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Thread: New Jersey Transit

  1. #16
    King Omega XVI OmegaNYC's Avatar
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    This sucks.... It is all ready a $4.75 ride from Paterson to Manhattan. The last thing I need is to take one of those dollar vans to the city. Those people drive nuts!

  2. #17
    Chief Antagonist Ninjahedge's Avatar
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    They went up just a short time ago, didn't they?

    I know they need this kind of thing, but the one thing I am wondering about is with a service that is FULL coming from Hoboken (one bus every 5 minutes) and one of teh shortest round trips out theer for bus travel, what warrants the increase for some areas like that?

    If I have to pay that much of an increase (probably $80 a month) I think I will just strap on the blades and take the PATH train again ($42 a month).

    Why pay more for something only marginally more convenient?

    ($38/mo x 12mo = $458 a year pre-transit = approximately $300 a year after taxes. Nothing to sneeze at.).

    They should always look to keep alternate forms of mass transit on equal footing when it comes to cost allocation/assignments.

  3. #18
    Jersey Patriot JCMAN320's Avatar
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    Thumbs up New commuter line for Hudson County

    From the Jersey Journal:

    Kearny rail line to return

    Wednesday, January 24, 2007

    KEARNY - Municipal officials have struck a tentative deal with NJ Transit to construct a passenger train station somewhere in the area of the Bergen Avenue extension, which opened east of Schuyler Avenue last year.

    The town received confirmation of NJ Transit's plans last month in a letter from George Warrington, the transit agency's executive director.

    In the letter, Warrington detailed preliminary plans to rebuild the Harrison-Kingsland Rail Line, a defunct line running along the eastern border of Gunnell Oval, and construct a new station near Bergen Avenue.

    The rail line, which would open sometime between 2010 and 2013, would initially lead to the Secaucus Junction station, where passengers could transfer to trains bound for Manhattan and other locations in New Jersey. Eventually, the Harrison-Kingsland line would travel through a new tunnel to be constructed under the Hudson River to connect with Manhattan's Penn Station.

    The $7.2 billion tunnel is slated for completion sometime in 2016, although transit officials have yet to line up full funding for the project.

    ROSE DUGER

  4. #19

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    WOW! This is big news. I never understood why they abandonned that line when they finished the Montclair connection. Glad to hear about this.

  5. #20

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    ^ Now you can settle in for the ten year wait.

  6. #21

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    I decided to start early and take my number as soon as they abandonned the line

  7. #22
    Jersey Patriot JCMAN320's Avatar
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    Talking Going Green!

    From a Lehigh Valley newspaper called The Morning Call:

    Pocono rail line across New Jersey gets 'green' light
    Study shows no impact on environment from New York service

    By Matt Birkbeck Of The Morning Call

    The 20-year effort to restore passenger rail service from New York to the Poconos is a step closer to reality now that a final study has determined there are no environmental issues blocking federal approval, New Jersey Transit officials said Thursday.

    Laying 88 miles of track from Port Morris, N.J., through the Poconos to Scranton, and operating the line from Pennsylvania to Hoboken, N.J., and New York City won't affect air quality, water or the land, said officials who presented the rail plan and environmental assessment study at a public hearing in Stroudsburg.

    The study shows the rail line will have no significant impact on the environment,'' said Jeffrey Stiles of Edwards and Kelcey, a consulting firm that conducted the study for New Jersey Transit, the state's public transportation corporation.

    The environmental review is the final study required by the Federal Transit Administration, which is expected to determine later this year whether it will fund a portion of the estimated $550 million project.

    Stiles said the service, if funding is approved this year, could be running by 2012 and would transport 6,700 riders daily from the Poconos to Hoboken and New York. ''Once the project is in the federal pipeline, it will take five years before trains are moving,'' Stiles said.

    Fueled by continued population growth in Monroe County, now at 175,000 and expected to rise to 275,000 by 2030, Pennsylvania and New Jersey have quietly worked on resurrecting a service terminated in 1973.

    The growing population in the Poconos has flooded Interstate 80 and other roads in New Jersey, which have suffered worsening congestion from Monroe County residents commuting to jobs in the metro New York region. In addition, New Jersey faces the loss of billions in highway funding unless it meets, by 2010, air quality improvements set by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency under the Clean Air Act.

    Unable to build costly new highways, New Jersey and Pennsylvania have sought alternatives to getting cars off the roads, and the passenger rail project has become a priority for both states.

    Jack Kanarek, senior director of project development for New Jersey Transit, said the project enjoys the support of New Jersey Gov. John Corzine and Pennsylvania Gov. Ed Rendell, and New Jersey has committed ''some'' money to the project.

    Last summer, President Bush signed a transportation bill that authorized $120 million for the project. Under funding guidelines for new rail service under the FTA's New Starts program, the FTA could fund up to 50 percent of the project, while the two states must fund the remainder. Rendell has set aside $40 million for the project.

    Just how much each state would contribute has not been decided, Kanarek said, though officials from New Jersey Transit and the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation have held several meetings.

    Despite New Jersey's pressing problems with congestion and air quality caused by cars, the environmental study determined that the majority of the ridership of the new service, 87 percent, would come from Pennsylvania. The study says rail service would remove nearly 3,000 cars from New Jersey's roads.

    The funding issue must be ironed out as part of an operating agreement between the two states before final approval by the FTA, Kanarek said.

    Once completed, the service would be operated by New Jersey Transit, with nine round trips daily into New Jersey and New York from four rail stations in Monroe County, at Delaware Water Gap, East Stroudsburg, Analomink and Mount Pocono, and one in Scranton.

    Estimated travel time from Delaware Water Gap to Hoboken is nearly two hours, with a portion of the rail line running through Northampton County near Portland. There also would be two new rail stations in New Jersey, in Andover and Blairstown, with the Andover station serving as a connector to direct service into New York's Penn Station.

    Lawrence Malski, chief operating officer of the Pennsylvania Northeast Regional Railroad Authority who has worked on the project for more than a decade, said he was pleased to finally reach a point where the project might become a reality.

    ''This is the last big hurdle,'' Malski said. ''And it's sorely needed. You can't drive on I-80 since it's getting worse and worse.''

    Kanarek said the rail project is one of many projects under consideration by New Jersey Transit, which will begin a feasibility study later this year on extending train service to Phillipsburg that could support service from Lehigh Valley commuters.

    ''We already have one study under way and will use those results to begin a study on the I-78 corridor, which includes a detailed feasibility study of rail service to Phillipsburg,'' Kanarek said.

    Bruce Davis, a co-founder of the Route 22 Coalition, which is supporting a $200 million, 3.5-mile widening of Route 22 from 15th Street in Allentown to Lehigh Valley International Airport, said he ''encourages'' a rail link in Phillipsburg. But he cautioned supporters of a rail link into the Lehigh Valley, citing the years it took Poconos officials to get their project to its present status.

  8. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by JCMAN320 View Post
    Estimated travel time from Delaware Water Gap to Hoboken is nearly two hours
    If this were built anywhere in Europe it would be high speed. What's the matter with us?

  9. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by ablarc View Post
    If this were built anywhere in Europe it would be high speed. What's the matter with us?
    Too many rednecks?

  10. #25

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    ^ Does New Jersey have rednecks?

  11. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by ablarc View Post
    If this were built anywhere in Europe it would be high speed. What's the matter with us?
    Not even in Europe (or Japan) would you get HSR on these back water routes. Although that would probably differ on how you define HSR as I've noticed a few North Americans refer to speeds that are commonly referred to as being HSR, are really not much different from the average modern European commuter train speed.

    What you really need to get rid of though are those Soviet battle trains hauling people around. Over 3hrs to get to Manhattan from Montauk...

  12. #27

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    Quote Originally Posted by ablarc View Post
    ^ Does New Jersey have rednecks?
    Mass transit programs are always under-funded and under-supported in this country. NJ would likely receive less of a grant (and support) for such a program from Washington than, say, if it was to expand Interstate 80.

  13. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by ablarc View Post
    If this were built anywhere in Europe it would be high speed. What's the matter with us?

    this is only speculation, but part of this regions lack of true, european style high speed rail has to do with our exisiting rail infrastructure and exisitng rail routes. High speed rail thrives on long straightaways, with wide curves when needed. Northeast rail routes tend to meander, and this affects speed (the Acela route from Boston to New York famously makes the equivelent of something like 13 full circles during the trip).

    However, there are small examples of what can be done to increase travel time - like replacing wooden track ties with concrete ones, or making the overhead catenary wires super taut. Pennsylvania has actually been pretty successful with this, as they've made the Harrisburg to Philadelphia route the 2nd High Speed corridor in the country (High speed should be taken with a grain of salt, as it only allows for a max speed of 110mph - but still, it's a start)

  14. #29

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    Also, this looks like it'll be built as a commuter line, not an inter-city express. That mean lots of stops along the way.

  15. #30
    Jersey Patriot JCMAN320's Avatar
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    Angry Raised up?!

    Bus, light rail riders to see fare increase

    NJ Transit bus riders can expect a 10 percent increase and passengers on the Hudson-Bergen Light Rail will see fares go up over 8 percent, the agency's executive director said today.

    Commuters may see an overall fare hike of nearly 10 percent beginning in June, with different increases for different rail and bus lines.

    NJ Transit Executive Director George D. Warrington offered a detailed breakdown of the proposed fare increase, the first since July 2005, at a meeting of the agency's board of directors today.

    Pending approval from the board in April, the hike would begin on June 1 and close a budget deficit of about $60 million in the agency's proposed $1.5 billion budget.

    Among the changes:

    -Local bus routes would increase 9.9 percent and base one-zone rides would increase from $1.25 to $1.35 and base one-zone passes would increase from $45 to $49 in northern New Jersey and from $41 to $45 in southern New Jersey.

    -The base fare on the Hudson-Bergen Light Rail would increase from $1.75 to $1.90 and the base pass rise from $53 to $58.

    -A 9.9 percent increase for rail and interstate bus customers who ride from New Jersey to New York or Philadelphia and longer-distance buses between suburbs and urban areas.

    -Fares for the New York-Meadowlands Sports Complex bus purchased on board would increase from $5 to $6 and fares purchased from ticket windows or vending machines would increase from $4.50 to $5.

    Warrington said increase would also pay for new and expanded service, such as new multilevel rail cars and additional parking spaces.

    NJ Transit will hold more than a dozen public hearings this month and next and written comments will be accepted through March 8.

    Fares cover about 44 percent of NJ Transit's operating expenses, and the rest is picked up mostly by the state.

    Warrington said fares did not increase for 12 years during the 1990s.

    "During that period, the underlying annual operating need to fund inflation, extraordinary cost growth and new service was masked with a steady diet of increased transfers from the capital budget to cover operating expenses,'' he said.

    Associated Press

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