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Thread: Transportation from/to New York airports

  1. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by BPC
    If you love or even just like this girlfriend, you will not have her schlep out from LaGuardia to Newark to meet you, after a flight from Norway(!), when the two of you will be staying in Brooklyn. Just meet her at your hotel, or if it is before the hotel's check-in time, than have her drop off the bags and meet you at a nearby cafe. Newark Airport is nowhere near Brooklyn.
    Hehe It's the other way around. She's landing on Newark before me (4pm), and will be travelling to La Gurdia to meet me (11pm). I suggested that she travel to the hotel and rest there after the long day with jetlag and everything, but she wanted to meet me at the airport (we haven't seen each other for 5 months at that point).

    And yes, I love her

    Quote Originally Posted by BPC
    Cabs to and from Newark are more expensive than LaGuardia, because you are crossing state lines and such. Ask your hotel to recommend a reasonably priced car service for you. Should be about $40.
    Good suggestion!

    By the way: The hotel's on 980 Wyckoff Ave (Red Carpet Inn).

  2. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by miceagol

    By the way: The hotel's on 980 Wyckoff Ave (Red Carpet Inn).
    Wow, a visitor staying in Bushwick.

    Anyway, take the airtrain! then go from the A to the L. easy. 2 dollars!

  3. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by HarlemRep
    Wow, a visitor staying in Bushwick.
    Is that bad or good?

  4. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by miceagol
    Is that bad or good?
    Not bad or good, just uncommon.

    Bushwick is a resurgent neighborhood that's had a reputation for crime and decay in the past, but it's gradually been getting better. Though crime is down exponentially compared to 15 years ago, it still has a bit of an edge to it (there have been 14 murders in the 83rd Precinct this year compared to 12 in all of 2001, but they're still down 30% compared to last year and down 73% compared to 1990).

    http://www.nyc.gov/html/nypd/pdf/chfdept/cs083pct.pdf

    Use common sense, though, and you should be all right.

  5. #20

    Default Newark Airport to Midtown Manhattan

    Hi Everyone,
    I am yet another first time visitor to NYC. Flying into Newark in April with my family. I thought we'd get a taxi to our hotel and was wondering if the taxis will take 4 adults + one case each, or should we be looking for something bigger? The taxi certainly looks easier than the train.

    Thanks
    Chris

  6. #21

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    Taxis take 4 people and luggage, no problem

  7. #22

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    So if i'm flying into JFK, and am looking for a transfer to right near the Empire State, then i'm best getting a taxi?? Was thinking about booking a bus ($15 one-way) until i read this.

  8. #23
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    MUFC- if you're traveling alone and don't have much baggage, the airport bus from the terminal to grand central is a good option for you. Much faster than the subway (and so much more pleasant) and less than 10 blocks from the Empire State (15-20 minute walk).

    If you are traveling with a group, a cab makes more sense - same price as 3-4 bus tickets and much more convenient as it will drop you right at the door of your destination.

  9. #24

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    Cheers Ryan. I'm travelling with my girlfriend, so you think that it's worth an extra $20 to go door to door?? (based on the fact that a cab would be $50 inc tip??)

  10. #25
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    If you're coming over in the winter months and there's the possiblity of cold, nasty weather then door to door would be worth the extra $20 ....

  11. #26
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    I wouldn't do it b/c personally don't like cabs, and I don't mind the walk. If you're ok with the walk, I say take the bus... unless it's raining... or you have a lot of luggage.

  12. #27
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    Last year I visited NYC and used AirTrain to get to the city. The fare to get to Manhattan is only $7 (subway fare is included). You can buy that Metrocard when you get to Howard Beach Station. Then just take the A train to Manhattan. Personally, I think it`s a more convenient way of getting to the city than using a cab. And it`s a lot cheaper.

    www.airtrainjfk.com

  13. #28

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    http://www.nytimes.com/2006/02/06/ny...06chopper.html
    February 6, 2006
    New Helicopter Service Promises Wall St. to J.F.K., in 9 Minutes
    By PATRICK McGEEHAN

    As soon as next month, travelers could be boarding helicopters at the foot of Wall Street and flying straight to Kennedy International Airport, zipping past city traffic and also past other passengers waiting to clear security at the airport.

    That service, which will cost more than $140 each way, is being arranged by a start-up company and the federal government. The Transportation Security Administration, a division of the Department of Homeland Security, is setting up screening equipment for passengers and luggage at the Downtown Manhattan Heliport, making it the first heliport in the country to be "federalized," said Ann Davis, a spokeswoman for the administration.

    Within a few months, the security administration plans to install a similar checkpoint at the heliport at the east end of 34th Street, Ms. Davis said. Each heliport will have at least eight screeners and the full complement of scanning and bomb-detection equipment used at airports, all provided by the federal government, she said.

    The checkpoints will allow customers of the U.S. Helicopter Corporation to check themselves and their bags through to their final destination, be it Chicago or Shanghai, said Jerry Murphy, chief executive of the company. In eight or nine minutes, the helicopters will whisk passengers straight to a gate at the airport, where they can walk right onto their planes, he said. Their bags will be loaded directly onto the aircraft.

    The service's appeal will be "selective," said Charles A. Gargano, the vice chairman of the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, which operates the downtown heliport. He said the customers would be executives "in the financial community and downtown" who want to save the time it can take to ride to the airport and go through security.

    U.S. Helicopter plans to begin operating in mid-March with 12 hourly flights from downtown to the American Airlines terminal at J.F.K., Mr. Murphy said. It hopes to reach agreements soon to deliver passengers to other airlines. Its Sikorsky helicopters can carry as many as 12 passengers, and it expects to have three of them initially, Mr. Murphy said, giving it a capacity of fewer than 500 outbound passengers a day.

    By contrast, about 50,000 travelers pass through security screening each day at Kennedy, according to the Port Authority. The security administration plans to spend $560,000 this year to set up and operate the checkpoint at the Wall Street heliport, on Pier 6 in the East River, Ms. Davis said.

    Creating a checkpoint at the East 34th Street Heliport will cost about the same, she said. Ms. Davis added, "It was our decision that based on U.S. Helicopter's business model, it would be of benefit to us to provide resources to these two heliports."

    To supply the screeners at the heliports, the administration will have to reduce staffing at airports because Congress has limited their number nationwide to 45,000 since 2002. Some Congressional Democrats have argued for a lifting of that cap, calling it arbitrary and counterproductive, but it remains in place.

    To stay within the limit, the security administration reassigns positions as it federalizes additional airports. The administration manages security at about 450 airports but, so far, no heliports, Ms. Davis said.

    In July, it decided to reduce the maximum number of screeners at the region's three largest airports, Kennedy, La Guardia and Newark Liberty International, to 3,542 from 3,791, a decrease of 6.5 percent. That drew protests from officials at the Port Authority, which operates the three airports. They argued that more screeners were needed because in recent years passenger traffic at the airports has been rising.

    Though some of the 16 employees the administration expects to place at the Manhattan heliports might otherwise be screening passengers at one of the three airports, Mr. Gargano said he approved of the plan.

    "Well, why not? It's not costing the Port Authority anything," he said. "Adding another mode of transportation to the airports is a good thing."

    He said the service could help reinvigorate the economy of Lower Manhattan and was in keeping with the ultimate plan of providing a faster trip from downtown to Kennedy. Mr. Gargano, like his political patron, Gov. George E. Pataki, has been an advocate of a rail link from the Wall Street area to the airport. Having helicopter service, he said, would not obviate the need for the train.

    "You're talking about different levels of riders," he said. "The number of people moving this way is not going to be great."

    Still, U.S. Helicopter does have big dreams. The company hopes to have scheduled service between all three public heliports in Manhattan the third is at the west end of 30th Street and the three big airports within a year. Then, according to documents the company filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission, it hopes to add service in other cities.

    Doing so would require a lot more capital, agreements with more airlines and federal security checkpoints at several more heliports. Mr. Murphy of U.S. Helicopter said the company had raised $19 million, $6 million of it from investors in Kuwait and Saudi Arabia. In New York City, there has been no scheduled helicopter shuttle service to the airports in almost 20 years, aviation officials said. The concept had its heyday in the 1970's and 1980's, when Pan American and New York Airways provided service from heliports, including one atop the Pan Am building, now the MetLife Building.

    The rooftop helipad was closed in 1977 after a spinning rotor broke loose on a New York Airways helicopter and killed five people, including a woman on the street below. Helicopter service to Kennedy from the East Side and downtown heliports continued until Pan Am ran into financial trouble in the mid-1980's.

    Mr. Murphy, who was chief executive of Kiwi Airlines, which is now defunct, said he expected U.S. Helicopter to carry as many as 160,000 passengers in its first year. Initially, the one-way fare will be $139, plus taxes and fees, but it will rise to $159 within weeks, he said. He said the company planned to start selling tickets this week at its Web site, www.flyush.com.

    "We believe that the majority of our customers will be the people that fly airplanes on a very high-frequency basis," Mr. Murphy said. Most of those people already travel to the airports by livery cars that charge $85 or more but can take 45 minutes, compared with 8 or 9 minutes in a helicopter, he said.

  14. #29
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    Default EWR to JFK

    Somehow we made flight plans to arrive at EWR and 4 hours later to leave from JFK .... all on around 5pm on a Sunday night. Yes, I know the AirTrain/subway/AirTrain is the cheapest, but somehow dragging luggage on the MTA and having to make 3 different connections doesn't really appeal to the wife. And no, we are not yet rich enough to afford the $150+ taxi/supershuttle fee to go that way.

    Any suggestions or recommendations for some means of transportation which is reasonable, can be accomplished by an ex-NYCer (50 years ago!!), certain to get us there on time, and safe?

    Appreciate it. larrych

  15. #30

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    2 cabs: Take the NJ cab into the City ($35-40), and then as soon as you emerge from the Holland Tunnel, hop out at the Police Station right there on the roundabout and hail an NYC cab to JFK ($50-55). That comes to a lot less than $150. If you ask the NJ cab in EWR to go all the way to JFK, you are keeping him out of NJ for a long while, and have to compensate him for the time and distance. The two-cab solution will run you about $90.

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