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Thread: 200 Greenwich Street - Proposed WTC Tower #2 - by Norman Foster

  1. #1

    Default 200 Greenwich Street - Proposed WTC Tower #2 - by Norman Foster

    British Architect Chosen To Design Second Office Tower At WTC Site

    POSTED: 1:27 pm EST December 15, 2005
    NY Newsday

    NEW YORK -- British architect Lord Norman Foster has been chosen to build an office tower at the World Trade Center site, rebuilding officials announced Thursday.

    Foster, whose projects include the new Hearst tower in Manhattan, the Beijing airport and the Swiss Re headquarters in London, will build the second of developer Larry Silverstein's five planned office towers at ground zero.

    Foster joins a half-dozen architects, including Frank Gehry and Santiago Calatrava, hired since the Sept. 11, 2001 attacks to design different projects at the 16-acre trade center site. A transit hub designed by Calatrava is under construction now.

    Construction is scheduled to begin this spring on architect David Childs' Freedom Tower skyscraper. Groundbreaking is also scheduled in spring for a trade center memorial, and Gehry has submitted designs for a performing arts center.

    Silverstein hired Foster to build a 2.4-million square-foot tower with ground-level retail space and an underground concourse connecting workers to the new transit hub. Construction on the building is scheduled to begin in 2007. It is scheduled to open in 2011, two years after the Freedom Tower.

    The announcement comes as some officials aim to redefine a role at the site for Silverstein, who leased the trade center towers six weeks before they collapsed. Gov. George E. Pataki on Wednesday committed $1.67 billion in tax-exempt bonds to help Silverstein build the two towers on schedule, but gave the developer three months to resolve issues with the site's owner that could involve returning control of other parts of the site.

    Silverstein has already rebuilt a 52-story tower overlooking ground zero to replace Seven World Trade Center, a third building that had collapsed on Sept. 11. Until Thursday, he had no signed tenants for either Seven or for the Freedom Tower. But the New York Academy of Science signed a 15-year lease to rent the 40th floor of Seven World Trade, Silverstein said. The space will include a 300-person conference center, and Silverstein said more leases would soon follow.

    "I just fervently hope that that building begins to fill up," said John Whitehead, chairman of the Lower Manhattan Development Corp.

  2. #2
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    Default Foster

    Cool.

  3. #3

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    Silverstein's press release.

    ...What is this 200 Greenwich nonsense? ...Some good facts in here, though.

    **
    http://www.prnewswire.com/cgi-bin/st...4234923&EDATE=


    Pritzker Prize-Winning Architect Lord Norman Foster Commissioned to Design Third Tower to be Rebuilt at World Trade Center

    Governor Pataki and WTC Developer Larry A. Silverstein Introduce
    Lord Foster during Ceremony at Nearly Completed 7 World Trade Center

    Sixty-Five Story Retail and Office Tower to Rise at 200 Greenwich Street

    NEW YORK, Dec. 15 /PRNewswire/ -- Governor George E. Pataki joined WTC Developer Larry A. Silverstein at 7 World Trade Center today to introduce Lord Norman Foster as the architect commissioned to design the third World Trade Center tower to be constructed by the Silverstein organization since 9/11.

    In addition to announcing Lord Foster, Governor Pataki and Mr. Silverstein unveiled the timetable for the design and construction of the sixty-five story tower, which will have a 200 Greenwich Street address.

    The 200 Greenwich Street building will be bounded by Vesey Street to the North, Fulton Street to the South, Church Street to the East, and a re-introduced Greenwich Street to the West. It will include 2.4 million square feet of office space and approximately 130,000 square feet of retail both at street level and as part of an underground concourse linking to the PATH transportation hub.

    Governor Pataki said, "The World Trade Center had a long history as an international center of commerce and after 9/11 there was a global outpouring of support and solidarity. It is only fitting that one of the international community's most esteemed architects should be chosen to join an already illustrious and international group of men and women working to rebuild and revitalize Lower Manhattan. The selection of Lord Norman Foster to design Tower Two is just the latest signal that the rebuilding of the World Trade Center site is moving forward in achieving its destiny as a world-class central business district. We look forward to seeing his vision for the tower and to commencing construction on the remaining signature projects -- the Freedom Tower and 'Reflecting Absence,' the memorial to our nearly 3,000 lost heroes this spring."

    Added Mr. Silverstein, "When I committed the rest of my working life to the World Trade Center, I vowed to build to the very highest architectural, environmental and life safety standards. As he has proven time and again -- from Hong Kong to London to New York City -- Norman Foster understands how to design a bold urban icon while simultaneously enhancing the environment and quality of life of the building's occupants. There is no doubt that he will add yet another remarkable jewel in downtown's skyline."

    Lord Foster, the founder and chairman of Foster and Partners, is widely regarded as one of the world's pre-eminent architects. Founded in London in 1967, the company has a worldwide practice, with project offices in more than 20 countries. Over the past four decades the company has been responsible for a strikingly wide range of work, from urban master plans, public infrastructure, airports, civic and cultural buildings, offices and workplaces to private houses and product design.

    His current and recent work includes the largest construction project in the world, Beijing Airport. He has also designed the New German Parliament in the Reichstag in Berlin, the Millau Viaduct in France, the Swiss Re tower and the Great Court at the British Museum in London, the Hearst Headquarters tower in New York, Boston Museum of Fine Arts, Research Centers for Stanford University, California, the redevelopment of Dresden Railway Station and a new high speed rail link in Florence.

    Both the Hearst Tower and 7 World Trade Center, which was designed by David Childs of Skidmore, Owings & Merrill, are scheduled for completion in 2006 and both are expected to be certified as New York City's first "green" skyscrapers by the U.S. Green Buildings Council. Lord Foster's 200 Greenwich Street tower, as well as Childs' Freedom Tower, also are expected to achieve official green status.

    According to Mr. Silverstein, another important factor in the selection of Lord Foster is his ability to skillfully and seamlessly blend large, street-level retail into his office projects.

    "It is an honor and a tremendous responsibility to play a role in hastening the rebirth of the World Trade Center," said Lord Foster. "When Foster and Partners participated in the LMDC's innovative design study in 2002, we viewed the renewal of the World Trade Center in part as the catalyst for the regeneration of all of downtown Manhattan. The 200 Greenwich Street tower in particular is critical as its street level retail and direct connections to the WTC transit hub will reinvigorate the area with a humanity and a vitality that has been noticeably absent these past four years." Mr. Silverstein also outlined the following timetable for construction of the building:

    * Design work, 2006-2007

    * Excavation/slurry wall/foundation, 2007-2008

    * Superstructure concrete up to ground level, 2008-2009

    * Structural steel erection, 2009-2010

    * Structural concrete tower core and slab, 2009-2010

    * Curtain walls, 2009-2011

    * Core and shell work, 2010-2011

    * Building opening, 2011

    Governor Pataki, Mr. Silverstein and Lord Foster were joined at the announcement by Sir Philip Thomas, the British Consul General in New York. Sir Philip said, "It is fitting that one of Great Britain's greatest architects participate in the World Trade Center project. Our countries have long shared a common bond, and our alliance has only grown stronger since September 11, 2001. I am confident that Lord Foster will produce a stunning design to the credit of both of our countries."



    SOURCE Silverstein Properties
    ***

  4. #4

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    Great!
    Can't say I am surprised by this decision, given Foster's extremely popular design for twin undulating towers during the design competition.

    Waiting with baited breath to see what he comes up with.

  5. #5
    Forum Veteran macreator's Avatar
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    Default

    Can't believe it won't be done until a decade after the World Trade Center was destroyed but I guess that's the consequence of the lack of coordination at Ground Zero these past 4 and a half years.

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by MrShakespeare
    "It is an honor and a tremendous responsibility to play a role in hastening the rebirth of the World Trade Center," said Lord Foster. "When Foster and Partners participated in the LMDC's innovative design study in 2002, we viewed the renewal of the World Trade Center in part as the catalyst for the regeneration of all of downtown Manhattan. The 200 Greenwich Street tower in particular is critical as its street level retail and direct connections to the WTC transit hub will reinvigorate the area with a humanity and a vitality that has been noticeably absent these past four years." Mr. Silverstein also outlined the following timetable for construction of the building:

    * Design work, 2006-2007

    * Excavation/slurry wall/foundation, 2007-2008

    * Superstructure concrete up to ground level, 2008-2009

    * Structural steel erection, 2009-2010

    * Structural concrete tower core and slab, 2009-2010

    * Curtain walls, 2009-2011

    * Core and shell work, 2010-2011

    * Building opening, 2011
    This is the one I've been waiting for, even if its a year or two later than expected. I'm sure I won't be disappointed...

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by macreator
    Can't believe it won't be done until a decade after the World Trade Center was destroyed but I guess that's the consequence of the lack of coordination at Ground Zero these past 4 and a half years.

    There's still the matter of getting tenants for these buildings...

  8. #8
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    Another tower by Foster in the press today ...

    Norman Foster to design EnCana's Calgary headquarters

    Bloomberg
    Dec. 15, 2005

    http://www.theglobeandmail.com/servl...iness/Canadian


    EnCana Corp., Canada's biggest natural gas producer, has hired British architect Norman Foster to design its new headquarters in downtown Calgary.

    London-based Foster and Partners was picked last week as the lead architect for the new headquarters, EnCana spokeswoman Almas Kassam said in a telephone interview yesterday.

    Construction is scheduled to start in 2007 and is likely to be completed by 2010.

    The proposed complex will be the largest office tower west of Toronto and Canada's highest since the 68-storey Scotia Plaza was built in Toronto 17 years ago. EnCana hasn't revealed the cost of the project. The estimated cost of the project is about $500-million (U.S.).

    Mr. Foster's projects include Swiss Reinsurance Co.'s 40-storey tower -- the "gherkin" -- in London's financial district, the new Wembley Stadium in London and Germany's federal Parliament building in Berlin.

    In Canada, Foster and Partners has designed the Jameson Tower in Vancouver and the Leslie L. Dan Pharmacy Building at the University of Toronto, according to his website.

  9. #9
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    Some of Foster's current towers under construction ...

    One Central Park

    Dubai, UAE 2005-2008

    Construction Date: 2005

    Completion Date: 2008

    http://www.fosterandpartners.com/int...asp?JobNo=1309



    The design for 'One Central Park' is located on a prominent corner site within the 'Dubai International Finance Centre'. The 80-storey 328m mixed-use tower, combining 520 luxury apartments with 25 floors of office space, and shops, restaurant, pool, and health club, will have the world's highest apartment.

    The eye-catching shape of One Central Park has been generated by a desire to clearly express the structural system and internal organisation of the tower. The upper-level block of apartments - offering the highest residential views in the world - are supported by four attenuated A-frame 'fins' at 27m centres, which are buttressed at each end elevation. 25 levels of column-free office accommodation are held within from these fins, separated from the residential levels by a glazed sky-lobby. The tower is orientated east - west to maximise views over the Finance Centre and to the coastline and desert. This orientation also reduces solar gain, with the building core mass absorbing heat to reduce mechanical ventilation loads. A system of sunshades shelters the interiors on the exposed south elevation.


    ******************************************


    Jameson Tower

    Vancouver, Canada 2004-2009

    Construction Date: 2004

    Completion Date: 2009

    http://www.fosterandpartners.com/int...asp?JobNo=1289



    Located in Vancouver’s heritage district, the mixed-use residential Jameson Tower is designed to engage with the built fabric of its historic surroundings, and exemplify sustainable living. This project continues Foster and Partners practice of designing contemporary interventions in historic structures that began with the New German Parliament at the Reichstag and the Great Court of the British Museum, and has recently been explored in a high-rise context with the Hearst Tower in New York.

    The Jameson Tower project involves restoring the A-listed 1929 Ceperley Rounsfell Building, retaining the facade of the B-listed Chamber of Mines, and adding a new tower with 10 storeys of retail, restaurant and commercial accommodation, and twenty-five storeys of residential accommodation with subterranean parking. The formal massing of the tower refers to its urban setting, in particular, the adjacent 33-storey Terminal City Club tower, and the street-level two-storey heritage buildings.


    *******************************************

    Repsol Headquarters

    Madrid, Spain 2002-2007

    Construction Date: 2004

    Completion Date: 2007

    http://www.fosterandpartners.com/int...asp?JobNo=1177#



    This new headquarters building for Repsol - the Spanish oil and gas company - continues investigations into the sustainable workplace that can be traced through a family of recent office towers, most notably for Swiss Re and Commerzbank. With this new headquarters, Repsol – for whom the practice also designed new service stations and roadside identity – will be able for the first time to consolidate its 3,600-strong team in one location in Madrid in a building that communicates the company’s core values.

    The thirty-four-storey building is located on the site of the former Real Madrid training grounds, where the city council has assigned sites for four new towers by international architects.


    ********************************************

    Regent Place

    Sydney, Australia 2003-2007

    Construction Date: 2003

    Completion Date: 2007

    http://www.fosterandpartners.com/int...asp?JobNo=1197#




    The design for a mixed-use development on George Street in the heart of Sydney will transform this key area into a lively urban quarter where people can live, work and enjoy life in the city. The site, opposite St Andrew's Cathedral and close to the Town Hall, has been vacant since 1989.

    The development consists of two towers floating above a 5-storey sandstone podium that contains retail, commercial and leisure spaces. Key design objectives have been to integrate the design of the development’s base at street level and to simultaneously establish a successful relationship to the existing historic buildings located around the site. The two towers become increasingly transparent as they rise into the sky and provide a point of reference for the Central Sydney skyline.

    The main 56-storey tower consists of a cluster of eight tall, slender smaller towers supported by a central core. This will provide high standard private residential apartments. The second 33 –storey tower houses serviced apartments and recreational spaces.

    ************************************************** ***


  10. #10

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    My favorite:

    Last edited by BPC; December 16th, 2005 at 01:26 AM.

  11. #11

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    Are we looking at another June unveiling?

    Quote Originally Posted by NorthJersey.com
    British architect Lord Norman Foster joins group rebuilding World Trade Center

    Friday, December 16, 2005
    By AMY WESTFELDT

    The new skyscraper will include more than 100,000 square feet of ground-level retail space and an underground concourse connecting workers to the new transit hub.

    Foster said he would present a design in the summer.

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    Silverstein Names Lord Foster, Star Architect, To Build Tower 2

    By DAVID LOMBINO, Staff Reporter of the Sun

    Developer Larry Silverstein yesterday looked to build momentum for his bid to redevelop ground zero. At a joint press conference with Governor Pataki, Mr. Silverstein named a star British architect, Lord Norman Foster, to design Tower 2, a 65-story office building to stand alongside the Freedom Tower. It is expected to be completed in 2011.

    Mr. Silverstein also announced the first lease signing at 7 World Trade Center, the commercial office building that is set to open this spring. The New York Academy of Sciences agreed to a 15-year lease for 40,000 square feet - the entire 40th floor - where it will house its headquarters and a conference center.

    Advocates of increased mixed-use development at ground zero, which would include housing, have pointed to a tepid response by potential commercial tenants to the $700 million 7 World Trade Center. Mr. Silverstein has yet to sign any major tenants, although several companies are said to have expressed interest, including China's Vantone Real Estate Company and Ameriprise Financial.

    Tower 2, located at 200 Greenwich St., will contain 2.4 million square feet of office space, just 200,000 square feet less than the Freedom Tower. It will also include about 130,000 square feet of retail space at ground level and in an underground concourse that will link to the PATH train transportation hub next door.

    The building will fill an entire block bound by Church Street to the east, Vesey Street to the north, the reconstituted Fulton Street to the south, and Greenwich Street to the west.

    Mr. Foster's recent projects include the Hearst Corporation's headquarters in Midtown, the Beijing Airport, the German Parliament at the Reichstag in Berlin, the courtyard of the British Museum in London, and the Boston Museum of Fine Arts. He received the prestigious Pritzker Architecture Prize in 1999.

    Mr. Foster will join a celebrated list of architects who have signed on to design some part of Daniel Libeskind's master site plan, including Frank Gehry, David Childs, and Santiago Calatrava. In the original contest to determine the designer of the ground zero centerpiece, Mr. Foster's touching twin towers lost out to Mr. Child's design for the Freedom Tower, which is scheduled to begin construction this spring.

    Yesterday's announcements closely followed Mr. Pataki's decision on Wednesday to break with the city and give the state's half of the remaining tax-exempt Liberty Bonds to Mr. Silverstein for the construction of the Freedom Tower and Tower 2. The city and state had been working together in their negotiations with Mr. Silverstein over the remaining $3.35 billion.

    Mr. Silverstein remains in negotiations with the city over its outstanding allotment of $1.67 billion in Liberty Bonds, with which he plans to finance two more commercial towers at ground zero. But the city has been arguing with the developer over several issues, including a construction timetable and the amount of the developer's fee.

    State officials have indicated that the Port Authority has engaged in preliminary discussions with Silverstein Properties over taking back some portions of ground zero, including other building sites. The Port Authority owns the site and leased it to Silverstein Properties for 99 years in July 2001. Mr. Pataki said Wednesday that the Port Authority and Mr. Silverstein have 90 days to conclude their negotiations.

    Yesterday, Mr. Pataki said in a statement, "The selection of Lord Norman Foster to design Tower Two is just the latest signal that the rebuilding of the World Trade Center site is moving forward in achieving its destiny as a world-class central business district."

    LOAD-DATE: December 16, 2005

  13. #13
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    Something round -- ala The Swiss Re Tower at St. Mary Axe in London (aka "the gherkin") -- would be great on this site:




    Of all the buildings to be built the 2WTC tower will stand alone in the way that others do not. A tricky design complication here is the relationship to the sites / structures which will abut 2WTC, many of which are low rise buildings less than 10 stories: St. Paul's chapel / cemetery directly to the east, the Calatrava transportation center directly to the south, the proposed Cultural Center diagonally across Greenwich St to the SW, the proposed Performing Arts Center directly to the west and the Post Office building directly to the north.



  14. #14

    Default 200 Greenwich Street (Foster WTC Tower)

    New York Times
    December 16, 2005

    British Architect Returns to Ground Zero

    By DAVID W. DUNLAP

    Three years after he presented a vision of ground zero with audaciously angled twin towers that touched at three points on their way to a 126-story summit, the British architect Norman Foster returned to Lower Manhattan yesterday to start work on a different World Trade Center skyscraper.

    The steel frame of the 65-story building, 200 Greenwich Street, is to begin rising from the northeast corner of the trade center site in 2009. It is to have 2.4 million square feet of offices and 130,000 square feet of stores. Completion is expected in 2011.

    Lord Foster, 70, the architect of the new Hearst Tower on Eighth Avenue, between 56th and 57th Streets, revealed nothing of what 200 Greenwich Street might look like.

    But he did refer to his earlier involvement with the trade center site. "I was here with my team on 9/11," Lord Foster said, "and so, one year afterwards, when the competition for this site was announced, we felt a sense of moral responsibility to compete and to - as far as we were able - contribute to the task of regenerating this site."

    Foster & Partners lost the master planning bid in 2003 to Studio Daniel Libeskind. Now he has been brought back by Larry A. Silverstein, the commercial leaseholder on the site and developer of the 52-story 7 World Trade Center, which is almost finished.

    Mr. Silverstein said that the first lease at 7 World Trade Center, for one floor, was signed yesterday morning by the New York Academy of Sciences. The academy will move out of its longtime headquarters at 2 East 63rd Street by September.

    After developing 7 World Trade Center, the Freedom Tower and 200 Greenwich Street, it remains to be seen how much else Mr. Silverstein will build at the site. That depends, in part, on whether he can obtain the full $3.35 billion in tax-exempt Liberty Bonds that he is seeking.

    On Wednesday, Gov. George E. Pataki tentatively approved $1.67 billion in Liberty Bond financing for the Freedom Tower and 200 Greenwich Street, conditioned on a settlement within 90 days of all the unresolved issues between Silverstein Properties and the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, which owns the site.

    Among the questions are what Mr. Silverstein will receive in development fees, who will pay for the infrastructure under the new trade center, how the retail space will be developed and what will happen to the three remaining development parcels.

    Asked yesterday whether another developer should be brought in, the governor said, "We have to be open to every option to see how we can move forward as best as possible."

    Despite recent friction between City Hall and Albany over downtown development, yesterday's meeting of the Lower Manhattan Development Corporation board - the first since Mr. Pataki and Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg filled their full allotment of eight directors each - went smoothly, with unanimous votes and amicable comments.

    The board authorized contributing a total of $175 million to the World Trade Center Memorial Foundation, for the design and construction of the memorial and memorial museum, and acquiring a property at 140 Liberty Street for $59 million from Milstein Properties, to expand the overall trade center site by one block to the south.

    As he opened the meeting, John C. Whitehead, the corporation chairman, discussed the signing of the 40,000-square-foot, 15-year lease by the New York Academy of Sciences on the 40th floor of 7 World Trade Center.

    "It sort of breaks the dam and gets the flow of tenants coming to that building," Mr. Whitehead said. "Nobody wanted to be first and only. Now that that first and only has taken place, I just fervently hope that that building begins to fill up."

    The academy was founded in Lower Manhattan 188 years ago as the Lyceum of Natural History. Its 63rd Street building, an Italian Renaissance structure, was once home to Norman B. Woolworth, who gave it to the academy in 1949.

    The building has been sold for $31.25 million to Len Blavatnik, said the academy president, Ellis Rubinstein.

    The academy's new space will include a conference center that can accommodate 300 people at once, Mr. Rubinstein said, or three small events simultaneously. He said he hoped to make the room available to the Lower Manhattan Development Corporation for community use.

    The academy has been looking for space for years. In July 2001, Rodney W. Nichols, then the president, said he wanted a building with gravitas. "We're not going to move into one floor of the World Trade Center," he said.

    Shown that remark yesterday, Mr. Rubinstein allowed his jaw to drop for a moment, then said, "What we've done is transform in almost every way from where we were then to where we are today."

    Copyright 2005 The New York Times Company

  15. #15

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    for a building with this much importance and size, i really hope foster makes this if not the best, one of the best buildings he has desighned

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