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Thread: NYPD Police - Covering The Cops

  1. #46

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    The NYPD has ~35,000 officers. That's the population of a good sized town. You can't have a force that big and have at least a few member going south at any given time.

    Quote Originally Posted by EastMillinocket View Post
    Where are the good apples?

  2. #47
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    ^ "at least a few" seems to be understating it somewhat.


    Let's leave the "broken windows" trend out of it, guys. It's not at all what this issue is about. Stop with the smoke and mirrors.


    How 'Broken Windows' Could Stand In The Way Of Real Change For The NYPD

    by Christopher Mathias

    Keeshan Harley is only 19 years old, but he says he’s been stopped by New York City police more than 100 times. Last year, cops apprehended him for riding his bike on the sidewalk in Bedford-Stuyvesant, Brooklyn.

    “I was handcuffed and threatened by undercover officers for riding my bike on the sidewalk for a mere three minutes as a bus passed to avoid being hit,” he told reporters outside City Hall on Thursday. “They never produced badges but proceeded to try and intimidate me.”

    Experiences like that, Harley said, make him understand how Eric Garner must have felt when cops tried to arrest him for allegedly selling untaxed cigarettes two weeks ago in Staten Island. A video shows the 43-year-old father yelling at the cops for harassing him, before one officer, Daniel Pantaleo, puts Garner into a chokehold, throwing him to the ground. Garner, who can be heard screaming “I can’t breathe!” numerous times, later died.

    Harley was among a group of activists and lawmakers who gathered Thursday to call for the city to prosecute the officers involved in Garner’s death. Many of the attendees were also deeply critical of a policing theory put into practice by New York City Police Department Commissioner William Bratton. The "Broken Windows" philosophy holds that targeting low-level offenses helps to curb more serious crime.

    “We need a very hard look at the aggressive enforcement of low-level offenses, whether that’s selling loose cigarettes, playing your music too loud on the subway, or having your bag next to you, or whether that’s having a marijuana cigarette in your pocket,” City Council member Brad Lander told reporters at the rally Thursday. This type of enforcement, he said, disproportionately affects men of color -- like Harley and Garner -- and can have terrible collateral consequences.

    While Lander stopped short of explicitly calling out Broken Windows, other lawmakers didn't.

    “The death of Eric Garner was preventable,” Council member Antonio Reynoso said in a statement Thursday. “It was a tragic example of how Broken Windows policing targets low-income people and people of color with aggressive tactics for minor infractions.” Assembly member Karim Camara and City Council member Jumaane Williams also released statements referencing Broken Windows by name.

    For years, Broken Windows was credited with reducing the crime rate in cities across the country, including New York, Philadelphia and Seattle. Critics, however, say there’s no data to support that claim, and that the strategy unfairly targets minorities. At Thursday’s event, one protester held a sign that read, "Broken Windows=Broken Lives."

    This time last year, many of these same protesters and lawmakers called on then-Mayor Michael Bloomberg to put an end to the NYPD’s excessive use of stop and frisk, a tactic where police stop people on the street and often search them. During Bloomberg’s 12 years as mayor, the NYPD stopped hundreds of thousands of New Yorkers, the vast majority of whom were black or Latino.

    “I think a lot of what was upsetting people about stop and frisk was really about Broken Windows, but we didn’t have the language,” Alex Vitale, a sociology professor at Brooklyn College, told HuffPost on Thursday. The death of Eric Garner changed that, he said. Now, people know about Broken Windows and are angry.

    The tension over the policing philosophy has put Mayor Bill de Blasio in an awkward position. De Blasio campaigned on the idea that he would reform the NYPD, namely by reining in the department’s use of stop and frisk. He selected Bill Bratton as his police commissioner in December with a promise to not only end the use of stop and frisk, but also to usher in a new era of police-community relations.

    Bratton, however, championed Broken Windows policing during his first stint as New York’s police commissioner in the 1990s. And over the past seven months, it’s become evident that he’s still a big proponent of the philosophy.

    The NYPD has made 97,487 misdemeanor arrests during de Blasio’s first five months as mayor, Gothamist reported on Thursday. That’s slightly more than the number of misdemeanor arrests during the first five months of 2013, Bloomberg’s final year in office. Eighty-six percent of those arrested for misdemeanors in the first five months of this year were black or Latino, about the same percentage as under Bloomberg, according to Gothamist, which looked at New York State Division of Criminal Justice Services data.

    And despite De Blasio’s promises to reform the department, the mayor earlier this week defended Broken Windows. "I can understand why any New Yorker may say, that's not such a big offense," he said at a press conference Monday. "But a violation of the law is a violation of the law.”

    While protesters rallied outside City Hall Thursday, de Blasio was inside hosting a "Roundtable on Police-Community Relations.” He was introduced by his Community Affairs Commissioner Marco Carrion as “our mayor, the man who put an end to stop and frisk.” The mayor sat in between Bratton and the Rev. Al Sharpton, who’s called for the cops involved in Eric Garner’s death to be prosecuted.

    "Given the data that we are seeing in terms of these Broken Window kind of operations, it’s disproportionate in the black and Latino communities," Sharpton said at the meeting, according to The New York Observer. He then turned towards de Blasio.

    "If Dante wasn't your son, he would be a candidate for a chokehold," he said, referring to the mayor’s 17-year-old son, who is half-black.

    As Captial New York’s Azi Paybarah noted, neither de Blasio nor Bratton mentioned Broken Windows by name during Thursday’s roundtable. Bratton, however, did say that the department “has been deficient, in my perspective, in the training it gives to its officers” when it comes to enforcing low-level offenses. Cops, he said, need to know “they have a wide range of discretion to work with: ‘move along,’ summons, admonishment, potential and, if resistance is met, the use of force.”

    De Blasio has endorsed the idea of better training for cops. But some groups, like the New York Civil Liberties Union, have argued that until Broken Windows is abandoned, real change within the NYPD is not possible. As the Eric Garner saga continues to unfold, it’s unclear if de Blasio and Bratton would be open to the kind of systemic changes to the NYPD that these advocates are calling for.

    "It's time to end Broken Windows and put the police department's priorities where they ought to be: on violent crime. No New Yorker should be the collateral damage of these misguided, zero-tolerance, Broken Windows policies that target our communities of color and alienate people from the police," Donna Lieberman, the executive director of the NYCLU, said Thursday at the rally.

    Lander was careful Thursday to praise de Blasio for his work to rein in stop and frisk, but added that it was time for the city to take a “serious, hard look” at what’s being enforced by police, and what should be enforced. This fall, he said, the council could consider a “range of legislation,” including a series of bills to be introduced by Council member Rory Lancman.

    For two mothers whose sons were killed in altercations with the NYPD, however, what's most important is that the officers involved in Eric Garner’s death be brought to justice.

    “Neither the problem nor the solution to systemic police brutality is simply new training, as Commissioner Bratton has indicated and we heard after the deaths of our sons and so many other New Yorkers,” Constance Malcolm, the mother of Ramarley Graham, and Iris Baez, the mother of Anthony Baez, said in a joint statement Thursday. “It is the lack of true accountability that has allowed officers to continue to abuse, and too often kill, New Yorkers without fear of real consequences.”

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/0...&ir=New%20York

  3. #48
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    What I would really want to know is what Pantaleo says when the ask him not why he put Garner in a chokehold to begin with, but why he did not let go when it was clear that he was subdued??
    (Wresling fan?)

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    from the above article:

    "“We need a very hard look at the aggressive enforcement of low-level offenses, whether that’s selling loose cigarettes, playing your music too loud on the subway, or having your bag next to you, or whether that’s having a marijuana cigarette in your pocket,” City Council member Brad Lander told reporters at the rally Thursday. This type of enforcement, he said, disproportionately affects men of color -- like Harley and Garner -- and can have terrible collateral consequences.

    While Lander stopped short of explicitly calling out Broken Windows, other lawmakers didn't.

    “The death of Eric Garner was preventable,” Council member Antonio Reynoso said in a statement Thursday. “It was a tragic example of how Broken Windows policing targets low-income people and people of color with aggressive tactics for minor infractions.” Assembly member Karim Camara and City Council member Jumaane Williams also released statements referencing Broken Windows by name. "

    Law enforcement should be blind to race or income. If a crime is committed, the officer shouldn't stop to think, "hey too many of this race were arrested today, that's just not fair". It doesn't work like that. I get that a lot of the offenders are low income - should we cut them a break too when they start breaking in and shooting people? You police the crime where the crime is, and if the people don't like it then maybe they should stop committing the crimes

  5. #50

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    Law enforcement should be blind to race or income.
    But in NYC they are not!
    One big problem is the cops here just don't listen... Example:

    There was a group of people down in the village (I saw this firsthand), being badly harassed by this white guy who was being a complete asshole...
    The cops were called. When they arrived, instead of questioning/picking up the guy responsible,
    they grabbed the only person of colour in the crowd.
    We were all yelling that they grabbed the wrong guy- but they would not listen.
    They violently threw this man down to the ground and cuffed him- ignoring his (and the crowds) pleas of his innocence.
    It was one of the most racist actions by cops I had ever witnessed.

  6. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by GordonGecko View Post
    Law enforcement should be blind to race or income. If a crime is committed, the officer shouldn't stop to think, "hey too many of this race were arrested today, that's just not fair". It doesn't work like that. I get that a lot of the offenders are low income - should we cut them a break too when they start breaking in and shooting people? You police the crime where the crime is, and if the people don't like it then maybe they should stop committing the crimes
    I think this POV distorts the actual issue. As you say yourself, "It doesn't work like that." And nor should it.

    Also needless to say, as SM has pointed out, the NYPD are NOT blind to race or income, so it's a moot point.

    Apart from predominantly inappropriate behaviour by police when dealing with people who may actually have done something wrong, the main issue is about people who have either committed minor offences or nothing at all being unfairly targeted and inappropriately treated because of race and/or economic circumstances.

    How about if, just for a change, authorities started to deal with the causes of issues, instead of inappropriately dealing with the symptoms; for example, the reasons for crime amongst lower income groups. It's just too easy to do it the other way around, though, obviously.

    "Police the crime where the crime is...". Yes. But do it appropriately and fairly, and with a measure of flexibility and compassion, not thuggery and hooliganism.

    "...and if the people don't like it then maybe they should stop committing the crimes". If only life were that simple, GG. Cause and effect.

    ...oh, and don't come back with "but not all disadvantaged people commit crime". That argument could be applied to a lot of things, but we're talking about human beings here.

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    well yes, they are human beings - but they affect other human beings by their actions. I agree there needs to be more done to address the cause, and flexibility is important. But it's a slippery slope as to where you draw a line between what you can let slide and what you need to be intolerant of. Obviously there's no place for racist cops and harassment based on baseless suspicion, but the people complaining about being targeted for their petty crimes really have no one to blame but themselves

  8. #53

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    EMTs Turn In Cops Who Beat A Handcuffed Patient

    By Sophie Weiner | August 5, 2014 - 09:00AM

    Police officers beat a handcuffed man on a stretcher, according to two FNDY EMTs, the Daily News reports. The EMTs were called to the 67th Precinct in Brooklyn to restrain an emotionally disturbed patient for transport on July 20th. They described the patient as “combative” and witnessed him spit in the face of an officer. The report describes what happened next:
    Pt. came out of the cell in cuffs. Pt. became combative with PD and (was) put on our stretcher.
    Pt. was struck in the face by an officer … pt. spit in the face of an officer, whereupon the officer punched the pt. in the face multiple times.
    Three cops began to punch the patient in the face, EMS (had) to get in the middle of it to intervene. Pt’s. wounds and injuries cleaned in the (ambulance).
    The report also notes that the patient came out in “handcuffs and foot shackles.” The cops grabbed and threw the patient to the ground, then tossed him back onto the stretcher.
    The emergency medical technicians filed the complaint after physically intervening in the altercation. The Internal Affairs Bureau is investigating.


    Tags: 67th precinct, ABUSE, EMT, Mental Illness, NYPD, Police Brutality
    http://animalnewyork.com/2014/emts-t...uffed-patient/

  9. #54
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    At Hearing On NYPD Force, The '5,000-Pound Elephant In The Room' Is 'Broken Windows'

    by Christopher Mathias

    It took two hours during Monday’s packed City Council hearing with NYPD Commissioner William Bratton for someone to mention “broken windows.” It was council member Robert Cornegy (D-Brooklyn) who finally broached the subject, calling the controversial policing strategy the “5,000-pound elephant in the room.”

    Cornegy made the remark while questioning Bratton about the NYPD’s continued crackdown on subway dancers, a classic example of the policing theory that holds that targeting low-level offenses helps curb more serious crime.

    “I’m extremely concerned that too many New Yorkers just doing what they do to get by in these tough times are being charged with crimes even when their activities are classified as violations and not misdemeanors,” Cornegy told Bratton, adding that the crackdown could amount to “the over-criminalizing of New Yorkers participating” in an “informal economy.”

    Bratton, who championed broken windows policing during an earlier stint as NYPD commissioner in the ‘90s, responded sternly that subway cars are “not for dancing” and that the performers are a danger to passengers.

    To the disappointment of many in the audience, this brief exchange, and a couple short discussions later in the hearing, were the closest New York has come to a formal, public debate on broken windows. Monday’s hearing instead centered around Bratton’s new plan to retrain 20,000 NYPD officers every year. The retraining, which would cost $25 million to $30 million a year, would focus on defusing conflicts with uncooperative suspects, the proper use of force, and using summonses and warnings as alternatives to arrest.

    The changes stem from the death of Eric Garner this summer. Garner, a black 43-year-old father of six, died after a white NYPD officer, Daniel Pantaleo, put him into a banned chokehold during an arrest in Staten Island for selling untaxed cigarettes. A viral video shows Garner screaming “I can’t breathe!” numerous times before his body goes limp. A medical examiner ruled his death homicide.

    The death spurred intense criticism of broken windows, with critics arguing that there’s no evidence to support its effectiveness in preventing serious crime. A NY Daily News analysis showed the dramatic racial disparities in how low-level crimes are enforced in New York.

    “There was no real need to arrest Mr. Garner or to use the level of force that we all saw on the video tape,” Alex Vitale, a sociology professor at Brooklyn College, said in a statement submitted to the council Monday. “A civilian inspector could just as easily come and issued a citation. For those who think arrest is a better solution I will point out that Mr. Garner was arrested dozens of previous times and it seems to have had no positive impact on his behavior or life circumstances.”

    There are “civilian alternatives to relying on police work” for enforcing low-level crimes, Vitale added, that “are much cheaper to implement, more effective, and less likely to have long term negative consequences for those who are currently arrested and ticketed.”

    Daneil Loehr, an investigator with legal group the Bronx Defenders, spoke during “public comment” portion of Monday’s hearing, after all but two city council members and most reporters had left.

    “Training can only do so much while the strategy of broken windows policing remains intact,” Loehr said. “Whether the officers are trained or not, the encounters designed by broken windows policing increase the odds of misconduct and created distrust due to the volume of police encounters it generates and the disparate targeting of communities of color.”

    Josmar Trujillo, of New Yorkers Against Bratton, told HuffPost he was disappointed at the “softball questions” many council members posed to Bratton.

    He said the call for training, although a “politically savvy” response to Garner’s death, does little to address the “fundamental” problems with broken windows. The council, Trujillo added, needs a hearing on broken windows “immediately.”

    Since Garner’s death, a handful of council members and other New York lawmakers have publicly criticized broken windows. After Monday’s hearing, council Speaker Melissa Mark-Viverito told reporters that the policing strategy “would be something that we would want to cover possibly in a subsequent hearing.”

    But even if the council were to reform the NYPD’s embrace of broken wndows, it’s unclear whether Mayor Bill de Blasio would support such a move. Despite coming into office this year with a promise to end stop and frisk, and to improve the NYPD’s relationship with communities of color, de Blasio has thus far been steadfast in his support of Bratton’s use of broken windows.

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/0...rk&ir=New+York

  10. #55

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    New Yorkers Against Bratton - awesome - i can't stand this stooge - (his denials being one of the biggist problems with the department).

    New Study Shows “Broken Windows” Targets Minorities In Low-Crime Neighborhoods


    By Sophie Weiner | September 9, 2014 - 09:30AM


    Police Commissioner Bill Bratton has repeatedly defended the NYPD’s “broken windows” policy, a style of enforcement that disproportionately targets minorities. He claims that it’s the troubled nature of black and Hispanic neighborhoods that cause the concentration of this sort of police activity, not police racism. The Daily Newsanalysis of data shows this isn’t true — minorities are given summonses at much higher numbers, even in primarily white neighborhoods with little crime.

    The statistics proving this inequality are dramatic:

    The disparity in summons activity is highest in the 24th Precinct (Upper West Side – North), where blacks and Hispanics make up just 34% of the population but received an estimated 84% of the summonses, and the 84th Precinct (Brooklyn Heights, DUMBO), where they made up 28% of the population but received 78% of the summonses — both a spread of 50 percentage points.


    That’s followed by the 20th Precinct (Upper West Side – South) with a 48-point spread, the 19th Precinct (Upper East Side – South) with a 43-point spread, and the 13th Precinct (Gramercy) with a 42-point spread.


    The analysis also found blacks and Hispanics received the vast majority of summonses for scores of common offenses, such as disorderly conduct (88%), loitering (89%), spitting (92%) and failure to have a dog license (91%) — even though the Health Department estimates that less than 17% of dogs citywide are licensed.

    The 6.9 million court summons used in the Daily News analysis were almost entirely under the rule of commissioner Ray Kelly. They narrowed these down to the 1.7 million that contained racial data.


    In 2010, a new summons document removed race from the form police must fill out. This has lead to fewer and fewer forms containing racial information, down to only 2% last year. Bratton told reporters that the form was changed by the state and he would “not be opposed to bringing back to those forms that classification.” Under Bratton, there have been 15% fewer summons this year compared to 2013. (Photo: baltimoredave)



    http://animalnewyork.com/2014/new-st...w-crime-areas/
    Last edited by scumonkey; September 9th, 2014 at 02:56 PM.

  11. #56
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    And they needed yet another "new study" to determine that?

    That bit about "common offences" is just laughable. Not the statistics, mind, just the pettiness of the offences. "Failure to have a dog licence"... . Dem broken windows dey be broke.

    Exactly what the hell does Bratton mean by the generalisation "troubled nature of black and Hispanic neighborhoods"? He probably doesn't actually know. What an idiot.

    Apart from the obvious, long recognised, disparity between the groups, thanks to idiots like him and the media, reportage of problems relating to non-white people is much more prevalent than for white people.

    And I only use the term "white" for illustrative purposes. It somehow always makes me feel sick.

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    Obviously the statement "troubled nature of black and Hispanic neighborhoods" is offensive and ill advised, however the law is the law and it should be enforced. The broken windows policy is tool usually used to tackle the bigger problems like robbery & assault to get potential offenders inspected and in the system. It just happens that the areas with the biggest crime problems are typically minority areas, and the way the NYPD addresses the problem is to start with the minor offenses. On the upper east side, Marge might not have a valid license for her poodle but the cops don't really care because they're not out looking for people with concealed weapons there.

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    Quote Originally Posted by GordonGecko View Post
    The broken windows policy is tool usually used to tackle the bigger problems like robbery & assault to get potential offenders inspected and in the system.
    No, it's not. Exactly the opposite.

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    Yeah actually it is, it's a pillar of Bratton & Giuliani's successful strategy to sharply reduce crime

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    ^ Misunderstanding on my part, I think. Broken Windows in theory may be laudable but in practice it's broken (i.e. misused and abused).

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