Page 1 of 7 12345 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 95

Thread: Medicinal Marijuana

  1. #1
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    NYC - Downtown
    Posts
    32,654

    Default Medicinal Marijuana

    It seems that the laws against use of marijuana for medicinal purposes will not be lifted anytime soon based on the June 2005 Supreme Court decision wherein the Court ruled (as reported by CNN at http://www.cnn.com/2005/LAW/06/06/sc...cal.marijuana/):

    "doctors can be blocked from prescribing marijuana for patients suffering from pain caused by cancer or other serious illnesses."

    Read on to inform yourself of the lengths to which our public "servants" (i.e.: judges) will go to punish those who make the personal choice to use marijuana to alleviate pain:


    She's Not the Only One Who's Retchin

    September 23, 2005
    http://www.reason.com/hitandrun/2005/09/shes_not_the_on_1.shtml#011093


    This week the family of Jonathan Magbie, a 27-year-old quadriplegic who died of acute respiratory failure a year ago while serving time in the D.C. jail on a marijuana charge, sued the city and Greater Southeast Community Hospital for inadequately treating the breathing problems he experienced while in custody. Magbie, who was paralyzed from the neck down in a car accident at age 4, smoked marijuana to relieve the pain associated with his condition. Although he was convicted of possessing just one joint and was eligible for probation, D.C. Superior Court Judge Judith E. Retchin sentenced him to 10 days, partly because he said he planned to continue smoking marijuana. Retchin, who was not named in the suit, said she tried to ensure that the jail was equipped to care for Magbie, who used a ventilator, which the jail did not have, to assist his breathing at night. An official investigation found that, due to "failures of communication," the assurances Retchin received concerned the ability of a federal prison to care for a paraplegic, rather than the ability of the local jail to care for a quadriplegic. The Marijuana Policy Project says Congress shares the blame for Magbie's death, since it overrode a D.C. ballot initiative that would have protected patients like him from prosecution for marijuana possession.


    Posted by Jacob Sullum at September 23, 2005 03:22 PM

  2. #2
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    NYC - Downtown
    Posts
    32,654

    Default

    More on the Supreme Court decision and background on this case, Ashcroft v. Raich / Gonzalez v. Raich:

    http://www.counterpunch.org/gardner11272004.html

    http://www.mpp.org/raich/

    http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn...060600564.html

    A Defeat For Users Of Medical Marijuana

    State Laws No Defense, Supreme Court Rules

    By Charles Lane
    Washington Post Staff Writer
    Tuesday, June 7, 2005; Page A01

    The Supreme Court dealt a blow to the medical marijuana movement yesterday, ruling that the federal government can still ban possession of the drug in states that have eliminated sanctions for its use in treating symptoms of illness.

    By a vote of 6 to 3, the court ruled that Congress's constitutional authority to regulate the interstate market in drugs, licit or illicit, extends to small, homegrown quantities of doctor-recommended marijuana consumed under California's Compassionate Use Act, which was adopted by an overwhelming majority of voters in 1996.


    ************************************************** ******


    There is also a prior thread at wirednewyork that discusses this case in the broader sense as it relates to "Commerce": http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/sh...56&postcount=1

  3. #3
    Forum Veteran
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Brooklyn
    Posts
    1,278

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Law & Order
    Score.
    What's your problem with the medical marijuana use? Pretty callous reply to a thread about a guy who pretty much died because of the pointless and bizarre prosecution of a consentual crime.

  4. #4
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    NYC - Downtown
    Posts
    32,654

    Default

    ^ I guess the name "Law & Order" says it all. I think you've carried too far in this case.

    Some laws are ridiculous. To obey those types of laws just because they are written doesn't necessarily serve society as a whole and certainly doesn't serve the individual, as this case so clearly shows.

    Please tell me how this individual's personal use of a plant caused harm to anyone else.

    And please: don't tell me that if he had obeyed the law he would still be alive. No one knows that. But it does seem that if he hadn't been found with one joint and declared his need to use it to minimize his on-going pain then he might still be alive. Yet nothing justifies the fact that he was consigned to a slow and agonizing death -- which was the fate delivered to him by the judge and other's in charge of his safe-keeping.

  5. #5

    Default

    Magbie was paralized from the neck down and they put him in jail? Could not they just chain his wheelchair to a table in his apartment? Or was he considered flight risk?

    Heck, that will teach him a lesson. Not like he was benefiting society anyways.

  6. #6

    Default

    Pot vending machines take root in L.A.
    Machines distribute the drug to people with cards authorizing use



    Los Angeles medical-cannabis dispensary owner Vincent Mehdizadeh poses
    with his new Marijuana vending machine installed at the Herbal Nutrition
    Center in Los Angeles Tuesday.


    The Associated Press
    updated 7:01 a.m. ET, Wed., Jan. 30, 2008


    LOS ANGELES - The city that popularized the fast food drive-thru has a new innovation: 24-hour medical marijuana vending machines.

    Patients suffering from chronic pain, loss of appetite and other ailments that marijuana is said to alleviate can get their pot with a dose of convenience at the Herbal Nutrition Center, where a large machine will dole out the drug around the clock.

    "Convenient access, lower prices, safety, anonymity," inventor and owner Vincent Mehdizadeh said, extolling the benefits of the machine.

    But federal drug agents say the invention may need unplugging.

    "Somebody owns (it), it's on a property and somebody fills it," said DEA Special Agent Jose Martinez. "Once we find out where it's at, we'll look into it and see if they're violating laws."

    At least three dispensaries in the city, including two belonging to Mehdizadeh, have installed vending machines to distribute the drug to people who carry cards authorizing marijuana use.

    Mehdizadeh said he spent seven months to develop and patent the black, armored box, which he calls the "PVM," or prescription vending machine.

    Convenience and privacy
    A sliding fence protects the tinted windows of his dispensary, barely distinguishing it from a busy thoroughfare of strip malls, automobile dealers and furniture shops. A box resembling a large refrigerator stands inside the nearly empty shop, near a few shelves stocked with vitamins and herbs.

    A guard in a black T-shirt emblazoned with the word "Security" on the front stands at the door. A poster of Bob Marley decorates a back room.

    The computerized machine requires fingerprint identification and a prepaid card with a magnetic stripe. Once the card and fingerprint are verified, a bright green envelope with the pot drops down a slot.

    Mehdizadeh says any user approved for medical marijuana and registered in a computer database at his dispensaries can pre-purchase the drug and then use the machine to pick up.

    The process provides convenience and privacy for users who may otherwise feel uncomfortable about buying marijuana, Mehdizadeh said.

    At the Timothy Leary Medical Dispensary in the San Fernando Valley, the vending machine is accessible only during business hours. An employee there said the machine was introduced about five months ago, and provides speedy service.

    "It helps a lot of patients who are in a lot of pain and don't want to wait around to get help," Robert Schwartz said. "It's been working out great."

    Mehdizadeh said he sought the advice of doctors, and decided to limit the amount of marijuana per user to an ounce per week. Each purchase from the machine yields 1/8th or 2/8th of an ounce. By eliminating a vendor behind the counter, he said, the machine offers users lower drug prices. The 1/8th ounce packet would cost about $40 — $20 lower than the average price at other dispensaries.

    'It's to medicate'
    A spokesman for a marijuana advocacy group said the machine also benefits dispensary owners.

    "It limits the number of workers in the store in the event of a raid, and it'll make it harder for theft," said Nathan Sands, of The Compassionate Coalition.

    Marijuana use is illegal under federal law, which does not recognize the medical marijuana laws in California and 11 other states.

    The Drug Enforcement Agency and other federal agencies have been actively shutting down major medical marijuana dispensaries throughout the state over the last two years and charging their operators with felony distribution charges.

    Mehdizadeh said the Herbal Nutrition Center was the target of a federal raid in December. He said no arrests were made and no charges have been filed against him.

    Kris Hermes, a spokesman for advocacy group Americans for Safe Access, said the machine might benefit those who already know how much and what strain of marijuana they're looking for. But he said others will want to see and smell the drug before they buy it.

    A man who said he has been authorized to use medical marijuana as part of his anger management therapy said the vending machine's security measures would at least protect against illicit use of the drug.

    "You have kids that want to get high and that's not what marijuana is for," Robert Miko said. "It's to medicate."

    *****

    BBC Video:
    How the marijuana-dispensing vending machine works

  7. #7

    Default This, will not -- stand... man

    UN board says marijuana machines illegal

    Fri Feb 8, 4:49 PM ET
    VIENNA, Austria - Marijuana vending machines in Los Angeles violate international treaties and should be shut down, the U.N.-affiliated drug control board said Friday.

    "The International Narcotics Control Board is deeply concerned about reports that computerized vending machines to dispense cannabis (marijuana) have been put into operation in Los Angeles," Philip O. Emafo, president of the board, said in a statement.

    At least three Los Angeles medical marijuana dispensaries have installed vending machines to distribute the drug to people who carry cards authorizing marijuana use. The drug is said to alleviate chronic pain, loss of appetite and other ailments.

    Supporters say the machines, which dispense 1/8th or 2/8th of an ounce of marijuana at a time, offers users lower drug prices and increases security.

    Marijuana use is illegal under U.S. law, which does not recognize the medical marijuana laws in California and 11 other states.

    The Drug Enforcement Agency and other U.S. agencies have been shutting down major medical marijuana dispensaries throughout California in the last two years and charging their operators with felony distribution charges.

    "We know that the use of cannabis is illegal under federal law of the United States and we trust the authorities will stop such activities, which contravene the international drug control treaties," Emafo said.

    In its statement, the Vienna-based drug board also said scientific research about the therapeutic usefulness of cannabis or cannabis extracts was still in progress and had not produced much evidence.

    The board is an independent monitoring body for the implementation of the United Nations international drug control conventions.

  8. #8

    Default

    I can't believe that the courts can't see that there are people that use this NATURAL drug to help them with the severe pain of illnesses that are slowly killing them. It's okay to prescrive Vicodin to people that have a tooth pulled but a person going through radiation can't ease their pain?????? I mean all these pain killers that are given out make you loopy too, so what's to say they won't ban those in the future also?

  9. #9

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by voodoochild View Post
    I mean all these pain killers that are given out make you loopy too, so what's to say they won't ban those in the future also?
    Too much money in it.

  10. #10

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Encideyamind View Post
    Too much money in it.
    You're right, and that is exactly what I an saying. Our system would rather allow people to suffer because they are not making enough money and keep around othercontrolled substances that do. So mant kids today are ADDICTED to pain killers but doctors keep writing those scripts with out any problems.

  11. #11

    Default

    Essentially they are doing the same thing with our food. Allowing or even time suggesting we injest things that are extremely harmful for our longterm health.

    Keep people ill and you'll have customers for life...

  12. #12

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Encideyamind View Post
    Essentially they are doing the same thing with our food. Allowing or even time suggesting we injest things that are extremely harmful for our longterm health.

    Keep people ill and you'll have customers for life...
    Amen brother! So disgusting people are.

  13. #13
    Chief Antagonist Ninjahedge's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Rutherford
    Posts
    12,773

    Default

    Whatever.


    The thing that gets me is all the money that is being spent on fighting this "scourge" when all it does is boost the price of it up.

    BTW, as for it being "natural", don't get on that schtick. Lots of things are "natural" and that does not make them any better for you than "artificial". A snakebite is still a snakebite, and Heroin, a natural derivitive/product of poppies, is a life sucker. MOST of our drugs start from natural sources, even the perscription meds, so just be careful when taking that angle in an argument/defense of MJ.

    Bottom line is, is this a substance that causes enough problems in the US to spend as much time, money and effort as we do to "fix" it?

  14. #14
    The Dude Abides
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    NYC - Financial District
    Posts
    4,418

    Default

    Oh please, Ninja. That natural/unnatural argument is nonsense.

    To answer your question: positively NO.

  15. #15
    Chief Antagonist Ninjahedge's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Rutherford
    Posts
    12,773

    Thumbs down

    Quote Originally Posted by pianoman11686 View Post
    Oh please, Ninja. That natural/unnatural argument is nonsense.

    To answer your question: positively NO.
    Oh please, if you think that "natural" is healthy you are listening to nonsense.

    It is the latest marketing fad. Most of the worlds drugs, medicines, and poisons all are or have had natural roots, so to start screaming "Science is evil" at anything on the basis of pulling it from the ground versus pulling it from a test tube is just plain paranoia.

Page 1 of 7 12345 ... LastLast

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  


Google+ - Facebook - Twitter - Meetup

Edward's photos on Flickr - Wired New York on Flickr - In Queens - In Red Hook - Bryant Park - SQL Backup Software