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Thread: the spread of midtown...

  1. #16

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    Yes, high intensity development generally is generally concentrated near high intensity public transit. Surely you can't just have realized this?

    Transportation is the flip side of infrastructure. It's very difficult to have one without the other. That's why midtown has overtaken downtown -- better transport links. That's why the best think you could do for downtown is improve its transport links (downtown has great subway access, but zero commuter rail). Midtown has train access from all three of Long Island, New Jersey and Connecticut. There's no question why it has become the commercial heart of the city.

    It's also why New Jersey development is primarily in Jersey City and Hoboken -- that's where PATH is.

    Quote Originally Posted by Ninjahedge
    I was just on the East Side near 3rd avenue (modtown) and one thing caught my attension....

    It seems lik ethe building of high-rise condos and offices follow the subway line down the island. As soon as you get a block or two away, you really do not have many huge buildings shooting up....


    Is it just me, or does there seem to be that invisible development line?

  2. #17
    Chief Antagonist Ninjahedge's Avatar
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    I realize this, but the odd thing is, people are more willing to build up along 3rd/Lex than they are to build an equal distance from the station but out East.

    There is a line. They have a good 10 blocks, I believe, between stops at 42nd and 53rd along the 4 (stops between the 7 and the E) but yet the bigger buildings only really go 1 block out east.

    People are willing to walk further along an avenue than along a street?

    Psychology?

  3. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by antinimby
    If you look at this aerial of Midtown, you will see how the title of this thread is really based out of misperception. Notice how the highrise section of Midtown is really only concentrated in a limited area of Manhattan while the lowrise areas are more dominant.
    yeah but if you look at the photo you can already see the new towers along 42nd street. Everything between 33rd street and 42nd street, 8th avenue to the river will fill in the towers -- some of them super tall (at least zoning says so, we'll see what the NIMBY's do). The onyl missing link is the 7 train extension to get it all started... also the photo misses how the entire UES and UWS are solidly tall buildings.

  4. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by czsz
    If the skyline is expanding anywhere, it's the opposite bank of the East River.
    The problem with Queens and Brooklyn, though, is the bedrock issue. Long Island was only made during the last couple of ice ages from glacial till that piled up (and became physically what it is today only 10,000 years ago). Because of this, LI's bedrock may not be able to support skyscrapers that are of the caliber of Manhattan...maybe Jersey City of White Plains, but not Manhattan.

  5. #20
    Build the Tower Verre antinimby's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by elfgam
    yeah but if you look at the photo you can already see the new towers along 42nd street. Everything between 33rd street and 42nd street, 8th avenue to the river will fill in the towers -- some of them super tall (at least zoning says so, we'll see what the NIMBY's do). The onyl missing link is the 7 train extension to get it all started... also the photo misses how the entire UES and UWS are solidly tall buildings.
    Nothing in NY is EVER a given. The economy changes, the city's fortunes won't always be like this, and who knows, demand may decline also, so one never knows. Zonings will and have changed so I wouldn't put too much faith in them. Even if the zoning allows for increased density, once residents move in, it would be very difficult to build. They will no doubt protest. If you follow the Orion thread (one of those towers you see on 42nd St.), the people there are already worried about the possibility of other buildings going up in the area and blocking their views. Their building isn't completed yet and they haven't even moved in yet! The mentality among Manhattanites is that there shouldn't be any buildings except for their own.

  6. #21
    Senior Swanky Peteynyc1's Avatar
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    Although there is building going on in LI City, it still has a LONG way to go. I think Manhattan will always be of choice for the reason of transportation and access. Yeah Roosevelt is so close, but why do most prefer Manhattan over it? If you aren't a late nite subway rider, you can't just jump in a <$10 cab to get home.

  7. #22
    Build the Tower Verre antinimby's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by elfgam
    also the photo misses how the entire UES and UWS are solidly tall buildings.
    Solidly tall?
    Really?
    Please at least know your facts before stating them so boldly.
    This aerial will show otherwise.

  8. #23

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    Almost every uptown block between the avenues is filled with walkup townhouses or small apartment buildings. Hardly solidly tall.

  9. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by TomAuch
    The problem with Queens and Brooklyn, though, is the bedrock issue. Long Island was only made during the last couple of ice ages from glacial till that piled up (and became physically what it is today only 10,000 years ago). Because of this, LI's bedrock may not be able to support skyscrapers that are of the caliber of Manhattan...maybe Jersey City of White Plains, but not Manhattan.

    The bedrock was an issue when massive buildings such as ESB were constructed. These buildings were heavy and drilling technology wasn't advanced. However with the advent of more light weight buildings that sway, it has become a non issue. The same skyscrapers can be built in Queens and Brooklyn as in Manhattan Thats why you see world's tallest buildings going up in places like Dubai

  10. #25

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    Quote Originally Posted by bkmonkey
    The bedrock was an issue when massive buildings such as ESB were constructed. These buildings were heavy and drilling technology wasn't advanced. However with the advent of more light weight buildings that sway, it has become a non issue. The same skyscrapers can be built in Queens and Brooklyn as in Manhattan Thats why you see world's tallest buildings going up in places like Dubai
    Not to mention Shanghai. The whole place is river mud.

  11. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by ddjiii
    Not to mention Shanghai. The whole place is river mud.
    Yes, and now it's sinking.

  12. #27
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    ^ true?

  13. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by lofter1
    ^ true?
    This is indeed true. Shanghai is built over underground waters, as mentioned, and over the years the City of Shanghai has literally sunk themselves as they built heavy skyscrapers but more importantly, use ground water for drinking water and thus undermine the support of the ground they are living on. The government there has suspended construction of skyscrapers in many areas as they literally re-pump in water and fill under the City to keep things from sinking further. They've also had to figure out a better way to provide drinking water to the City.

  14. #29
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by macreator
    The government there has suspended construction of skyscrapers in many areas as they literally re-pump in water and fill under the City to keep things from sinking further.
    That's one way to keep the billions of Chinese citizens working ...

    Pump away, Comrade!

  15. #30

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    Quote Originally Posted by lofter1
    ^ true?
    OK, this is off topic, but I was curious too, and look what I found thanks to Google:

    http://www.chinadaily.com.cn/en/doc/...ent_289290.htm

    If the China Daily says it, it must be true!

    Seriously, this is pretty scary. This is also the first time I've ever seen the China Daily, which is a government paper, quote an official who "declined to be identified."

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