting the tracks lined up again has proved so tricky, and the traffic over the Portal is so heavy, that the Coast Guard has limited the times of day when boats can request an opening.

    Bill Sheehan, the founder of Hackensack Riverkeeper, an environmental advocacy group, described the Portal as “decrepit” and said he favored the plan for a taller bridge, even though commercial use on the river had declined over the years.

    The only regular river traffic comes from the tugs that push barges of sludge from the Bergen County Utilities Authority complex in Little Ferry to a sewage treatment plant in Newark, Mr. Sheehan said. But with its deck just 23 feet above the mean high water line of the river, the bridge is too low for even a fishing boat with a flying bridge to pass under, he said.

    “The problem with this 100-year-old bridge is when something breaks, they literally have to go back to the machine shop and make a new part,” Mr. Sheehan said. “There isn’t a Bridges ‘R’ Us that has what they need.”

    http://www.nytimes.com/2014/09/26/ny...=nyregion&_r=0

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