Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 16 to 30 of 33

Thread: Chelsea Arts Tower - 545 West 25th St - Commercial Condo -by Kossar & Garry

  1. #16

    Default Good Architecture

    Quote Originally Posted by antinimby View Post
    Don't understand the blankwall on the eastern face (maybe for structural purposes?).The area's been downzoned.
    Mabe a Knox Martin GRAPHIC. (inside joke folks)



    But seriously; good Architecture.
    Last edited by infoshare; December 12th, 2006 at 07:15 PM.

  2. #17

    Default

    Deconstruction In the City

    The New York Sun - Architecture
    By JAMES GARDNER
    November 15, 2006


    Few architectural artifacts attest more eloquently to the changing fortunes of Chelsea than the nearly completed tower at 545 W. 25th St., which rises, all-seeing and all-seen, over one of the most incandescent neighborhoods in Manhattan. This sight, we may imagine, is how the Woolworth Building felt back in 1913, when it soared up, in splendid isolation, over the humbled building stock of lower Broadway.

    In flagrant resistance to the overwhelming tide of Gotham real estate, however, the new 21-story Chelsea Arts Center is not destined to be a residence, but a commercial condominium. Like the fabled Fuller Building at 57th Street and Madison Avenue, it will apparently be stacked vertically with wall-to-wall galleries. Already the first two floors have been sold to the Marlborough Gallery, which has the means to move anywhere it wants. Their new space, designed by Thierry Despont, is supposed to open in the spring.

    As for the building itself, less than a year ago this tower was little more than a notion, and now it rises above the world of contemporary art in a distinguished design by the little known firm of Kossar & Garry Architects. You can count this building as yet one more scion, the fifth by my counting, of Christian de Portzemparc's LVMH ( Louis Vuitton Moët Hennessy) Building at 13 E. 57th St. It emerges in a facetted mass that attests to the now pervasive and once radical style known as Deconstruction. A variety of planes fracture and intersect across the surface, which frees itself from its base about half way along and picks up three cantilevered balconies before it hits the top.

    With the possible exception of Kohn Pedersen Fox's 505 Fifth Ave., this is perhaps the best of the five sons of LVMH, and better than the parent building to boot. Certain details, like the way the curtain wall of the base eccentrically inhabits the masonry box that frames it, are quite masterful. It is in the nature of Deconstructivist buildings that they offer very different prospects depending upon the angle from which they are seen. That they should be visually interesting from all angles is a tall order, but the Chelsea Arts Tower manages to pull it off. Not the least difference between it and all its predecessors is that, whereas all of them are much darker buildings than LVMH, this latest arrival relies far more on the integration of masonry amid the curtain walls, whose darkness is enlivened by paler steel mullions than in the earlier buildings. Finally, despite the fractured energy of the façade, a strong narrow line of masonry descends the eastern side, giving ballast and support to the composition as a whole.



    Anyone know what Gardner considers the other 3 sons of LVMH?
    Chelsea Arts Tower
    505 Fifth Avenue

    American Folk Art Museum?
    Greenwich Lofts?
    Switch Building?
    Austrian Cultural Institute?
    Bronx Museum of the Arts Expansion?
    Blue?

  3. #18

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Derek2k3 View Post
    Anyone know what Gardner considers the other 3 sons of LVMH?
    Chelsea Arts Tower
    505 Fifth Avenue

    American Folk Art Museum?
    Greenwich Lofts?
    Switch Building?
    Austrian Cultural Institute?
    Bronx Museum of the Arts Expansion?
    Blue?
    Interesting question. Email him and ask.

    This building has good scale due to its small footprint, slender proportions and frequency of facade event. Chelsea could use more of these, so it's sad they've just been zoned out of existence.

    Mindless. Especially since that zoning must have been passed when this building was already there to demonstrate the desirability of this pattern. Instead of limiting the height of buildings, they should limit lot size (hence footprint). Same goes for Lower East Side.

    .
    Last edited by ablarc; December 29th, 2006 at 05:47 PM.

  4. #19

    Default





    thanks to urbanflyer, ssp.

  5. #20
    Build the Tower Verre antinimby's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    in Limbo
    Posts
    8,976

    Default

    That picture would give NIMBYs here a heart attack.

    Forget the density, the signage alone would drive them to immediately fire off angry letters to their representatives demanding legislation.

    And the high speed train?

    Forget about it.

  6. #21

    Default

    ^ and how 'bout that red building?

  7. #22
    Build the Tower Verre antinimby's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    in Limbo
    Posts
    8,976

    Default

    They would cry "out-of-context."

  8. #23

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by antinimby View Post
    Don't understand the blankwall on the eastern face (maybe for structural purposes?).

    It's not like someone's going to come along and build an equally tall tower next to them.

    The area's been downzoned.
    Service core.

  9. #24

    Default

    Chelsea Arts Tower.


  10. #25
    Banned Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Park Slope, Brooklyn, NY
    Posts
    8,113

    Default

    This building is a beauty amongst those horrid crap new buildings on West 23rd & 24th Street. The design is rather stunning against the bland backdrop and neighborhood it sits in.

  11. #26

  12. #27
    Forum Veteran krulltime's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Manhattan - UWS
    Posts
    4,208

    Default

    ^ That tower turn out to be great. I even like the blank wall. Nice patterns and color.

  13. #28

    Default

    Beautiful. How nice black and grey is. And the blank wall looks like thought went into it.

  14. #29
    Crabby airline hostess - stache's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Nairobi Hilton
    Posts
    8,511

    Thumbs down That blank wall is like a giant tumor.

    I see it far too often.

  15. #30

    Default

    The thing is one mid-2000s cliche after another, but it works. I like it.

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. The High Line: elevated railroad in Chelsea
    By Edward in forum New York City Guide For Visitors
    Replies: 837
    Last Post: January 19th, 2015, 01:16 AM
  2. Min. Bldg Distance in Chelsea/Manhattan - Distance between b
    By Quakes in forum New York Real Estate
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: May 9th, 2003, 10:54 AM
  3. State of the Commercial Market
    By Kris in forum New York Real Estate
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: January 9th, 2003, 03:00 AM
  4. Making a Change in Chelsea: Rentals Go Co-op
    By Edward in forum New York Real Estate
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: December 12th, 2002, 12:04 PM
  5. Lehman Bros. Grapples With Arts Zoning Rules
    By Edward in forum New York Real Estate
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: January 10th, 2002, 11:37 PM

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  


Google+ - Facebook - Twitter - Meetup

Edward's photos on Flickr - Wired New York on Flickr - In Queens - In Red Hook - Bryant Park - SQL Backup Software