Page 5 of 10 FirstFirst 123456789 ... LastLast
Results 61 to 75 of 137

Thread: Pier A

  1. #61

    Default

    And fix the clock.

    Six bells. Time for chowder & beer.

  2. #62
    The Dude Abides
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    NYC - Financial District
    Posts
    4,418

    Default

    Jeez, sorry I mentioned it.

  3. #63

    Default

    I think pier A would be perfect for the Ellis Island/Liberty Island ferries. A waiting area with a video presentation about the history of the harbor, ellis island, and the statue would be nice to provide a diversion while waiting in line. A gift shop, lower Manhattan visitors center, and nice water-side cafe and your done. A great way for first-time Lower Manhattan visitors to get started. I have guided many bus groups to do the Harbor thing and this would be better. I always thought that the current set-up cheats Castle Clinton its due...a lot of people thinks that its part of the ferry waiting area and nothing more...

  4. #64

    Default



    Authority looks for Pier A partition plan

    By Julie Shapiro

    The historic walls that carve up Pier A’s second floor are the latest challenge the Battery Park City Authority faces in redeveloping the 122-year-old pier.

    The authority is about to sign a 49-year, rent-free lease with the city to repair and restore the pier, bringing retail, restaurants and possibly ferries to the dilapidated and fenced-off site.

    But since the green-trimmed pier building is a state-registered historic site, it falls under the purview of the State Historic Preservation Office, meaning that SHiPO gets to decide which pieces of the structure must be preserved.

    The Battery Park City Authority has met with SHiPO twice, and the preservation agency is concerned that the interior of the building be preserved, Alexandra Altman, executive vice president and chief counsel for the authority, said at the authority’s board meeting last week.

    But Dan Keefe, a spokesperson for SHiPO, said the state has not done any detailed studies and has not yet reviewed the project.

    At issue is a 200-foot corridor that cuts a line down the length of Pier A’s second floor. Small offices open off either side of the corridor. The offices once housed the Department of Docks, according to the state’s 1975 application to include Pier A on the National Register of Historic Places. At its west end, the corridor terminates in what was once a meeting room, and on the east it opens into a large fireproof room that stored valuable records and maps.

    The Department of Marine and Aviation and the Department of Ports and Terminals later used the offices until 1959. In 1960, the pier became a fireboat station.

    SHiPO could require the authority to maintain the partitions on the second floor, preventing the authority from opening it up into a single large space. Many ideas for the pier over the years included a banquet hall.

    Jim Cavanaugh, president of the authority, said maintaining the partitions “may be an impediment to certain types of uses.”

    SHiPO’s Keefe did not identify anything that was historically significant about the office partitions.

    Hugh Hardy, founder of H3 Hardy Collaboration Architecture, the firm designing Pier A, is aware of the potential limitations on the space, Cavanaugh said. Hardy will likely retain some element of the partitions, enough to give a sense of what they were, but he will open the space up for a new use, Cavanaugh said.

    At the authority’s board meeting last week, members also discussed the city’s funding cap for the project.

    “The city made clear that they want this funded for $30 million and not a penny more,” Cavanaugh told the board.

    Charles Urstadt, vice chairperson of the authority’s board, said cost escalations are inevitable, especially on the underwater work.

    “You never know what you’re going to run into,” he said.

    Stephanie Gelb, vice president of planning and design, said the authority could complete the first phase of work with the $30 million and then leave the finishing touches to future developers. Cavanaugh later said the authority might turn part of the building’s shell over to a future tenant and have the tenant provide the fit-out.

    The authority has an extra $1.2 million for the project in a grant from the state Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation to repair the pier and create a visitors center. The grant was initially $4 million, and the authority has spent some of that money on restoring the pier’s substructure, Cavanaugh said.

    The authority also could get around $7.5 million in historic preservation tax credits, a federal program. But Cavanaugh said that is far from definite.

    The authority is negotiating with the National Park Service to move the ferries to Ellis Island and the Statue of Liberty to the pier. If the ferries do move, the National Park Service “wants some level of comfort, if not control, over the other tenants,” Cavanaugh said. As the authority discusses tenants and design, repairs to the pier’s substructure are underway.

    The state’s 1975 description of Pier A makes the case for preserving the pier, a description that applies just as much to today’s Lower Manhattan landscape: “[Pier A is] one of the very few vestiges of Lower Manhattan’s historic seaward orientation,” the application says. “The distinct vitality of the pier’s design as well as its human scale, now rare in the high-rise world of New York City, enable it to make a unique contribution to the ambience of the island’s southern tip.”

    Julie@DowntownExpress.com

  5. #65

    Default

    I find it an encouraging sign that these problems are being discussed. For the 14 years I've been living down here, there have been official assurances that "progress" was being made on Pier A, but never any details (or construction workers!). I am not a big fan of the BPCA, but they generally know how to get a construction project done.

  6. #66

    Default Update on Pier A?

    I am a RE student interested in cultural center development and Pier A is an amazing building and there are great ideas out there to restore it. However, are there any updates on what the situation is with the project?
    I ran by it today and there is so much opportunity and would love to do some research on what is going on with it.
    Can anyone provide any feedback/knowledge?

    Thanks!

  7. #67
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    NYC - Downtown
    Posts
    32,654

    Default

    Pretty much all the latest news can be found in this thread.

  8. #68
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    7,478

    Default

    Again, a Question of What to Do With Pier A

    By PATRICK MCGEEHAN


    A rendering of Pier A, at the northern edge of Battery Park, as it might look when developed,
    from the Economic Development Corporation.


    Having lost the National Park Service as a prospective tenant, the city is now seeking ideas on what to do with Pier A, a dilapidated 123-year-old structure at the northern edge of Battery Park.

    The crumbling Victorian pier, which once was home to the fire department’s marine operations, has been an albatross to city officials for decades. More than 10 years ago, when Rudolph W. Giuliani was mayor, the city gave a 49-year lease to a developer who was supposed to restore it.

    That plan stalled and the city wound up paying about $8 million to end the lease in 2007. Back then, the National Park Service was still considering making Pier A the base of operations for its ferry service to the Statue of Liberty and Ellis Island, and city officials hoped to turn the pier into Manhattan’s hub for water-borne tourism and transportation.
    But the park service decided this year not to wait for Pier A to be rebuilt and began planning to move the ferry-loading operation to the Battery Maritime building at the other end of Battery Park.

    This week, the city’s Economic Development Corporation began soliciting suggestions about how to fill the pier when it is ready to be occupied. The uses could include restaurants, stores, markets, tourist services and office space. The development corporation expects the work to be completed in March 2011.

    The city has allocated $30 million for the rehabilitation project, which is being overseen by the Battery Park City Authority, a city-state corporation. About $5 million has already been spent shoring up the base of the pier, according to the development corporation.

    http://cityroom.blogs.nytimes.com/20...o-with-pier-a/

  9. #69
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    7,478

    Default

    Informational meeting last week about Pier A redevelopment

    Initial meeting draws more than 50 attendees




    On Friday, more than 50 people representing business, transportation, arts and cultural enterprises attended an informational meeting on the redevelopment of Pier A, the historic Hudson River pier just south of Battery Park City. The meeting was organized by the Battery Park City Authority (BPCA), which has issued a Request for Qualifications (RFQ) from those interested in leasing and operating Pier A for "an active use that will create a first-class destination in Lower Manhattan." New York City Economic Development Corporation is working closely with the BPCA on the $30 million restoration of the City-owned pier.

    Pier A, which dates from 1886 and is the last of the piers that once lined the Hudson River in Lower Manhattan, is three stories high with 39,000 square feet of interior space. Uses for Pier A that have been put forward to date include cultural and art exhibit space, a restaurant, a bakery and ferry operations. However, many of the attendees at Friday's meeting were just learning about the physical space of the pier so other uses may be suggested. Those expressing interest ranged from experienced entrepreneurs and cultural operators to people who are just breaking in to new fields. The RFQ process will identify applicants with sufficient experience and resources to develop the pier.

    There will be a second information session on Jan. 7, 2010, at 10 a.m. in the 24th floor conference room of the World Financial Center.

    Pier A was part of the Battery Park City footprint when the Authority was created in 1969. In addition to serving as a gateway for visitors to New York City, it was where soldiers returning from World War I disembarked and were welcomed home. The pier was also home to the Fire Battalion as well as to other port offices. It has been unoccupied for several decades.

    The Battery Park City Authority has already completed underwater repairs to the pier's foundation and has started to replace the pier's deck. Architect Hugh Hardy is responsible for the plans for the pier's restoration, which is expected to be completed with the building available to a selected tenant by March 31, 2011.

    The Battery Park City Authority will use the RFQ responses to gauge interest in and assess the qualifications of potential tenants for Pier A. Responses may be used to identify one or more preferred candidate(s) and/or to fashion a subsequent Request for Proposals to be issued in 2010.

    http://campaign.constantcontact.com/...lbNvZfy6QGg%3D


  10. #70
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    7,478

    Default

    Pier A renovation work approved

    by Julie Shapiro

    The Battery Park City Authority approved $11.1 million in construction contracts for Pier A Wednesday morning, paving the way for the final repairs to the historic pier.

    The authority is redeveloping the three-story landmark pier using $30 million from the city and hopes to turn it over to a tenant next year. The authority is slated to finish underwater repairs to the pier this April and then plans to start the core and shell work. The contracts approved Wednesday will cover that core and shell work. So far, the contracts have come in under budget, which left the authority with extra money to design the public plaza around the pier, the authority said Wednesday.

    Charles Urstadt, vice president of the B.P.C.A. board, raised the concern that the authority would lose money on Pier A, but the authority’s president, Jim Cavanaugh, said the city was bearing the risk of the project.

    The city has directed the authority not to spend any money beyond the initial $30 million, and the city is the one responsible for the debt service on those funds, Cavanaugh said.

    The authority is currently seeking tenants to occupy Pier A, including possibly a restaurant or catering hall at the western tip of Battery Park, but the city will have to approve the rent and terms of any deal.

    Robert Mueller, a board member, said he was worried that the authority would not be able to find a tenant willing to pay as much as the city would want.

    “I’m not trying to throw cold water on this, no pun intended,” Mueller said. While Mueller said he’d “love to see it work,” he added, “This project has failed before — it doesn’t exactly have a terrific history.”

    The city previously tried to work with a private developer on Pier A, which use to be a marine firehouse, but the project never got off the ground.
    Board member Lynn Rollins mentioned that her daughter in Oregon recently told her of a vegan restaurant there that supports itself by running a porn shop in the back. The other board members laughed heartily.
    “So moved!” Urstadt joked.

    “What are you moving?” Chairperson James Gill asked. “The porn shop?”
    Prospective tenants have until Feb. 16 to submit their proposals to the authority for consideration.

    http://www.downtownexpress.com/de_35...enovation.html

  11. #71
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    7,478

    Default

    Checking Out the Creepiness of Battery Park's Pier A

    February 9, 2010, by Sara




    (click to enlarge)

    As the architects prepare to plead with the Landmarks Preservation Commission for approval to finish exterior renovation work at Pier A, the Tribeca Citizen took a look around the building's first and second floors. We nabbed the photos for the gallery above, to give us something to look at until the LPC makes its decision a week from today.

    Inside Pier A: The First Floor [Tribeca Citizen]
    Pier A coverage [Curbed]

    http://curbed.com/archives/2010/02/0...rks_pier_a.php

  12. #72

    Default

    ON Jan 27, BPCA approved $11.1 million in contracts to continue pier rehabilitation. Interior demo is complete. Decking will be complete in April. Core and shell work will start later this year. The bids were under budget, so the extra money will be used for the plaza in front of the pier.

    A tenant is needed to defray the cost of debt service on $30 million, as well as maintenance.

  13. #73
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    7,478

    Default

    With landmarks approval, Pier A now in search of tenants

    Rendering of the approved new look for Pier A by H3 Hardy Collaboration Architecture, top.
    A look at the pier now and from inside the ground floor, right.


    By Julie Shapiro

    The redevelopment of Pier A cleared one hurdle this week when the project won unanimous approval from city Landmarks Preservation Commission.
    L.P.C.’s vote will allow the Battery Park City Authority to finish stabilizing and restoring the historic pier building so it can eventually open to the public.

    “This is a wonderful project,” said Frederick Bland, a Landmarks commissioner, before Tuesday’s vote. “It’s been stalled for so long.”

    Hoping to inject new energy into the long-delayed restoration of the 124-year-old building jutting out of Manhattan’s southwestern tip, the city leased Pier A to the B.P.C. Authority two years ago and gave the authority $30 million to get Pier A ready for a commercial tenant.

    The authority solicited plans for the pier last fall and many groups attended information sessions, including restaurants, catering halls, arts nonprofits and educational institutions. Proposals were due back to the authority at the end of the day on Tuesday, and on Wednesday, the authority said it had received seven proposals from “very reputable teams.” Authority staff had raised questions in the past about whether development at the pier could be profitable, since it is tucked in a corner of Battery Park that gets little traffic in the winter.

    When the authority took over Pier A, the building had been vacant for about 20 years. Surf splashed up through cracks in the floor and rain poured in through poorly sealed windows. The pier’s underwater supports were crumbling, and the entire three-story building leaned several degrees to the south.

    “It truly is a miracle that the building is still standing,” said Jack Martin, an architect with H3 Hardy Collaboration Architecture.

    H3 Hardy is now working for the B.P.C. Authority to complete restorations that Wings Point, a previous developer, started in the 1990s and abandoned partway through. Most of that work had already been approved by the L.P.C., but H3 made a few changes that the commissioners needed to review on Tuesday.

    The only controversial change was the color scheme for the building. The commissioners approved of H3’s plan to keep the roof a pale green, similar to copper’s patina, but they disliked the plan to paint the building dark beige with light cream trim. For most of Pier A’s history, the shades were reversed: the building had a lighter base with darker trim. Bland and other commissioners said the lighter trim gave the building an inappropriate colonial look, when it should appear more Victorian.

    Hugh Hardy, founder of H3, replied that he could switch the trim and base colors of the building. The architects returned to the L.P.C. several hours later with new renderings showing a lighter base and a darker trim, and based on that, the L.P.C. approved the project.

    Several members of Community Board 1’s Landmarks Committee had also objected to the color scheme when H3 architects presented the project last week. Bruce Ehrmann, co-chairperson of the committee, said the colors reminded him of a “historic theme park.” The committee gave an advisory vote in favor of the project, though Ehrmann and another board member voted against it.

    With landmarks approval in hand, the Battery Park City Authority hopes to finish restoring the pier by spring 2011, when it will be ready to turn over to a tenant. If the authority’s public-private development plan succeeds, Pier A could open to the public for the first time in its history.

    Originally conceived as an outpost for the New York Harbor Police and the Dept. of Docks, Pier A opened in 1886 as a mixture of offices and spaces for boats to tie up and unload. The “A” in Pier A stands for “administrative,” and as time passed the building slowly converted entirely to office space for government entities that managed the waterfront, said Jason Van Nest, an architect with H3.

    Each generation brought additions and alterations to the pier, some more historically sensitive than others. When the Fire Dept. took over in 1964, they stripped the building of all its metal cladding and used the interior as a pipe and woodworking shop, destroying much of the original fabric, Van Nest said. The F.D.N.Y. also used the pier as a fireboat station.

    One of the most visible historic features of Pier A is the clock tower on the far end, built as the nation and the city’s first World War I memorial in 1919. Van Nest said the clock’s face is in good shape, with the hands still attached, but he isn’t sure whether the clock can be made to work again.

    While the city’s $30 million investment in Pier A will do a lot to restore the building, Van Nest said the best way to ensure that the pier never again falls into disrepair is to find long-term tenants.

    “If we’re going to protect this building, it needs to be occupied,” he said.
    Nadezhda Williams, with the Historic Districts Council, also said she was concerned about the future of the pier, even once it is restored.

    “With its setting on the harbor, Pier A is both a very prominent landmark and unfortunately one very exposed to the forces of nature,” Williams said in testimony to the L.P.C. on Tuesday. “We urge the powers-that-be to make every effort to ensure Pier A’s stability, so that it does not fall apart or have to be dismantled…. The only thing more disheartening than seeing an unprotected historic building destroyed is watching a designated landmark crumble.”

    http://www.downtownexpress.com/de_35...kapproval.html

  14. #74

    Default

    I think that whole area north of Battery Park along Battery Place needs to be redone. Way too much paved open area and there's not enough vehicular traffic to justify it.


    Maybe it's the Battery tunnel underneath that causes it or maybe it's the bleakness of winter that's getting to me. I think Battery Park is a bit shabby too.

  15. #75
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    NYC - Downtown
    Posts
    32,654

    Default

    Battery Park, now that the 1 Subway line platform extension underneath had been completed, is slated for a re-do.

    Battery Park Conservancy

    Over the past 13 years, the Conservancy with its public partners, led by NYC Parks & Recreation, has secured $112 million for design, construction and maintenance endowment. Three major capital projects are complete and seven more are in various stages of development, with expected finish dates over the next five years. By 2014 the entire Master Plan for the 25 acres of the Battery will be realized.

    Projects in Planning

    The Battery Garden Bikeway: 2010

    The Town Green: 2010

    The Battery Lawn: 2011

    The Castle: 2014

    The Battery Conservancy has taken the first steps toward realizing the rebuilding of Castle Clinton. Thomas Phifer & Partners and Beyer Blinder Belle won the international competition in 1999 and have completed the conceptual design to take the Castle into the 21st century.

    The Thomas Phifer & Partners plan

Page 5 of 10 FirstFirst 123456789 ... LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Pier 40 - Hudson River Park
    By Edward in forum New York City Guide For New Yorkers
    Replies: 469
    Last Post: April 2nd, 2015, 05:15 AM
  2. Pier 57 - Hudson River Park
    By Edward in forum New York City Guide For New Yorkers
    Replies: 96
    Last Post: December 17th, 2013, 05:00 PM
  3. Pier 64 - Hudson River Park
    By Edward in forum New York City Guide For New Yorkers
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: June 23rd, 2013, 09:07 PM
  4. Pier 45 - Hudson River Park
    By Edward in forum New York City Guide For New Yorkers
    Replies: 28
    Last Post: July 10th, 2012, 11:58 PM
  5. West Midtown Ferry Terminal on Pier 79
    By Edward in forum New York City Guide For Visitors
    Replies: 27
    Last Post: November 12th, 2005, 02:23 AM

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  


Google+ - Facebook - Twitter - Meetup

Edward's photos on Flickr - Wired New York on Flickr - In Queens - In Red Hook - Bryant Park - SQL Backup Software