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Thread: AT&T's Parthenon

  1. #16
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    \/ \/ Proper Crown



    Silly Crown \/ \/


  2. #17
    Crabby airline hostess - stache's Avatar
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    Remember how big the Sony bldg. used to look?

  3. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by lofter1
    \/ \/ Proper Crown



    Silly Crown \/ \/

    You're comparing a neoclassical and a postmodern building. I think the results, with any buildings of the following style matchup, is obvious.

  4. #19
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    But both were built by / for AT&T ...

    The original is "present" in it's representation of the golden orb atop the pyramid, while the newer Johnson-designed crown (while supposedly from a Chippendale inspiration) is practically the negation of the first -- it is almost an invert of the original.

    If you were Superman you might be able to lift that newer AT&T / Sony building up, turn it over, fly it downtown and slide that crown right around that beautiful gold ball.

    Johnson's little joke on AT&T?

  5. #20

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    no, no, it's a broken pdeiment, it IS classical. unfortunatley the rest is not. The effect: like laying a pearl on a pile of dung. Pearl gets dirty. Dung still smells.

  6. #21

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    Another of Johnson's overgrown foetuses: an idea undeveloped but made to grow to fully completed size.

  7. #22
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    I worked for Lehrer McGovern Bovis (now Bovis Lend-lease) at the time they had the contract to remove the statue from the top of 195 Broadway for inclusion in the Johnson building lobby. That statue had been struck by lightning so many times the engineering to remove it became quite a feat. It was a major (rather long) project, but the lobby in the new building with THAT statue as the focal point (as opposed to one currently there ) was magnificent.

  8. #23
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    A tricky balancing act -- but a sweet fit ...

    ***
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Click image for larger version. 

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  9. #24

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    ^heh, nice one Lofter

    Truly an impressive building, got these today





    I managed to ninja my way inside the lobby, despite the security rent-a-coppers leaning against some columns




  10. #25
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    Fantastic lobby / exterior, eh?

    No dinky paper-thin stone slab facings there ...

  11. #26

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    Nice shots, and some interesting info regarding 195 B'dway

    http://www.nyc-architecture.com/LM/LM069.htm

    Did some construction work in there, a real classic beauty. Definately worth the Landmark designation. Too bad there wasn't a way to let people view without the threat. It's the world we now live in.

  12. #27
    The Dude Abides
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    New York Post Online Edition

    BEIJING VANTONE HOT FOR 195 BROADWAY

    September 13, 2006 -- IT looks like Larry Silverstein's spurned tenant for 7 World Trade Center, Beijing Vantone, is hot for another property that overlooks Ground Zero.

    Sources tell us the U.S. arm of the Chinese real estate company has fallen for the top three floors of 195 Broadway.

    David Levinson, a partner in building owner L&L Acquisitions, would only admit they were among a number of firms in negotiations. The asking rent for those floors is $45 a foot.

    We're sure the Chinese were swayed by the partially pre-built eye-popping 28th floor. The majority of the executive floor in the former AT&T headquarters was redone with curved space-age white walls and fixtures but includes numerous wood-paneled executive offices with decorative fireplaces as well as a private duplex apartment and a roof deck.

    Beijing Vantone's broker, Peter Riguardi of Jones Lang LaSalle did not return a call by press time.

    Kathryn Wylde, President of the New York City Partnership, confirmed the Chinese business development firm is "hot" for that space and actually has all 200,000 feet pre-leased to smaller businesses.

    In a July surprise, as we exclusively reported, Silverstein canceled the firm's lease for the top floors of 7 WTC when a $45 million letter of credit was not delivered in a timely fashion.

    Last Wednesday was a beautiful night for Skidmore Ownings & Merrill's 70th anniversary soiree on the Lever House rooftop.

    Building owner Aby Rosen of RFR Holdings said he has gotten a lot of requests for the space but is very selective.

    Don't expect to get married there as he said, "That's not my style."

    The special event did bring out a confluence of architects, engineers, developers and politicians. Among those we spotted were Dan Tishman, Ronnie Hackett, Steve Roth and his wife/producer Darryl, Daniel Rose, his wife Joanna and son Joe, Trinity Church's Carl Weisbrod, and his distant cousin, Hunter College's Jennifer Raab.

    Philip R. Pitruzzello, who worked in-house at Time Warner on the building of that Skidmore designed tower, has jumped to Columbia University where he's overseeing that huge expansion and Renzo Piano development.

    In the you-can't-win-them-all category, the elegant Sheldon Solow spouted venom at me for previously calling him a "sore loser" for suing over his failed GM Building bid.

    In a happier moment, WTC Memorial designer Michael Arad showed off his cellphone photo of Ariel Zohar, born Aug. 27.

    HPD Commish Shaun Donovan, Buildings Commish Patricia Lancaster, and the above mentioned Wylde were among many others congratulating Skidmore's David Childs, Marilyn Jordan Taylor and TJ Gottesdiener, et al.

    lois.weiss@nypost.com

    Copyright 2006 NYP Holdings, Inc.

  13. #28

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    Is Retail Right for 'Sacred' Lobby?


    A section of the lobby that is
    proposed to house one of three stores



    Computer simulation depicting the proposed
    addition of one of three escalators to the lobby.


    By Carl Glassman
    POSTED DEC.29, 2006

    David Levinson stood in the marble forest of soaring Doric columns, his eyes scanning the cavernous temple-like space that is the lobby of 195 Broadway.

    “Think about owning this,” he said, opening his arms as if to embrace the grandeur of it all. “It’s awesome. I don’t think there’s a building like it in the city.”

    As chairman of L&L Holding Co., Levinson, in fact, does own it—as well as the million square feet of office space above. This is the former home of AT&T, both its exterior and interior designated as city landmarks last year.

    This month, Levinson aims to convince the Landmarks Preservation Commission that his painstakingly conceived plan to put three stores in the lobby—up to 12,000 square feet of retail space—will not spoil its magnificence.

    “This is going to be done to the highest standard, otherwise we’re not doing it,” the owner said as he led a reporter on a tour of the space. “I’m not going to mess this up.” As yet, no retail tenants have been selected.


    If his plan is approved, the lobby of 195 Broadway, with its 30-foot ceilings and bronze-and-alabaster chandeliers, will open to the public for the first time in years. It would be among only four of 14 landmarked interiors Downtown that the public can enter. Levinson said that putting stores in the lobby allows him to secure it for public use.

    Visitors would traverse a corridor or “galleria” running between entrances at Dey and Fulton Streets, and opening onto each of the three stores. Off of Dey Street would be a separate, private entrance and lobby for the office tenants.

    In order to create the individual spaces and maintain nearly unobstructed views of the grand interior, the proposal calls for sheer glass partitions rising 30 feet and ingeniously held in place by thin bronze cables and small plates. It is a partition system that the plan’s architect, Michael Gabellini, calls “operating at the outer limits of plausibility.”

    An interior, 135-foot-long wall of glass, running the block-long length of lobby between Dey and Fulton Streets, will define the public corridor.


    “We’ve created some budgets that are astronomical—many millions of dollars,” said Levinson. The glass, he said, “is the most expensive piece.”

    Last month, Levinson and his team presented the plan to Community Board 1’s Landmarks Committee, where it won advisory approval. But the committee worried about how the openness of the space would be preserved, and about the visual effect of merchandise and signage.

    “Those are the things that impact on the beauty of this space,” said committee member Marc Donnenfeld, “and the space right now is a sacred one.”

    Another committee member, Eric Anderson, expressed “grave concerns” over the merchandising in the space. But he voted for the plan.





    “One of the great things about the scheme,” he said, “is you will be able to go into the space—even if there’s some stuff in there that isn’t as pristine as the original use.”

    The building is at the junction of the Fulton Street Transit Center and the new World Trade Center PATH terminal, due for completion in 2010. According to Levinson’s plans, the three stores on the ground floor would also open onto lower levels that will be traversed daily by hundreds of thousands of commuters and subway riders. Escalators and an elevator would be installed in the lobby.

    In its resolution, later passed by the full board, the CB1 committee said it “could not abide” that equipment on the Broadway side.

    “The more access I get to the lower level the less I have to do on the ground floor,” the owner responded later. “The real retailing activity can happen below.”

    Levinson, who bought 195 Broadway in 2004 for a reported $270 million, said that aside from his long-time passion for the former AT&T building, he wanted to be at the hub of Lower Manhattan’s “wonderful redevelopment.” That will take time, he said, and so too might the approval for adapting the lobby of 195 Broadway to retail. But he is in no hurry.

    “With all the positive things happening Downtown, it only gets better for me,” he said with a smile. “The fruit only ripens.”

  14. #29

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    ^ Sounds well thought out. This kind of inspired realism evidently has the power to win over NIMBYs. It should be more widespread.

  15. #30
    Build the Tower Verre antinimby's Avatar
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    Landmark lobbying

    Old AT&T bldg.'s new owner calls for change



    Owner of former AT&T
    headquarters at 195 Broadway,
    with its magnificent colonnaded
    lobby and 40-foot coffered
    ceilings, is presenting plans to
    Landmarks Preservation
    Commission to allow construction
    of three glass-enclosed retail
    stores and two escalators inside
    landmarked premises.


    By PAUL D. COLFORD
    DAILY NEWS STAFF WRITER

    The lobby of AT&T's former headquarters is one of the most magnificent spaces in the city, so unusual that it was granted landmark status six months ago.

    But now the panel that deemed it "one of the great monumental classical interiors" must decide whether the new owner can build three stores and escalators inside 195 Broadway.

    The Landmarks Preservation Commission will review plans for the templelike space - with its forest of marble columns - at a hearing tomorrow morning.

    Then there could be months of discussion before the commission grants or rejects the request by L&L Holdings Co. for permission to make the changes.

    L&L Chairman David Levinson, who bought the 29-story building in 2005 and won protective status for its exterior and interior in July, declined to comment. His spokesman said it was too soon to identify stores that might move in.

    Illustrations filed with the Landmarks Commission by L&L's architects, Gabellini Sheppard Associates, show the largest of the three shops would cover 4,360 square feet.

    Two new escalators near the 195 Broadway entrance and another off Fulton St. would link the lobby to the subway and a lower Dey St. concourse, which will connect the Metropolitan Transportation Authority's Fulton Transit Center and the World Trade Center PATH station. Glass panels would enclose the stores and outline a pedestrian galleria cutting across the building's lobby from Dey to Fulton Sts.

    The use of glass appears to reflect the owner's wish to preserve views of the lobby's coffered, 40-foot ceiling and its expanse of columns, marble flooring, alabaster chandeliers and polished bronze.

    But some preservationists are concerned the retail outlets would ruin an architectural gem.

    "You would still be dividing up a dignified space that relies on being large and whole," said architect Robert Kornfeld of the Historic Districts Council, which is opposed to the plan.

    "When you picture that space with counters and tables and cash registers, it's going to be like the interior of a department store, except with glass partitions all over the place."

    Downtown Community Board 1 recently offered qualified support for L&L's plans.

    In a 36-to-3 vote, the board recommended that "much of this program be approved" but expressed concern about how merchandise and signs would be displayed.

    Constructed between 1912 and 1922, the building was AT&T's headquarters until the telephone giant sold it to developer Peter Kalikow in 1983 and moved to 550 Madison Ave. Tenants now include Thomson Financial and Morgan Stanley.

    Originally published on January 7, 2007

    © 2007 Daily News, L.P.

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