Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 42

Thread: Port Authority Capital plan (2006-2015)

  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    New Jersey
    Posts
    815

    Default Port Authority Capital plan (2006-2015)

    The Port Authority released a copy of their Capital Plan for 2006-2015, it lists both committed/Board Approved expenditures as well as canidate projects for Board Approval.

    Some highlights of Board Approved Airport projects:

    Kennedy Airport,
    Jetblue Terminal 5 $781 Million,

    Newark Airport,
    Terminal B modernization $268 Million

    Highlights of Canidate Airport Projects:

    Kennedy Airport,
    Rebuilding of Terminals 2, 3, 6 $750 Million

    Newark Airport,
    Terminal A modernization $1.2 Billion

    Laguardia Airport,
    Central Terminal Building Modernization $1 Billion

    New Regional Airport (4th passenger Airport)
    $1 Billion

    Board Approved Airport Transit projects:

    Laguardia Airport,
    Manhattan Ferry service $12 Million

    Kennedy Airport,
    Lower Manhattan Rail Link $53 Million

    Canidate Airport Transit Projects:

    Newark Airport,
    Additional Airtrain cars $57 Million, PATH extension to EWR $550 Million

    Kennedy Airport,
    Additional Airtrain cars $30 Million, Lower Manhattan Rail Link $1.5 Billion

    Rail connections amongst EWR, JFK LGA $2 Billion

    Express Rail to 4th Regional Airport $1.5 Billion

    http://www.panynj.com/AboutthePortAu...pital_proj.pdf

  2. #2

    Default

    UGH! Why are they waisting money on the lower Manhattan link. It is such a waste. They screwed JFK out of a one seat Manhattan rail ride when they built Airtrain.

    Glad to see the ferry was approved.

    I'm still wondering if Stewart Airport as the 4th major regional airport is such a hot idea.

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    New Jersey
    Posts
    815

    Default

    For some reason the Goethals bridge replacement project did not make their list of Capital Projects, but by no means does that mean it's not active in fact I would expect this project to get the Board's Approval within two years.

    http://www.goethalseis.com/

    Another project that did make the Capital Program list is the project to raise the height of the Bayonne Bridge, the Port Authority along with the Feds wants to spend $1 Billion Dollars to jack up the Bayonne bridge to allow taller Ship traffic to access Port Newark/Elizabeth and Howland Hook.

  4. #4

    Default

    What is this 4th regional airport?

  5. #5

    Default

    They're bitching about how JFK, LGA, and EWR are all packed to the brim. I say if they didn't have so many pointless short haul flights, some of the airports could fit more.

    Airports like MacArthur can hande the short haul flights. They're actually more qualified for it, IMO. Think about it. LGA is so close to Amtrak, so it competes directly with them. MacArthur is way out on the island, where even if Amtrak did run, would not be able to come close to being comparable travel time with an aircraft.

    Move the short hauls to MacArthur, which opens up more space at LGA atleast.

    Right now, they're looking at Stewart Airport as the new major regional airport. I think that MacArthur is a better candidate, but that's just my opinion. Along with making Stewart the new major regional airport, they want to put in a rail link, which will be a one seat ride to Manhattan if the Tappan Zee is rebuilt with the commuter rail option.

  6. #6
    I admit I have a problem
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    North Koreatown
    Posts
    532

    Default

    That PATH extension to Newark Airport sure would be useful. (And it would have been useful decades ago, too.) What will it take to get that project going?

    $1.50 gets you from Downtown or Herald Square to the airport ...

  7. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    New Jersey
    Posts
    815

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by 212
    That PATH extension to Newark Airport sure would be useful. (And it would have been useful decades ago, too.) What will it take to get that project going?

    $1.50 gets you from Downtown or Herald Square to the airport ...
    Plus the $5.00 Airtrain surcharge, so the actual fare would be like $6.50.

  8. #8

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by NIMBYkiller
    Right now, they're looking at Stewart Airport as the new major regional airport. I think that MacArthur is a better candidate, but that's just my opinion. Along with making Stewart the new major regional airport, they want to put in a rail link, which will be a one seat ride to Manhattan if the Tappan Zee is rebuilt with the commuter rail option.
    Mapquest gives current road travel time from Stewart to Port Authority Bus Terminal as 1hour and 25 minutes. That's for 71.24 miles travel distance on the Thruway, Garden State and Lincoln Tunnel, for an average travel speed of 50.3 miles per hour. We all know that when the Lincoln Tunnel and the roads leading to it are congested travel time is likely to be longer.

    Assuming that a train's travel distance could be about the same (say 71.24) in miles, it would have to cover the distance at an average speed of 95 mph to get you into Penn Station or Grand Central in a reasonable 45 minutes.

    Trains like that are fairly common in Europe and some places in Asia, but do we in this country still have the will (read "money") and the technological know-how to accomplish such a feat?

    .

  9. #9
    I admit I have a problem
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    North Koreatown
    Posts
    532

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by STT757
    Plus the $5.00 Airtrain surcharge, so the actual fare would be like $6.50.
    Ohhh, so the Airtrain surcharge is included in the NJ Transit fare of up to $14 one-way from Penn Station ... thanks, I hadn't realized.

  10. #10
    Crabby airline hostess - stache's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Nairobi Hilton
    Posts
    8,511

    Default

    I wish there was some way to get rid of having to transfer at Journal Square.

  11. #11

    Default

    I wouldn't count on 95 MPH at all. If anything I'd count on 45 MPH. The routing to GCT would be via the Tappan Zee. Certain sections I'm sure can be higher speeds, but a lot I fear will be fairly slow.

  12. #12

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by NIMBYkiller
    I wouldn't count on 95 MPH at all. If anything I'd count on 45 MPH.
    Then why bother with rail at all? Why not just leave it to buses?

  13. #13

    Default

    Rail isn't prone to the traffic jams that the buses would be. Still, I wouldn't doubt for a second that some company like Shortline will start a service connecting Stewart with PABT.

    Basically, the service I think is already proposed to exist from atleast Suffern, over the Tappan Zee, and down to GCT. They might as well just go ahead and run the trains further north on the Port Jervis line, and then on a new spur to the airport. The service isn't dedicated soley to the airport. It's for everyone along the line.

  14. #14
    Forum Veteran
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Garden City, LI
    Posts
    1,778

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by NIMBYkiller
    UGH! Why are they waisting money on the lower Manhattan link. It is such a waste. They screwed JFK out of a one seat Manhattan rail ride when they built Airtrain.

    Glad to see the ferry was approved.

    I'm still wondering if Stewart Airport as the 4th major regional airport is such a hot idea.
    I don't know why you are so against the downtown-JFK link. It makes total sense. There should be direct links from JFK and LGA from BOTH DT and MT. As an added benefit, hundreds of thousands of LI residents will shave over 20 min time getting downtown. I don't see the drawbacks at all.

    Are you for the LIRR east side access project?

  15. #15
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    NYC - Downtown
    Posts
    32,654

    Default

    Prying Open the Port Authority

    NY TIMES
    The City
    June 24, 2007

    The Twenties were just starting to roar when New York and New Jersey agreed to quit feuding over their mutual waterway, the one with the Statue of Liberty in its center. The two state governments created what is now called the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey. The treaty gave each governor the right to appoint half the agency’s board members.

    Since then, this strange organizational bird has been running the port, and over time has taken on the Lincoln and Holland tunnels, the George Washington Bridge, various bus terminals, and the Newark, La Guardia, Kennedy and Teterboro airports. The authority, which also owned the World Trade Center, now controls most of the complicated downtown reconstruction project, including the Calatrava PATH station, the memorial, the Freedom Tower and the foundations for other skyscrapers.

    Nevertheless, any agency that answers to two states too easily answers to nobody. And for years, this enormous authority with its $5 billion budget has operated in the shadows — its public business considered too important for the public to know much about.

    After Sept. 11, those running the authority started to change. Anthony Coscia, the new chairman as of 2003, began working to make open up the meetings and to de-mystify the authority’s day-to-day business operations. But a problem remains. Mr. Coscia holds his job by appointment, and what is done by the chairman can just as easily be undone by a less public-spirited successor.

    Gov. Eliot Spitzer of New York and Gov. Jon Corzine of New Jersey took a good first step toward reform last week, calling on the port to revise its bylaws to make its business more understandable to its millions of customers.

    Their proposal would require more open meetings and more transparent contracting and planning. Typically, in the past, a very expensive construction project would appear as one lump sum on the agenda. Now the public would be allowed to comment on item-by-item expenses, and for the first time would be able to see who is being awarded contracts and where the money is going.

    The new bylaws would also be designed to bar “inappropriate lobbying” of the authority, while other rules would tighten codes of ethics and governance in an effort, among other things, to prevent commissioners from passing along contracts to business or family connections.

    This is all very worthwhile. As Mr. Coscia put it: “The important thing now is that we need public confidence because of all the big projects we are working on. We have to establish that we can’t be working in some dark closet where nobody knows what happens.”

    These changes should help open the doors and let the sunlight in. If they do not, the only recourse would seem to be to persuade both the New York and New Jersey legislatures to agree on the same reform language.

    That would be a heavy lift even for these two high-octane governors.

    Copyright 2007 The New York Times Company

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Transit Plan for Lower Manhattan
    By amigo32 in forum New York City Guide For New Yorkers
    Replies: 51
    Last Post: March 21st, 2008, 01:24 PM
  2. Uncertain Future of Brooklyn Port
    By Kris in forum New York City Guide For New Yorkers
    Replies: 31
    Last Post: January 16th, 2005, 02:23 PM
  3. Downtown Brooklyn, the Plan
    By Kris in forum New York City Guide For New Yorkers
    Replies: 31
    Last Post: July 3rd, 2004, 09:01 PM
  4. Financing Plan Adds Complexity to Remaking of West Side
    By Fabb in forum New York Real Estate
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: March 11th, 2003, 05:55 AM
  5. Officials Plan New WTC '93 Memorial
    By amigo32 in forum New York City Guide For New Yorkers
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: February 27th, 2003, 04:51 AM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  


Google+ - Facebook - Twitter - Meetup

Edward's photos on Flickr - Wired New York on Flickr - In Queens - In Red Hook - Bryant Park - SQL Backup Software