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Thread: Manhattan's Toy Center to become apartments

  1. #1

    Default Manhattan's Toy Center to become apartments

    current | subscribeCITY PLANNING COMMISSION
    Rezoning/Special Permit
    Chelsea, Manhattan

    Manhattan's Toy Center to become apartments


    Rezoning will allow Chelsea’s International Toy Center to be converted for residential use. 200 Fifth, LLC applied to rezone 200 Fifth Avenue and 1107 Broadway in Chelsea, Manhattan, to allow conversion of manufacturing/commercial buildings to residences with an expected 500 units. The buildings, located between Sixth Avenue and Broadway, along West 23rd and 25th Streets, are home to The International Toy Center and nearly 300 toy companies, many of which have been tenants since 1938. The map amendment would replace M1-6 with C5-2 on two blocks, permitting residential and commercial use without altering the FAR or height limits. 200 Fifth also applied for a special permit to construct a 54-space attended garage on the site to service the new residences.

    At the February 8, 2006 Commission hearing, there were no speakers in opposition. Manhattan Borough President Scott Stringer’s representative, Anthony Borelli, advocated approval on condition that current tenants have access to the building for the February 2006 toy fair. The Toy Industry Association also spoke in favor and noted 200 Fifth’s agreement to allow tenants to remain for the toy fair and provide relocation assistance. A representative from the Economic Development Corporation spoke about its efforts to keep the toy industry in New York City by helping relocate the tenants.

    The Commission approved the application on March 8, 2006 by a vote of 11-1 with Commissioner Karen Phillips voting against it. In approving, the Commission noted that recent development has changed the area’s character and that the City will benefit from additional housing without significantly disrupting the neighborhood.

    ULURP Process: The Planning Commission, as lead agency, issued a negative declaration on November 14, 2005. Community Board 5 disapproved by a vote of 29-1-1. On January 18, 2006, newly elected Manhattan Borough President Scott Stringer recommended approval with conditions. City Council review is pending.

    CPC: Madison Park West (C 060210 ZMM – map amendment) (C 060211 ZSM – special permit) (March 8, 2006).

  2. #2
    Forum Veteran macreator's Avatar
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    Isn't this pretty old news?

    And don't we also have a thread on the Toy Center?

  3. #3
    Crabby airline hostess - stache's Avatar
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    Default This is getting ridiculous.

    Soon no one will actually work in Manhattan, except maybe doormen and porters. Every building will be a condo.

  4. #4
    Forum Veteran macreator's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by stache
    Soon no one will actually work in Manhattan, except maybe doormen and porters. Every building will be a condo.
    While exaggerated, your comment has truth to it. The loss of the Toy Industry is indicative of a bigger problem.

  5. #5

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    It's true of Paris to a great extent...what's so terrible about it happening here?

  6. #6

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    ^
    NY needs a larger tax base than all residential could provide, especially with the social services the city offers. NY isn't subsidized by the federal gov't like Paris is.

  7. #7

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    Perhaps those that govern Zoning would then realize the need for commercial buildings to have a min height restriction. Say in select areas of the city there would be a 900ft (or what ever Sq footage that equals) of commercial space requirment. After that you can add all the residential space on top of 900ft that you want. Also, what about commercial space trading?

    That might solve the problem, and give an impressive skyline to boot!

  8. #8
    Build the Tower Verre antinimby's Avatar
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    I like your idea but realize that there is suppose to be a certain height at which it becomes uneconomical to build past, due to higher costs for construction, complex engineering, more elevators, etc. than the return one gets.
    Even if an area is upzoned to infinity, it doesn't mean developers will all scramble to build really tall towers. Requiring them to build at least 900 ft., will for sure, prevent most of them from even getting off the ground. In other words, it might just stifle development not encourage it.

  9. #9

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    ^^
    900ft was somewhat of an arbitrary number (I was going to say 1000ft but even I thought that was a little nuts for a hypo.)

    I see and agree with your point.

    I guess my statement should have been more about the necessity of retaining sq footage regardless of where. For example, if you convert the toy factory to residences you basically have a debt to the city of commercial space. You can sell that debt to a person who would like to build more commercial space than is zoned in a different or the same area. Thereby allowing a market for maintaining the commercial space as well as an end run around Nimbies (from your name I assume you don’t object) for making larger projects because it is in the good of the "community"

  10. #10
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    Maximum zoning heights are somewhat controlled by fire safety issues. Much of NYC building code also ties in with lessons learned from experience by FDNY.

  11. #11

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    ^
    oh I can imagine. I am not sugessting that you have to build wildy unsafe super towers every time you convert a lowrise into a residential. Take the Orion. A building like that is tall but not very tall. You could add a 20 story commercial base to it and not really have a fire problem...I think. I am not really well versed in building code. It just seams from a economic standpoint that most of what is getting built is for the wealthy and it is replacing commercial space that would attract low end office workers. The net reuslt being that low end wage earners have no place to work and no place to live, all the while with some person telling you that any solution would be "out of character"

  12. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by macreator
    While exaggerated, your comment has truth to it. The loss of the Toy Industry is indicative of a bigger problem.
    not true.. Midtown is growing at a huge rate. Dowtown will begin to grow once the WTC is rebuilt. Dont confuse short term shifts in the market with long term trends. In fact, there are more office workers working in manhattan than they were twenty years ago. Thats why the transit strike created such chaos.

  13. #13

    Default International Toy Center North Building - by H. Craig Servance & William Van Alen

    Tessler is converting 1107 Broadway to Condos while Chetrit is finishing up converting 200 Fifth into Class A offices.
    ODA must be some kind of spinoff from Perkins Eastman.

    The International Toy Center North Building







    Office for Design & Architecture
    http://oda-architecture.com/html/pro...000/3-txt.html


    1107 BROADWAY (The Toy Building) -- 2007
    NEW YORK, NEW YORK

    The International Toy Center North Building is located in the historic area surrounding Madison Square Park at the corner of Broadway and 24th Street in New York City. The 16 story, 300,000 sf North Toy Building, designed by H. Craige Servance & W. Van Alen, sits on the site of the old Albemarle Hotel and was constructed in 1915 when the neighborhood’s focus was changing from a place of grand hotels to a place of central commerce in New York. In the 1950’s the area became known as the International Toy Center.
    In recent time, the neighborhood has been shifting from a place of commerce to a place of living. Tessler Development has approached ODA in converting the North Toy Building into 175 luxury residences with retail on the first floor. Approximately 29,000 sf will be removed from the rear of the building and relocated to the roof of the building. The building will be a total of 23 stories and approximately 370’ in height. The design approach for the 7 story addition is generated from the playfulness of a child’s toy block construction. This approach allows each penthouse villa to have its own character that captures the views of the park with terraces and corner windows with privacy. The playfulness also draws back to the days of when the building was at the heart the International Toy Center. The design of the base of the building will visually connect with the top of the building. The amenities for the building will include a swimming pool, valet parking, gym, lounge, and two rooftop bar areas for the residence.


    .© 2007 Office for Design & Architecture
    Last edited by Derek2k3; August 16th, 2008 at 10:27 PM.

  14. #14

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    What the hell is that?!

  15. #15
    Forum Veteran Tectonic's Avatar
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    Whhhhyyy?? :-(
    Last edited by Tectonic; August 17th, 2008 at 09:58 AM.

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