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Thread: Travel In China

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    Default Travel In China


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    What's the story on all those fancy sports cars?

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    They drive too fast at the speed of about 180 km/h ,that crazy me when I sit in the hot car.

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    just take a pic out of my window.

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    a big bridge in a small picture

  9. #9
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jim150011911
    They drive too fast at the speed of about 180 km/h ....
    Do you have one of those fast cars?

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by lofter1
    Do you have one of those fast cars?
    ...and why are they almost all yellow?

  11. #11
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    Chinese Color Theory

    The Symbolism of Color in Traditional Chinese Culture

    Yellow, the royal color used by the emperors, represents power and authority (2). It is associated with the Earth Element, which symbolizes growth (2). The Chinese word for yellow, huang, sounds like the word for "royal," and thus was chosen thousands of years ago as the exclusive color for the imperial household (1). Under the penalty of death, no Chinese person other than the emperor was permitted to be clothed in any shade of yellow or gold (1).

    Traditional Chinese buildings were not designed with the exclusive consideration of form but also with respect to the symbolism of colors (2). The application of paint served the dual purpose of protection and providing symbolic significance to the building elements (2).

    Color schemes for buildings were developed from the Chunqiu era to the Ming dynasty (2). Bright colors were very popular during these early periods (2). The importance of a building was insinuated by the color scheme of the walls and roofs in the following sequence: yellow, red, green, blue, black, and gray (2). The roofs of the imperial palaces were yellow, while those of the less distinguished buildings were green (2).

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    ^ Interesting. The license plates are also yellow. Is that for the same reason? Every man a king...?

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    jim must have go to NanJing the bridge above called NANJING CHANGJIANG BRIDGE china's first self-built bridge across the changjiang river which is the longest river in china. and about the yellow story it's true though anyway really nothing to do with the cars, just a incident.

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    China sure is developing fast.

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    Thanks for replying. It seems that lofter1 are very interesting at chinese traditional culture.
    That isn`t NANJING Bridge,it`s wuhan Bridge wich is the firrst bridge acrossing the CHANGJIANG RIVER.
    That`s the NANJING Bridge.
    Last edited by jim150011911; April 17th, 2006 at 12:53 AM.

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