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Thread: Dubai

  1. #16
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RandySavage
    I would have hoped they would spend a portion of the $100 billion in construction on a complete, efficient, clean transportation system (electric monorail, for example). A city is only as great as its mass transit.
    some other possibilities ...






  2. #17
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    To answer my own question about transportation:

    "There is currently a $3.89 billion Dubai Metro project under construction for the emirate. The Metro system is expected to be partially operational by 2009 and fully operational by 2012. The construction contract for the project was given to Dubai Rapid Link (DURL)[12], a consortium lead by Mitsubishi Heavy Industries. Also involved are two other Japanese corporations, Obayashi and Kajima, and a Turkish company, Yapi Merkezi. The metro will comprise two lines: the Green Line from Rashidiya to the main city center and the Red Line from the airport to Jebel Ali. The Dubai Metro will have 70 kilometers of track and 43 stations, 33 above ground and ten underground. Trains are expected to run every 90 seconds when the project is completed. Dubai is building this train system to ease congestion on its road network and to meet the transportation demands of its growing population. Seven monorails are also slated to be constructed to help feed the Metro system, connecting various places such as Dubailand, Palm Jumeriah, et al, to the main track."

    Dubai is fascinating to me... this has got to be the greatest, fastest urban explosion of all-time.
    Last edited by RandySavage; March 2nd, 2006 at 04:57 PM.

  3. #18
    Forum Veteran MidtownGuy's Avatar
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    I agree. It is a dynamo, and will surpass New York in tall structures very soon. Burj Dubai will make the Freedom Tower look like a shrimp.

    8 towers currently being built that are the scale of NYC's Bank of America, 3 that are significantly larger and, of course, the Burj Dubai
    WOW!

  4. #19
    Build the Tower Verre antinimby's Avatar
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    What's more, all of them are very architectually interesting. There are almost not boxes.

  5. #20
    Forum Veteran MidtownGuy's Avatar
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    Architecturally, too many New Yorkers worship context, at the expense of creativity.

  6. #21
    Build the Tower Verre antinimby's Avatar
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    Exactly.
    It's one thing to preserve beautiful older buildings and another to want everything new to be made to look old. It's like these people want NY to always look like it's still in the 1890's. Context = conformity = uniformity = boring.

  7. #22
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    Dubai is demolishing many of its historic souks and paving over ancient oases to make room for new towers; let's not talk about the untold ecological damage that the construction of the palm islands and The World has wreaked and will continue to wreak. It's sweeping away much of its past in order to build the new city, and it's not the only one in Asia that's doing so. Shanghai, Bangkok, Beijing, Mumbai, Jakarta, and Kuala Lumpur, among others, have all lost much of their stock of historic buildings for the sake of "modernization."

    MidtownGuy, you yourself have posted time and again in support of preserving many of NYC's existing tenements and brownstones in the face of overwhelming new [not to mention often mediocre and out-of-context] development, and now post that you wish New York was more like Dubai. You can't have it both ways.

  8. #23
    Build the Tower Verre antinimby's Avatar
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    TL, I don't know why you're all worked up. From reading his posts, you know Midtown better than that. No one here wants to demolish anything of historic beauty.

  9. #24
    Forum Veteran MidtownGuy's Avatar
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    What we can have is a balance- and an artistic sense of the value of having old and new stand side by side. My posts have expressed my love for contrast and texture.
    I never said "I wish New York was more like Dubai". I want us to build more creatively, yes, while respecting historic beauty. Why must the two be mutually exclusive?

  10. #25

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    Quote Originally Posted by MidtownGuy
    I never said "I wish New York was more like Dubai".
    heh, that's a scary thought.

    dubai will never have something we have- a safe, reliable, and most of all comfortable subway system!



    This is IMO a bit sad, that country will have nothing but skyscrapers. Nothing else though. I mean we could convert each of our 2 billion dollar B-2 bombers into a supertall, but should we?

    you're so pretty, my baby, oh yes you are, oh yes you are...

  11. #26
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    Emirate Wakes Up Famous. Thank You, America.


    Stephanie Kuykendal for The New York Times
    Dubai was surprised by the ports hubbub, but also enthralled at the evidence
    that it had outdone its Arab neighbors.

    By HASSAN M. FATTAH
    NY Times
    March 2, 2006
    Letter From Dubai


    The New York Times
    Dubai offers Iranians and Arabs
    an almost Western lifestyle,
    with Middle East values.

    http://www.nytimes.com/2006/03/02/in...=1&oref=slogin

    DUBAI, United Arab Emirates, March 1 — As United States senators turned Dubai into a household word last week, life in this desert city hardly changed: skiers swooshed down a man-made snow park in the region's largest shopping mall, workers put the finishing touches on man-made islands under construction and men like Rashad Bukhash continued planning for the day when this city of one million would grow to three million.

    But hardly anyone spoke about the issue that has so consumed Washington: the management of terminals at six major American ports by DP World, a government-owned company here.

    Indeed, the most surprising aspect of the ports controversy here was, in fact, the lack of reaction: no scathing editorials, no demonstrations and certainly no talk of a Jewish conspiracy. Surprised, in part, but also enthralled, many here saw the ports firestorm as a stark example of how this economically ambitious state has surpassed its Arab neighbors.

    "People in Dubai are merchants," said Mr. Bukhash, who heads Dubai's planning department. "We know that when you pursue a deal, you can make a profit or you can lose. If you lose, you just move on. But at least now, when I say I am from Dubai, I know that people know where it is."

    Nevertheless, beyond Dubai's zany construction projects, frenetic growth plans and near obsession with superlatives, the ports uproar underscores for city officials and others the hurdles this city will face in its quest for modernity. Even as Dubai has struggled to shield itself from the Arab world's problems, the outcry has proved that the city will long be burdened by them.

    "It was an exercise you have to live with, win and then learn from," said Ghassan Tahboub, media manager at the executive office of Dubai's ruler, Sheik Mohammed bin Rashid al-Maktoum, the self-styled C.E.O. of the city.
    "This was America. There are lobbies, politics and interest groups, and Dubai found itself in the middle of a jungle. In the end I have to thank everybody there for this lesson."

    Many here readily admit that as Dubai emerges as a power on the global economic stage, it has much to learn about the "soft" aspects of business, from politics to public relations.

    "We don't have qualified people to speak," said Abdulkhaleq Abdulla, a professor of political science at Emirates University, speaking of the government. "They don't have experts and commentators. There's no political discourse in this city, and it showed."

    A prominent publicist who has been advising the government said the city needed to distinguish itself from other Arab cities and countries. "Dubai still has a big role in explaining who we are to the world," said the publicist, who requested anonymity because of the delicacy of implicitly criticizing other Arab countries. "Everybody knows who Dubai is in the region. But in America, Dubai is Arab, period."

    With native Emirati citizens accounting for only about 15 percent of the population, Arab may be the last word that comes to mind in describing this city. Indeed, the average resident here is more likely to speak English than Arabic, and more likely to be Asian than Arab. Many Indians jokingly refer to Dubai as "the best-run Indian city."

    Set across the Persian Gulf from Iran and just east of Saudi Arabia, Dubai is the financial capital of the United Arab Emirates, a federation of seven sheikdoms that won independence from Britain in 1971. But in stark contrast to many of its neighbors, Dubai more than two decades ago turned its back on oil and focused on diversifying its economy.

    Today, the city derives less than 15 percent of its revenue from oil, but greets more than five million tourists a year, many of them from Europe, and is the Middle East headquarters for more than 800 American companies. Like Singapore, long a model for the city, Dubai has also become a regional trade hub and a magnet for Arab, Iranian and Asian investors.

    "Dubai has been trying to prove to the rest of the Arab world that there is life after oil, and that in fact it's a better life," Mr. Abdulla said. "The good news is there is room for a second and a third Dubai, just like there was room for a second Singapore in Asia." The city is lucky in that its long-term strategy has come to fruition at a moment when other Arab states are flush with billions of oil dollars and seeking places to invest their newfound wealth.

    "This is an Arab city living in a unique moment in history," said Mr. Abdulla, who likens Dubai's stature in the Arab world today to that of Beirut in the 1960's and Cairo in the 1950's — capitals that defined the political direction for much of the region. But whereas those cities focused on the Arab world, Dubai has looked outward and embraces globalization.

    Other Arab states, particularly Qatar, Bahrain and Kuwait, would like to emulate Dubai, but it is not clear they will succeed. Those states may not have Dubai's penchant for finding opportunity in misfortune, nor its openness to outsiders and dedication to unfettered business dealings.

    In the 1980's it built strong relations with Iran by serving as a waypoint to the rest of the world and offering a lifeline during the Iran-Iraq war. In 1991, it became a haven for Kuwaitis who escaped Saddam Hussein's invading armies, then in 2003 it became a haven for Iraqis escaping the second gulf war. And in the years since, Dubai has gradually fashioned itself into a refuge for Iranians, Arabs and others who have eschewed the call to America or the West in exchange for a lifestyle that comes close, but is in keeping with Middle Eastern values.

    Modernity, however, has not come easy. With 85 percent of the population made up of foreigners, many of them second and third generation, the city faces a simmering demographic and identity crisis.

    Dubai is likely to confront numerous other questions as a 45-day investigation of its port management program gets under way, possibly illuminating the emirate's struggles with money laundering and other illicit activities. A spotty human rights record regarding foreign workers could also be a sticking point, along with its participation in a continuing Arab boycott of trade with Israel.

    In the end, Dubai may be pummeled in the ports controversy, but it will also have gained a lot, some officials say.

    "In the end, I think Dubai won," said Mr. Tahboub, the sheik's media manager.

    "We got a lot of publicity, and we deserve it, perhaps not in this manner, but we deserve the publicity."

    Mohammed Fadel Fahmy contributed reporting for this article.

    Copyright 2006The New York Times Company

  12. #27

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    The New York Times
    Dubai offers Iranians and Arabs
    an almost Western lifestyle,
    with Middle East values.
    what? does that even make sense?



    lol, had to edit, I looked at that pic and thought to myself, wow what a nice beach, I forgot the country is a desert. lol

  13. #28
    Forum Veteran macreator's Avatar
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    I am greatly impressed by Dubai's rapid growth, but while the City may gain a number of tall skyscrapers, it will never be New York in its urban feel, which arguably is the most important factor in a City.

    Dubai is totally un-friendly to the pedestrian. The City mainly relies on high-speed highways and wide boulevards for its traffic of cars and vans with no sidewalks in sight and it has blank walls abound. And while certain spots on the Palm islands may have "pathways", and one can always walk around at one of the City's gigantic malls, the City will never have a good walkability factor and thus not a great urban feel. Most of these enourmous skyscraper sit on huge blank pedestals. Because of this, Dubai will not be a place I'll be moving to in the near future.

  14. #29
    Build the Tower Verre antinimby's Avatar
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    We can knock Dubai all we want about lacking a transportation system and the urban feel and so on, but what it has demonstrated is that it possesses that "can do" attitude, something NY lost a long time ago. This alone will ensure that whatever Dubai needs or wants, it will get it done. Unlike NY, where all we do is talk (and in most cases, just argue) and nothings gets done in the end. What makes you think all the things its lacking right now, they won't work on next to make happen?

  15. #30
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by antinimby
    Unlike NY, where all we do is talk (and in most cases, just argue) and nothings gets done in the end.
    Ahh ... come on, get out of your apartment and look around

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