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Thread: 200 West 72nd Street - (a.k.a. 2075 Broadway) - UWS - Condo - by Handel Architects

  1. #61

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    MrSpice: I bet you´re new to NYC.

    You write:

    "I think that if the buildings don't have any historic or cultural value and are not recognized by respected institutions as such, developers should and can do whatever they want with those buildings."

    Buildings are often not recognized by "respected institutions" as being important until people lobby for their salvation. Furthermore, Manhattan has Historic Districts that contain plenty of buildings that are not individually important but are still protected. See the west Village.... or better take a walk up Madison avenue on the upper East Side.

    "That's the nature and the greateness of free market."

    Too bad but plenty of areas of Manhattan (interesting enough.... the most beautiful) do NOT operate completely under a "free market". You cannot build what ever you want, however you want.

    Got it? It´s not wishful thinking on my part. That is the way it is.

    "There are planty of older buildins in Soho and West Village that are in excellent shape and they are often beautifully maintained."

    Do you know ANYTHING of what the status of those charming buildings were back in the 1930´s through 1960´s? Back when many were tumble-down dumps?

    "I just think it's silly to be outrages when the old and poorly maintained buildins are sold and replaced by new developments"

    Then you´ll hate NYC.

    "...it's a nature of progress".

    "the market will and should dictacte what's built and where."

    No it won´t. You are in NYC ..... not the "Far West" of the ex-Soviet Union.

    ---------------------------

    "I look at it this way - if I own a house and decide to make it look really ugly - it's my right."

    No it´s not. You really should think about moving to Albania or some other savage ex-communist anarchy-style nation.
    Last edited by Fabrizio; April 7th, 2006 at 12:40 PM.

  2. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fabrizio
    Got it? Itīs not wishful thinking on my part. That is the way it is.

    "the market will and should dictacte what's built and where."

    No it wonīt. You are in NYC ..... not the "Far West" of the ex-Soviet Union.
    As far as I understand, that 72nd Street redevelopment is well under way, which means that it went through all the necessary hearings and has a building permit. I am glad it's moving forward. I may be new to NYC (only 11 years here), but I know this 72nd street block extremely well - I passed by that corner hundreds of times and I am glad they are replacing this building.

    I think a smart policy regarding those kinds of buildings would be pushing the developer to choose a better/more attractive design rather than preserving the buildings that are no longer viable.

  3. #63

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    "but I know this 72nd street block extremely well - I passed by that corner hundreds of times..."

    The world is filled with people who pass by buildings/churches/statues/paintings/murals.... and have no idea of what theyīre looking at....or donīt look at all. You do not understand (or donīt want to understand) that many of the beautiful and elegant places in NYC are that way today because of people who fought great battles against those who DID NOT SEE the beauty.

  4. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fabrizio
    "but I know this 72nd street block extremely well - I passed by that corner hundreds of times..."

    The world is filled with people who pass by buildings/churches/statues/paintings/murals.... and have no idea of what theyīre looking at....or donīt look at all. You do not understand (or donīt want to understand) that many of the beautiful and elegant places in NYC are that way today because of people who fought great battles against those who DID NOT SEE the beauty.
    Fine - I don't live in that community (would love to, but cannot afford to buy an apartment on 72nd street) and those who live there had many legal channels to fight to preserve this building if it's indeed so valuable to that community. My guess was, that they did not think it was that valuable. And I would argue that people that don't live in a neighborhood have a more objective view about the value of this building. I am sure it could have been improved and restored if it was financially feasable and necessary.

  5. #65

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    BTW: MrSpice: i think you should take a walk up Madison Avenue in the 60īs and 70īs.... you have one of the most luxurious high rent areas of the entire world... with internationaly famous designer boutiques.... but notice how many tenements and old non descript buildings there are. Notice how many tenements have had their ground floors rip-out and changed. None of these buildings are individual landmarks... individually some of them are even kind of sad..... but they play together and form a chic, intimate low rise streetscape that is one of the nicest, most beautiful shopping streets in the world. Itīs charming. There is a patina of age. For many people....pehaps hard for you to see and appreciate... it is what they consider true elegance.

    If anything this building at 72nd reminds me of something that would look at home on Madison with beautiful shops at the base.

  6. #66
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fabrizio
    BTW: MrSpice: i think you should take a walk up Madison Avenue in the 60īs and 70īs.... you have one of the most luxurious high rent areas of the entire world... with internationaly famous designer boutiques.... but notice how many tenements and old non descript buildings there are. Notice how many tenements have had their ground floors rip-out and changed.
    That's because those upscale boutiques go well with the old, low-rise buildings and because of crazy profit margins and outrageous rents, those low-rise buildings pay for themselves. The 72nd street around Broadway is not as intimate. There are lots of high rises and more modern buildings in the are (one - across the street) as well as ugly old building on 72nd street itself. So, having another modern building would not be out of character on this corner.

  7. #67
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    Interesting that you should raise this point:
    Quote Originally Posted by MrSpice
    I don't know where you're coming up with the conclusion that this is in the landlord's interest not to maintain their buildings in good shape.
    Banks Press Landlords on Repairs

    By JANNY SCOTT
    NY Times
    April 7, 2006

    A coalition of housing advocacy groups and two large banks that hold mortgages on hundreds of apartment buildings in New York City announced an unusual agreement yesterday under which they will use the banks' leverage as lenders to pressure landlords into repairing dilapidated buildings.

    The agreement between the coalition, Housing Here and Now, and the banks, Citigroup and New York Community Bank, represents a new weapon against landlords reluctant to make repairs. Housing advocates hope to use this tool not simply to fix leaks and crumbling plaster, but also to shore up low-income neighborhoods and make them less vulnerable to gentrification.

    The loan portfolios of New York Community Bank and Citigroup together include more than 900 buildings and 66,000 units, according to Housing Here and Now. New York Community Bank, which holds the loans on a majority of those buildings, describes itself as the largest producer of multifamily loans in New York City and operates a network of branches including Queens County Savings Bank and Roslyn Savings Bank.

    Under the agreement, a bank that receives an application for a mortgage on an apartment building must first evaluate the owner's and the building's track record. Using the records of the city's Department of Housing Preservation and Development and those of Housing Here and Now, the bank will consider past housing code violations, emergency repair liens and litigation.

    The bank would then require that run-down conditions and violations be fixed before closing on the sale. New York Community Bank agreed to hold repair money in escrow for release when repairs are done. The banks are also to inspect buildings annually; those considered severely distressed are to be given a repair plan and timetable for completion.

    While in theory a bank has the power to foreclose on a building whose owner has repeatedly failed to make repairs, bank officials said such a step is unusual. Under the new agreement, banks are more likely to use the threat of withholding a loan, rather than the threat of foreclosure, to pressure landlords into properly maintaining their properties.

    Representatives of about 18 other banks doing business in the city met on Wednesday with Citigroup and New York Community Bank officials, as well as city and state housing and banking officials, to discuss the agreement.

    Diana L. Taylor, the state superintendent of banks, has written to banks throughout New York encouraging them to adopt similar practices voluntarily.

    "This is a big deal," Alan G. Hevesi, the New York State comptroller, said at a news conference yesterday organized by Housing Here and Now to announce the agreement. "This is serious and historic. It's an agreement that brings the banks in as partners in maximizing the potential for landlords to clean up buildings."

    Mr. Hevesi added, "This is serious mostly for tens of thousands of tenants in the city who have not been able to get landlords to respond to the problems that they live with every single day."

    In a hot real estate market like New York's, with the price of land rising, housing advocates say some landlords feel little pressure to maintain their buildings.

    If tenants leave, the owner is free to sell. "If you're a landlord, you don't need to preserve your collateral," said Jonathan Rosen, a spokesman for Housing Here and Now. "You just flip it on the land prices alone."

    The agreement is the product of a campaign that began last summer, when Housing Here and Now released a list of what it described as the city's 10 worst landlords. When some of the owners continued to fail to make repairs, even after the city had cracked down, the coalition turned its attention to the banks that had financed the purchase of the buildings.

    In January, the group reported that its own analysis of city housing code violations turned up problems in more than 600 multifamily buildings on which New York Community Bank held the mortgage. The group vowed to block the bank's planned acquisition of another bank, Atlantic Bank of New York, which was under federal review at the time, until it required its clients to repair their buildings.

    The coalition accused New York Community Bank of failing to meet its obligations under the Community Reinvestment Act, which requires that banks meet the credit needs of their communities — including, advocates say, by doing business in a way that strengthens community ties. A bank's compliance with the act can be reviewed when the bank is planning an acquisition.

    The coalition enlisted the help of Christine C. Quinn, the City Council speaker, who wrote a letter to the bank's president in February saying she was considering asking the state's Banking Department to hold public hearings and delay the merger "until the issue of poor building conditions is satisfactorily resolved."

    Julie Miles, the director of Housing Here and Now, said yesterday, "We've withdrawn our objection to the merger."

    Copyright 2006The New York Times Company

  8. #68

    Default Fairway moving here?

    I heard today that Fairway will be moving its main store into this building. Has anyone else heard this rumor?

  9. #69

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    ^ What's wrong with where it is now?

  10. #70
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    Quote Originally Posted by NewYrkrOne View Post
    I heard today that Fairway will be moving its main store into this building. Has anyone else heard this rumor?
    Oh I hope they do actually! That will be closer to where I live!

  11. #71
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    Quote Originally Posted by ablarc View Post
    ^ What's wrong with where it is now?
    That place is a mess. It is a 2 story building that has nothing special going for it. It should be demolished and something new should be built there. I kind of though that someday something will be built there and that fairway will have to leave. It is sad if it leaves the area. But hopefully 72nd street will be the place to move.

  12. #72

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    It's a massive crime that the nice building on the southwest corner of 72nd and B'Way will be razed, and the disgusting eyesore on the southeast corner that houses Sleepy's and Gray's will remain standing!

  13. #73
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    ^ That is true though. But I don't really care for that building that is been demolished that much really. I am ok that a new building will take its place. I am more upset that the new tower is awful. It should have been replace with something much nicer.

  14. #74

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    I think that the building being razed is really nice. It needs to be cleaned, but it has beautiful details. The adjacent buildings just to the south of it on B'Way are not nearly as nice.

  15. #75

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    Quote Originally Posted by londonlawyer View Post
    I think that the building being razed is really nice. It needs to be cleaned, but it has beautiful details. The adjacent buildings just to the south of it on B'Way are not nearly as nice.


    Quote Originally Posted by krulltime View Post
    That place [Fairway] is a mess. It is a 2 story building that has nothing special going for it. It should be demolished and something new should be built there. I kind of though that someday something will be built there and that fairway will have to leave. It is sad if it leaves the area. But hopefully 72nd street will be the place to move.


    Quote Originally Posted by ASchwarz View Post
    I also like the Alexandria. I think it's playful and distinctive.




    Quote Originally Posted by Fabrizio View Post
    It´s 72nd street and B´way... I think of literary-intellectual....and the solidity of those timeless brownstones and big old apartment houses in the area... a place that´s homey and neighborly... a bit of the Left Bank of Paris. What does THIS glass thing have anything to do with that?. OF COURSE the web-site and brochure will show those timeless brownstones and big old apartment houses in the area... a place that´s homey and neighborly... a bit of the Left Bank of Paris.

    Quote Originally Posted by ASchwarz View Post
    I doubt that horrific Sleepy's/hot dog building will last much longer. That has to be the ugliest building on the Upper West Side.

    I pray a developer is assembling the site.


    Quote Originally Posted by Fabrizio View Post
    Let's hope the Sleepys building remains...the group of buildings to the East are charming...tearing down the Sleepys building would mean tearing them down too.

    Losing those 2 and 3 story buildings along B'way means losing that left-bank quality the street has. Folks, it's NOT always about individual buildings...it's about the atmosphere created by a grouping of buildings. Those low buildings add to the street's charm and intimacy.


    Last edited by ablarc; August 18th, 2006 at 06:12 PM.

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